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FROM THE 

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FROM THB 

BRICiJ^HT LEGACY. 

One half the income from this Legacy, which was 
received in 1880 under the will of 

JONATHAN BROWN BRIGHT 

of Waltham, Massachusetts, is to be expended for 
books for the College Library. The other half of the 
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A History 

OF 

Tennessee and Tennesseans 

The Leaders and Representative Men in Commerce, 
Industry and Modern Activities 

BY 

WILL T. HALE 

Author of "The Backward Trail : Stories of the Indians and Tennessee 
Pioneers," "Great Southerners," "Marriage and Divorce, and 
Land Laws of Tennessee," "True Stories of James- 
town, Va.", "An Autumn Lane and Other 
Poems" and "Folk-Tales of the 
Southern Hill People," 

AND 

DIXON L. MERRITT 



VOLUME V 



ILLUSTRATED 



THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

(Not Inc.) 

Chicago and New York 
1913 



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Tennessee and Tennesseans 



Samuel Bennett Wilson. In the financial system which so facili- 
tates the operations even of local trade, Cross Plains included among its 
capable bank officials, the genial young cashier, Samuel B. Wilson. His 
is a Tennessee family, identified with the interests of this state for sev- 
eral generations. Through his mother, Mr. Wilson is a descendant of 
the Bennett line, of early Tennessee settlement, his grandfather, Bur- 
rell Bennett, having been a prosperous farmer and slave-owner. His 
daughter, Elizabeth (1849-1899), bom in Sequatchie, Tennessee, was 
united in marriage with William H. Wilson (1847-1897) and shared his 
fortunes during their half-century of life together. William Wilson was 
a school teacher and farmer. At one time he was was possessed of 
abundant property and money, but his was the fate of the too kindly 
man who signs security papers for the unreliable, for in that way he 
sacrificed his means, very shortly before his death. He is remembered 
as a man of particular intelligence and generous character. A Democrat 
in politics, he took a lively interest in local affairs of a public nature. 
He was active and honored in the organizations of the Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, and was an esteemed member of the Cumberland Pres- 
byterian church, as his wife was of the Baptist. William and Elizabeth 
Wilson were the parents of five children, all of whom are yet living. Of 
these the youngest was named Samuel B., and he it is whose life forms 
the special subject of this sketch. 

Born in Sequatchie county, Tennessee, on the important date of July 
4, in 1880, Samuel B. Wilson followed the usual experiences of a well- 
to-do farmer's son in the rural schools, with additional advantages from 
the school systems of Knoxville and Chattanooga. 

His education completed, as a young man Mr. Wilson first occupied 
himself with farming occupations. Subsequently he accepted employ- 
ment in a mercantile establishment. From that he passed to a position 
HS assistant cashier in the bank at Whitwell, Tennessee. There he re- 
mained for two and one-half years. In 1907 he came to Cross Plains, 
Tennessee, where he assisted other public-spirited and enterprising citi- 

1207 



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1208 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

zens in organizing a similar commercial institution. He was' made first 
cashier of this bank at Cross Plains, which has a capital of $20,000^ a 
surplus of $2,000 and an average deposit of $55,000. Mr. Wilson is a 
director and stockholder of the bank. 

Other financial interests of Samuel B. Wilson include his farm of 
300 acres, a part of the original homestead of his grandfather, Bennett, 
Besides a share with his brother-in-law, in a mercantile business near 
Chattanooga. Mr. Wilson is a wide-awake man about town and is hon- 
ored in the fraternal circles of the Free and Accepted Masons, the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modem Woodmen of America. 
He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, South. 

Lawrence A. Ward. A well-to-do and leading business man of 
Obion, as a man who has in more than one line given worthy public 
service, and as a member of organizatious that tend toward the better- 
ment of humanity, L. A. Ward is one whose life is of interest to his- 
torian and reader. Of his forty odd years in the lumber industry 
more than a score have been spent in the city of Obion. 

Greenwood, Indiana, was the place of L. A. Ward's birth and Jan- 
uary 21, 1853, was his natal day. His parents were James and Martha 
Ward, the father a native of Xenia, Ohio, and the mother one of Indi- 
ana's daughters. They removed from the Hoosier state to Tennessee, 
where the boyhood of L. A. Ward was spent and where he has lived 
his subsequent life of usefulness. He early became interested in saw- 
mills and lumber, entering this line of business when only sixteen years 
of age— in 1869. 

The year 1887 was a doubly important one in the life of Mr. Ward, 
for it was marked both by his marriage and by his initial residence in 
Obion. On March 24, of the year mentioned, Miss Joe Thornton, of 
Weakley county, Tennessee, joined her life's fortunes with 'his. In the 
years that have followed, their home has been gladdened by the coming 
of three children. Cosier, the first bom, and Miles Thornton the 
youngest, have passed from this life. Owen Stanley, the second son, 
was bom February 21, 1893. 

Mr. Ward and his family are connected with the Church of the 
Disciples, or Christian church, of which they are substantially helpful 
members. The fraternal society of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 
is honored by his aflBliation with the local lodge. His politics is that 
of almost every other son of '*the solid south'' and he has cheerfully 
and ably performed such public duties as have devolved upon him. 
For the past fifteen years he has served as an alderman of Obion and 
has also been an eflBcient member of the Obion school board. 

The property of Mr. Ward includes about seven hundred acres of 
land, of which a tract of one hundred acres is devoted to the produc- 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1209 

tion of rice. His lumber business is of course the most significant 
feature of his property. His mill and yard cover a space of three 
acres in Obion. He employs ten men throughout the entire year and 
at busy times often has as large a force as thirty. In his plant the 
lumber manufactures include everything required for the building of 
a house, with the single exception of blinds. His business is of prime 
importance to Obion and the adjacent vicinity and he is personally a 
gentleman whose worth and influence are held in high esteem by his 
fellow-citizens of the community. 

James Q. Shires. One of the most attractive establishments in 
Obion is the jewelry establishment of J. Q. Shires. One of the finest 
stores in the city, it occupies three hundred and seventy-five feet of 
floor space and is filled with heavy and expansive glass cases contain- 
ing every variety of jewelry. This stock is of the best and most modern 
workmanship and draws many customers. This business has been lo- 
cated fn Obion since 1905. 

Its proprietor, J. Q. Shires, is a native of Obion county, where his 
parents, Thomas and Lissie Shires, resided for many years. Thomas 
Shires was a mechanic, whose ability has been inherited by his son in 
a more highly developed form. The two children of the family were 
J. Q. Shires, the special subject of this review, and W. T. Shires, his 
younger brother. The date of birth of the former was the year 1885. 

J. Q. Shires grew to manhood in his parental home and in its vicin- 
ity received his opportunities for mental development. His mechanical 
genius was early evident and all his life's experiences have been turned 
to practical account. He had scarcely attained the years of his 
majority when he established his present business, which has been suc- 
cessful from the beginning. 

After several years of prosperous business life Mr. Shires was 
united to his life's companion, who was well known in her girlhood 
days as Miss Maple Grissom. The Shires-Grissom nuptials were cele- 
brated in 1912 and the young pair occupy an enviable place in their 
wide circle of friends. They are faithful and valued members of the 
Church of the Disciples of this place. 

Mr. Shires is a man of intelligent interests in all lines. He is not, 
however, one who seeks conspicuous places in the limelight of life, pre- 
ferring to devote his time and attention to his home, his church and his 
business. His large experience in his line, his natural gifts for grasp 
ing and executing the most intricate and complex pieces of workman 
ship — ^these are elements of his vocational life which guarantee his suc- 
cess in the work he has chosen. 

Virgil J. Jernigan, M. D. The need of high regard is not the least 
of the world's tribute to that most helpful of all professions — that of 



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1210 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

the conscientious physician. And wheii, to his qualities as physician 
are added those of the practical Christian, such a man's usefulness is 
infinitely multiplied. One member of this profession, who has won 
both sincere appreciation and pecuniary success and who still con- 
tinues to rise in the ranks of his fellows, is V. J. Jernigan, the well- 
known physician of Obion. 

For five generations his family have resided in Tennessee. The 
doctor's paternal grandfather was Elisha Jernigan, who married Miss 
Stone. Robertson county, Tennessee, was the home of E. T. Jernigan 
and L. M. Jernigan, his wife.They were both natives of the state, E. T. 
Jernigan being a planter of considerable property. He was largely 
engaged in the production of tobacco and handled it also in a com- 
mercial way. He and his wife were the parents of six children, of 
whom the eldest was V. J. Jernigan, the subject of this biographical 
account. He was born in Robertson county in 1868. 

V. J. Jernigan received his early training, both in books and in 
the practical things of life, in his native county. When he wds four- 
teen years of age. Union City, in Obion county, became his home. Here 
his education was continued in the public schools of the place. When 
that period of his intellectual development was concluded, he entered 
Webb Brothers' Academy, at Bellbuckle, and later passed to the McTyre 
Institute at McKenzie. 

Thus, well equipped with the general knowledge, which is ever 
valuable, the young man, V. J. Jernigan, entered temporarily the pro- 
fession of teaching. In this useful occupation he continued for three 
years and at the end of that time made arrangements for beginning 
his preparation for the medical profession. 

He matriculated at Vanderbilt University and entered upon the 
prescribed courses in the college of medicine in 1897, which is one 
of the strongest departments of that great institution. He was grad- 
uated in 1900, receiving his degree of doctor of medicine. 

Doctor Jernigan chose the city of Obion as the field for his practice. 
Here he has built up a most desirable practice and has endeared him- 
self in many ways to his numerous patrons. He is thoroughly inter- 
ested in every branch of his science and is constantly increasing his 
breadth of knowledge. In 1906 he went to New York City, where he 
took a post-graduate course in the Polyclinic College of Physicians. 
In 1908 he returned to his alma mater, Vanderbilt University, for 
further post-graduate research. In the year 1912 he took yet more 
advanced and specialized work in the University of Chicago. The 
doctor fully realizes the almost infinite possibilities of present day 
medicine and it is not too much to say that truly great ones will be 
reached by him. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1211 

Doctor Jernigan is an important member of the county, state and 
tri-state medical associations. He is one of Obion's officers on the 
board of health and is medical examiner for several insurance com- 
panies. He finds time for fraternal and church associations. Of the 
former, he is a member of the orders of Knights of Pythias and Wood- 
men of the World. His religious affiliation is with the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

The doctor's attractive home is presided over by Mrs. Anna White 
Jernigan, his wife, to whom he was united in 1895, in Union City. 
Doctor and Mrs. Jernigan are the parents of two sons and one daughter. 
The family is one that ranks high in the social life of Obion and one 
whose friends are legion. Doctor Jernigan is, notwithstanding his busy 
life and his many interests, a very close student of both books and 
men and is intellectually broad as well as professionally conscientious 
and scientifically purposive. 

John W. Bennett. Among the merchants of Obion county prob- 
ably none is more widely or more favorably known than the subject of 
this review, who has been engaged in business in the city of Troy for 
a period of forty years. His parents, Wm. H. and Temperance (Jack- 
son) Bennett, were both natives of North Carolina and were married 
after coming to Tennessee. In 1840 he came to Tennessee and settled 
in Decatur county, but after a residence of about twelve or thirteen 
years there they removed to Obion county in 1853, and here W. H. 
Bennett purchased a farm and was engaged in agricultural pursuits 
until his death, which occurred on May 22, 1896. He owned about 
five hundred acres at the time of his death. He and his wife were the 
parents of twelve children, ten sons and two daughters, ten of whom 
are now living, the sons being either farmers or merchants. The 
family is therefore well known throughout the county, where its mem- 
bers have wielded considerable infiuence upon the industries and political 
destinies of the county and state. 

John W. Bennett was bom April 1, 1851, in Decatur county, Ten- 
nessee, and came to Obion with parents when about three years old, 
where his entire life has been passed. He was educated in the local 
schools, and while still in his boyhood became interested in mercantile 
pursuits, with which he has ever since been associated. Beginning 
business for himself with a small stock of goods, he has gradually added 
to it until at the present time he has one of the best assortments and 
one of the best equipped mercantile establishments in the city of Troy. 
His store building is thirty by one hundred feet and two stories in 
height. It is considered one of the best brick buildings in Troy. Pass- 
ing from the outside to the interior of the building the visitor is at 
once impressed with the well selected and carefully arranged stock of 



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1212 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

general merchandise, including a fidl line of general hardware and 
groceries. Here Mr. Bennett is ** monarch of all he surveys." He has 
been in the business for so long a time that he knows just where every- 
thing is, so that his customers are sure of prompt attention and cour- 
teous treatment at all times. By assiduous attention to the needs of 
his trade and care in the selection of goods to meet the demand, he has 
built up a lucrative and permanent business. It is intended as no 
disparagement to the other retail dealers of Troy to say that he stands 
at the head, and it might be said that he is the Nestor of the mercan- 
tile business of the city. 

Mr. Bennett, notwithstanding the demands of his personal affairs 
and his constantly growing trade, has found time to devote to the 
public welfare in an official capacity. He has served as a member of 
the town board, and is always a willing and intelligent helper of any 
and every movement for the improvement of Troy and the welfare of 
her people. His long residence there has rendered him familiar with 
conditions, and he is usually one of the first men to be consulted when 
any proposition for the advancement of Troy's material interests comes 
up for consideration, thus marking him as a man of public spirit and 
progressive ideas. 

In 1874 Mr. Bennett married Miss Amanda Oliver, daughter of 
WiUiam Oliver, and to this union have been born two children — John 
0. and Clara. The son is now the manager of the Troy Flour Mills 
and is one of the promising young business men of the city. The 
daughter married Q. R. McDade, of Troy. 

Calvin E. Upchurch, D. D. S. While medicine — and especially 
surgery — has made rapid strides in the ranks of science and has marked 
the successful physician as a most significant figure iu modern civiliza- 
tion, no less remarkable achievements have been made in dental surgery. 
The restoration of health and the prolonging of life are often made 
possible through the preservation of teeth or the substitution of arti- 
ficial ones. 

The only dental surgeon of Obion is Dr. C. E. Upchurch, who has 
practiced here since 1904 and who enjoys a very wide patronage. Its 
extent and its constant growth are among the numerous evidences of 
the doctor's superior skill and wide knowledge of all phases of his 
science. By education and training he is well fitted to stand at the 
head of his profession. 

Doctor Upchurch is of Alabama birth, that state being also the 
place of nativity of both his parents, Calvin and Sarah (Childers) 
Upchurch. Of the four children bom in this home the fourth in order 
of birth was he whose name forms the caption of this sketch. He was 
bom in 1877. In his native home he was reared and educated liberally. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1213 

After the preliminary years of general education he entered Vander- 
bilt University in Nashville, where in the college of dental surgery he 
pursued thorough courses and was graduated in 1904 with the degree 
of doctor of dental surgery. He then located in his present home and 
field of professional practice — the town of Obion.* 

In 1907 Doctor Upchurch was united in marriage to Miss Sadie 
Howell, of Obion, Tennessee. Mrs. Upchurch is a daughter of John 
W. Howell, who is a well-known citizen of this place. Doctor and 
Mrs. Upchurch are the parents of one child, a little daughter named 
Lulu Janette. 

The church affiliation of Doctor Upchurch and his family is with 
the Baptist congregation of this place. For some years the doctor has 
served this church in the capacity of clerk, the duties of which office 
he ably performs. He is a man who has established wide friendly 
relations and is popular in various organizations, including the fra- 
ternal societies of Knights of Pythias and Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons. The former body honors him with the status of past chan- 
cellor. 

The business office and operating rooms of Doctor Upchurch are 
located at the corner of Broadway and Main street. They are finely 
finished rooms, elaborately furnished and thoroughly equipped with the 
best and most up-to-date apparatus for his work. 

Gordon B. Bahid. In the rapidly developing history of the modern 
era there is perhaps no one influence comparable to that of the press. 
Through this ubiquitous medium fleets each day's momentous news and 
the psychology of nations is carried round the world. The great 
metropolitan press, with its complex network of intellectual machinery, 
connecting myriad points on the globe, does its great work of dissemi- 
nating universal information of importance to the world. No less 
valuable, in its less pretentious way, is the local press of county or 
town, which keeps in mental touch the citizens of county seat and 
remotest farm. A worthy exponent of our newspaper systems is Editor 
Gordon B. Baird, who conducts the Ohion County Enterprise. 

Mr. Baird is an energetic representative of the younger generation 
of the men who are doing things. He is a son of James M. and Rebecca 
(Smith) Baird, a former native of middle Tennessee and later of west 
Tennessee. They lived in Carroll county during their earlier married 
years and it was during their residence there that their third child, a 
son, whom they named Gordon, was bom, on January 12, 1888. 

Gordon Baird had excellent advantages from the first. His father 
was an attorney, who had acquired an enviable prestige for l^al 
acumen in his native county. While Gordon Baird was yet a child the 
father died and his mother removed to Fulton, Kentucky, where the 



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1214 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

son's education was completed. In 1909 he returned to his native 
state, which has been the scene of Gordon Baird's vocational success. 
In 1909 he established himself in Obion, where he entered upon his 
present work as editor and publisher of the Enterprise. In 1910 he 
won as his life's closest companion Miss Anna Lee Pascall, well known 
in Fulton, Kentucky, as the daughter of T. T. Pascall. Mr. and Mrs. 
Baird have a small daughter, named Mary Gordon Baird. 

Mr. Baird 's most enthusiastic attention, as well as his choicest gifts, 
are devoted to his editorial work. The Obion County Enterprise is a 
six-column sheet, well constructed and finished, with editing of a par- 
ticularly breezy and eflfective quality. Its circulation is one that will 
average well with that of any paper in the county. Mr. Baird also 
does the job printing for Obion and its vicinity, being in every way 
thoroughly well equipped for such responsible work. He is a Demo- 
crat in his political affiliation. 

George A. Davidson. Notwithstanding the fact that great fortunes 
are sometimes made in speculation and by manipulation of the piarkets, 
it is undeniable that there is no line of honest effort which offers greater 
or more certain returns than intelligent and, painstaking cultivation of 
the soil. In recent years, by scientific methods and careful manage- 
ment introduced among the best agriculturists of the country, it has 
been demonstrated that the fertility of the soil can be preserved and 
even increased, and that agriculture as an occupation can be made more 
profitable by what is known as intensive farming. By this method, 
the number of acres is not so much a factor as the amount produced 
upon a single acre. The man who cultivates eighty acres of wheat and 
harvests fifteen bushels to the acre does much more work and receives 
far less for his labor than the man who cultivates forty acres and 
harvests thirty bushels to the acre. 

George A. Davidson is one of those progressive individuals who, 
profiting by experience, and past mistakes, are constantly endeavoring to 
increase the yield from their farms. He owns nine hundred and fifty 
acres in Obion county, Tennessee, and another farm of two hundred 
and twenty acres, on which he raises cotton, corn and wheat. Of his 
Obion county farm two hundred and fifty acres are under cultivation. 
Here he has been experimenting with rice culture, and on twenty-five 
acres he has raised one thousand bushels. This has convinced him that 
rice can be grown with profit in Tennessee, and he is preparing to 
increase the acreage devoted to rice culture to at least one hundred and 
twenty-five acres, the remainder of the land under cultivation to be 
devoted to the customary crops of this section of the state. He does 
not believe in **luck'' as a factor in making farming a profitable occu- 
pation, but relies upon his industry and its thoughtful application. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1215 

Every plan on his farm is thoroughly worked out, and then, when it is 
matured, it is carefully executed. If it fails to accomplish what is 
expected of it, another plan is tried. He never makes the same mis- 
take twice. By this course he has come to be known as one of the 
most progressive and successful farmers of west Tennessee. 

Mr. Davidson was born in Obion county, January 7, 1861, and 
has lived there all his life so far. He was educated in the common 
schools and grew to manhood on his father's farm. He is the fourth 
of six children born to Josephus C. and Arabelle (Inman) Davidson, 
the former a native of Tennessee and the latter of Mississippi. His 
grandparents, George and Mary Davidson, were natives of North Caro- 
lina, but joined the tide of emigration from that state in early days 
and settled in Davidson county, Tennessee, not far from the city of 
Nashville. 

On December 9, 1896, Mr. Davidson married Miss Anna E. 
Richardson, daughter of Dr. Elbridge G. and Josephine (Terrell) Rich- 
ardson, and to this union have been born four children — Earl, Lena and 
Lara (twins), and Robert J. Mrs. Davidson's father was a native of 
Brewersville, Tennessee, and during the Civil war he served with dis- 
tinction {^s captain in a Missouri artillery regiment. After the war he 
became a prominent physician of Obion, where he enjoyed a lucrative 
practice and had many friends. He married Josephine Terrell in 
1860, and of the six children bom to them Mrs. Davidson is the only 
one now living. Mr. Davidson is a Democrat, but never aspired to office. 
He is a member of the A. F. & A. M. of Glass, Obion county (Palestine 
Lodge, No. 296). He and his family are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, South. 

Brice p. Moppatt. It seems to be a well-established fact, and one 
which has frequently been commented upon in the columns of the 
popular press, that during the last few years the young men of the 
country are annually coming to occupy positions of greater prominence 
and responsibility in the business world. As a rule these young men 
are both progressive and aggl-essive. Many of them have fitted them- 
selves for their work by taking special courses in the leading educa- 
tional institutions of the country, where they have become well grounded 
in the fundamental knowledge of the profession or occupation they have 
selected for their life's work. When they leave school and begin to 
apply the theories they have learned they are not slow to discard the 
obsolete methods of the past and conduct their business according: to 
those of more modem times. 

A fine example of this truth may be seen in Brice P. Moffatt, one 
of the best known druggists and rising young business men of Troy, 
Obion county, Tennessee, where he was bom on April 23, 1891, and 



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1216 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

is a descendant of one of the oldest families of that section of the 
state. The first of the name to locate in Tennessee was John Moflfatt^ 
the great-grandfather of Brice. He was a native of South Carolina, 
where he married a Miss Strong, and in 1840 left Chester district and 
settled in Obion county, where he purchased four hundred acres of 
fertile land and became one of the leading agriculturists. His son 
James S., one of a family of twelve children, married Miss Martha 
Moffatt and engaged in farming, owning three hundred acres of land 
and a number of negro slaves. He was also one of the pioneer 
merchants of Troy, having established himself in business there as 
early as 1841. He was bom in South Carolina in 1818, was a public- 
spirited man, a member of the Presbyterian church, and a liberal 
contributor to every worthy cause for the advancement of the com- 
munity. The business he established passed to his sons, and from 
them to his grandsons, so that three generations of the family have 
been engaged in merchandising *'at the old stand." James S. Moffatt 
died in 1890 and his wife died in 1859. Of their six children only 
one is now living. J. P, Moffatt, the grandfather of the subject of 
this sketch, was also born in South Carolina and succeeded to the busi- 
ness of his father upon the latter 's retirement from active affairs. He 
served for more than three years in the Confederate army during the 
Civil war, was wounded at Rome, Gfeorgia, in 1863, and rose to the 
rank of second lieutenant. His death occurred in 1873. He married 
Miss Mary Brice, a native of South Carolina, and to them were born 
six children, only two of whom are now living, James R. and Pressley 
W., who are now proprietors of the mercantile establishment founded 
by their grandfather in 1841. This business includes a complete line 
of dry goods, clothing, farming implements, etc., and is one of the 
leading mercantile houses of Troy, with a trade that extends over a 
large section of the adjacent territory. 

James R. Moffatt was bom in Troy, Tennessee, May 29, 1861. He 
was educated in the local schools and in 1878 succeeded to the business 
of his father. In 1889 he married Miss Lulu Marshall, daughter of 
R. H. Marshall, and of their five children two are now living, Brice P. 
and Maud. His brother and partner, Pressley W., was bom in Troy 
on January 15, 1869. He married Miss Mary Maxey, and their four 
children are Maxey, Jennie, Pressley W., Jr., and Sarah. 

Brice P. Moffatt, whose name introduces this review, acquired his 
elementary education in the public schools of his native city of Troy. 
He then entered the department of pharmacy in the Northwestern 
University, at Chicago, and there graduated as a member of the class 
of 1911. The same year he became a registered pharmacist and opened 
his drug store in Troy. His store, which is twenty-four by sixty feet 
in dimensions, is equipped with everything to be found in a model drug 
store of the present day. Besides the customary stock of drugs and 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1217 

medicines, he carries a complete line of paints, oils, perfumery, toilet 
articles, etc., and his close attention to business and the wants of his 
customers is bearing fruit in the way of a constantly increasing patron- 
age. Mr. Moffatt is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Lodge No. 
679, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of Union City, Ten- 
nessee, and also of the Phi Delta Chi college fraternity. About the 
time he started in business for himself he was united in marriage with 
Miss Mary Whittaker, of Hopkinsville, Kentucky, and he and his wife 
are prominent in the social circles of Troy. 

Benjamin H. SErriiE. Among the well-known and substantial busi- 
ness men of Troy, Obion county, Benjamin H. Settle occupies a promi- 
nent position as a dealer in dressed lumber and building materials 
of all kinds. He was bom in North Carolina, August 11, 1849, and 
is a son of Benjamin and Sarah (Campbell) Settle, both natives of 
that state. The mother was of Scotch extraction and was a great- 
granddaughter of one of the dukes of Ar^le. In 1855 Benjamin 
Settle removed with his family to Tennessee and settled in Fayette 
county, where he purchased eight hundred acres of land and engaged 
in agricultural pursuits upon a large scale for that period. He was 
also interested in real estate operations and in the slave trade, becoming 
in time one of the wealthiest men in the county. When the Civil 
war began he remained loyal to the government of the north, though 
be was opposed to the war. His attitude incurred the enmity of some of 
the southern sympathizers, and on January 20, 1864, he was killed by a 
party of Confederate guerrillas. He and his wife were the parents of 
seven children, five of whom are now living, Benjamin H. being the second 
child in the order of birth and the only son. Although not yet fifteen 
years of age at the time of his father's untimely death, he bravely 
took up the work of assisting his widowed mother in the support of 
her family. Under her direction and guidance he practically assumed 
the management of the estate, making ample provision for the family 
needs and selling considerable produce to the neighbors and in the 
adjacent towns. Thus his boyhood and youth were passed in Fayette 
county, where he managed to secure in the common schools a good 
practical education. In 1890 he became interested in the Ekdahl Fur- 
niture Company, for which he traveled over a broad territory. When 
the company failed, some time afterward, he took charge of the settle- 
ment of its affairs. "While thus engaged he acquired a knowledge of 
the lumber business that led to his engaging in that line of activity 
in 1893. For several years he was both dealer in and inspector of 
lumber, and during this time he learned all the details pertaining to 
the manufacture and sale of building materials. In 1902 he located 
in Troy, where he opened his lumber yard two years later. His yards, 
including the space occupied by his dwelling, covers four acres of 



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1218 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

ground, upon which there are two small cottages thai he rents. His 
past experience gave him an advantage in opening his new business 
in Troy, and his success was assured from the start. During the eight 
years that he has been thus engaged he has made money and gained 
a reputation as a square dealer in the materials he handles. He is 
public-spirited and takes a keen interest in everything that has a ten- 
dency to benefit the town. 

Mr. Settle has been twice married. In 1873 he married Miss 
Mattie Pickens, and to this union were born five children, three of 
whom are still living. They are John C, a well-to-do business man 
of San Francisco, California; Thomas B. is traffic manager of E. Clem- 
mons Horst Company of San Francisco, California; and Hugh L. of 
Memphis, Tennessee. All three of these sons are above the average 
type of business men in executive ability and resourcefulness. Mrs. 
Mattie Settle died in 1892, and subsequently Mr. Settle married Mrs. 
Sallie Weddington. No children have been born to this second 
marriage. 

The Settle family is well connected and has furnished at least one 
man who has been recognized in political and legal circles. Thomas 
Settle, a second cousin of the subject of this review, was chairman of 
the Republican national convention that nominated General Ulysses S. 
Grant for the presidency. He was a prominent attorney of North 
Carolina and served for some time as United States minister to Peru. 
Upon his return to this country he was appointed federal judge for 
the district of Florida and took up his residence at Tallahassee, where 
he passed the closing years of his life. Benjamin H. Settle is a Dem- 
ocrat. Both his wives were Cumberland Presbyterians and he is a 
Methodist. 

Mrs. Bonnie S. Maxwell. Among the old and honored pioneers 
who paved the way for the development of Obion county and the posi- 
tion that it occupies socially and financially at the present time, the 
name of Alexander W. Smith stands preeminent. He was a native of 
the Emerald Isle, but when a young man left Ireland with a brother 
to seek his fortune in the United States. They landed at New York 
in 1818 and the brother located in that state. Alexander, after some 
time in New York, made his way to South Carolina, locating in Chester 
district. Here he married Esther Graham, who was a relative of the 
celebrated Scottish chief, William Wallace. In 1840 he removed with 
his family to Tennessee and located in Tipton county, where he pur- 
chased two hundred acres of land and engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits. He was a strict conformist and adhered to the dogma and teach- 
ings of that sect. He died in 1870, aged seventy-two years, after a 
long and useful life, during which he wielded great influence upon the 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1219 

destinies of his adopted county. Alexander and Esther (Graham) 
Smith were the parents of four children — ^three sons and one daughter. 

One of his sons, James O. Smith, was the father of Mrs. Bonnie S. 
Maxwell. He was bom in So\ith Carolina, September 18, 1828, and 
became a resident of Obion county, Tennessee, in 1850. He was a well- 
educated gentleman and was a remarkable man in various respects. 
As a young man he taught school for several years, employing his 
spare hours in the study of Jaw. Into this subject he went deeply, 
and soon after his admission to the bar he became recognized as one 
of the leading attorneys of west Tennessee. For fifty years he prac- 
ticed his profession in Obion county, and at the time of his death on 
August 5, 1905, he was the oldest lawyer in the county. His funeral 
was a notable one in one particular. While many of his friends and 
acquaintances were in attendance, it was remarked that klLthe lawyers 
in the county had closed their oflSces on that occasion, in order to give 
them an opportunity to pay their respects to one whom they univer- 
sally loved as a man and admired as an attorney. James Q. Smith 
was everybody's friend. If he found a young man who desired to 
become a lawyer he was always ready to extend his aid, and a number 
of young attorneys owe him a debt of gratitude for his kindly words 
and advice, as well as more substantial assistance. Even the children 
on the street received his attention and he was universally popular. 
When the trouble between the north and south culminated in Civil 
war he espoused the cause of the Confederacy. On one occasion he 
was ordered to take the oath of allegiance to the federal government, 
but refused to do so. For his refusal he was treated as a prisoner of 
war and confined for some time in a military prison at St. Louis, 
Missouri. 

On January 3, 1854, James S. Smith and Sarah E. Allen were 
united in marriage, and to this union were born six children. Wallace 
S., born October 3, 1854, became the wife of H. H. Crockett on March 
16, 1871 ; Bonnie S., born June 2, 1856, was married to John B. Max- 
well on March 24, 1875; Wm. A., born September 26, 1858, married 
Miss Sunie Pressley on April 17, 1889 ; Dora S. married Rev. Thos. P. 
Pressley and is now deceased; Lutheran A., bom January 8, 1863, 
married Miss Annie Faulk on February 19, 1896; and Fitz James, 
bom October 16, 1864, attorney in Union City, Tennessee. 

John B. Maxwell was for many years a conspicuous figure in the 
affairs of Obion county. He was a native son of Tennessee, having 
been bora on April 21, 1855, in Henry county, where his father was 
a well-known and influential citizen. After securing a good educa- 
tion he decided to enter the field of journalism, and for some time he 
was editor of the Troy Times. He was also deputy clerk of the county 
court and was a factor in politics. As an editor he always advocated 
measures for the advancement of the moral, material and social inter- 
ests of Troy, and as a citizen he commanded the esteem and confidence 



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1220 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

of his fellow-townsmen in a marked degree. His death occurred on 
September 5, 1901, and was a distinct loss to the town where he had so 
long lived and labored. As stated above, he was married on March 
24,^1875, to Miss Bonnie S. Smith, and to this union were born nine 
children, two of whom passed away in childhood. Those living, with 
the dates of birth, are as follows : Basil B., February 4, 1878 ; Luther 
M., July 17, 1882; Martha M., September 24, 1887; Fitz L., March 10, 
1890; Dora W., December 7, 1892; Stonewall H., June 16, 1895, and 
John B., October 16, 1897. 

In looking back over the lives of such men as Alexander W. Smith, 
James G. Smith and John B. Maxwell, the reader of the present genera- 
tion* may find a career worthy of emulation. They encountered many 
difficulties during the pioneer days, but with courage and fortitude 
overcame thenl and left to their posterity a better community and an 
untarnished name. A record of their deeds and achievement leads 
one to believe with Longfellow, that: 

** Lives of great men all remind us 
We can make our lives sublime; 
And, departing, leave behind us 
Footprints on the sands of Time.^' 

Matthew McClain, sheriff of Lewis county, Tennessee, and a resi- 
dent of Hohenwald, is a native of that county, has been one of its 
representative agriculturists for a number of years and always has 
been worthily identified with its best citizenship. He first took up the 
duties of sheriff on October 3, 1910, in consequence of his election to 
that office by the county court and his services were of that efficient 
order that in August, 1912, he was returned to that official station by 
the vote of the citizens of Lewis county. The McClains were originally 
of Kentucky stock, and the grandfather and father of Matthew McClain 
were, respectively, soldiers in the War of 1812 and in the Civil war, 
the latter as a supporter of the southern cause. The former, John 
McClain, was the first of the family to locate in Tennessee. He was 
bom in Kentucky April 4, 1777, and came to this state as a young 
man. He served throughout the second struggle for American inde- 
pendence and fought with Gten. Andrew Jackson at the battle of New 
Orleans in 1815. On coming to Tennessee he settled in Maury county, 
where he spent the remainder of his active years as a farmer. He 
lived to the remarkable age of one hundred and four years, passing 
away on April 4, 1881. In political adherency he was first a Whig 
and then later a Democrat. He wedded Elizabeth McMillian, also a 
Kentuckian by birth, who bore him seven sons and four daughters. 
Martin, the youngest of his sons and the father of Matthew, was bom 
in Maury county, this state, March 2, 1833, and grew to manhood 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1221 

there, receiving such educational discipline as the public schools of the 
place and period afforded. When the Civil war broke out he espoused 
the cause of the southland and entered the Confederate service as a 
member of Captain Biflfle's company, which was assigned to the Third 
Tennessee Regiment. At the battle of Fort Donelson he received a 
wound in his leg, from which he suffered severely and which caused 
him to return home. After the minnie ball causing the wound had 
been removed and he had recovered, which was some four months 
later, he returned to the service and remained with the army until its 
surrender. Returning to Maury county, he was married there in 1867 
and shortly afterward removed to Lewis county, ^here he purchased 
a small farm and was engaged in agricultural pursuits until his retire- 
ment in 1890. He is yet living and is quite active for one of his years, 
though suffering from failing sight. He has always been a stalwart 
supporter of the Democratic party in political affairs. His wife was 
Miss Nancy J. Beckum prior to her marriage, a daughter of Alexander 
Beckum and a native of Maury county, where she was born April 20, 
1848. She passed to rest on December 16, 1881, leaving a family of 
six children, all of whom are still living and are as follows: Felix, 
Matthew and Lavona, residents of Lewis county, Tennessee; Robert, 
whose home is in Maury county, this state; Knox, now located in New 
Mexico ; and Martin, also a resident of Lewis county. 

Matthew McClain, the second of this family, was born in the Fourth 
civil district of Lewis county, Tennessee, July 8, 1873. He received 
such educational advantages as the schools of Lewis county afforded at 
that time but which were very limited. He took up responsibilities 
at the early age of fourteen working a in a sawmill, first being employed 
in firing the engine and then later becoming a sawyer. At the age 
of twenty he bought a farm and took up agriculture, at the same time 
also running a sawmill. He carried on these industries jointly until 
October 3, 1910, when he became sheriff of Lewis county, which ofBce 
he continues to fill with satisfaction to all concerned. Prior to becom- 
ing sheriff, however, he had served ten years as a magistrate of the 
Fourth district of Lewis county. He still retains his farming inter- 
ests. Fraternally he is a member of Hohenwald Lodge, No. 293, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and in political views and allegiance 
he is a Democrat. 

On March 19, 1894, Mr. McClain was joined in marriage to Miss 
Betty Kilpatrick, daughter of William Kilpatrick, of Perry county. 
The union of Mr. and Mrs. McClain has been blessed with ten chil- 
dren, all living and all at home except the eldest daughter, Jennie, 
who is now the wife of Linton Maxwell and resides at Mount Pleasant, 
Maury county, Tennessee, and the youngest, who died March 8, 1913. 
In order of birth they are: William Thomas, Jennie, John Turley, 
Felix Martin, Capitola, Gladys, Alice, Medola. Lavona and Matthew. 



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1222 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

George J. Pierce. The honored subject of this review is numbered 
among the progressive and representative agriculturists of Obion county, 
where he is the owner of a finely improved landed estate of five hundred 
acres, situated near the boundary line between Tennessee and Kentucky, 
Pierce Station being his postoflSce address. He is a scion of one of the 
old and influential families of northwestern Tennessee and through his 
character and achievement he has well upheld the prestige of the hon- 
ored name which he bears and which has been closely identified with 
the civic and industrial activities of this section of the state for more 
than seventy years. 

Mr. Pierce was bom in Obion county, Tennessee, on the 8th of June, 
1850, and is a son of Thomas M. and Margaret (Blacknell) Pierce, the 
former of whom was bom in North Carolina, in 1810, and the latter of 
whom was several yeai-s his junior. Thomas M. Pierce received excellent 
educational advantages and was a man of fine intellectuality and marked 
business acumen. He was a successful teacher in the schools of Ten- 
nessee for a number of years and eventually became one of the prominent 
agriculturists and merchants of the northwestern part of the state, both 
he and his wife having passed the closing years of their lives in Obion 
county and both having held the unqualified esteem of all who knew 
them. Thomas M. Pierce came to Tennessee in the year 1842 and first 
located in Dresden, Weakley county, w^hence he later removed to Obion 
county. He became the owner of a fine landed estate of eight hundred 
acres, which he operated with slave labor prior to the Civil war, most 
•of this property having been confiscated at the close of the war, though 
he had been a stanch supporter of the cause of the Union and had ably 
opposed the secession of the Southern states. Notwithstanding his per- 
sonal atttitude at this climacteric period in the history of the nation, 
three of his sons — Thomas D., Henry H. land Eice A. — espoused the 
cause of the Confederate government and were valiant soldiers in the 
Southern service during the great fratracidal conflict. Mr. Pierce was 
a man of specially progressive ideas and policies, and he developed an 
extensive merchandise business, in connection with which he had well 
equipped general stores at Jacksonville, Union City, and Pierce, Ten- 
nessee, and at Fulton, Kentucky. 

Pierce Station was named for Thomas M. Pierce, who built the first 
station house himself, and was the first station master. He was also the 
first postmaster and held both oflBces until a short time before his death 
when he resigned. He was a Democrat but held the postoflfice through 
the Republican administration. 

Both Mr. Pierce and his wife held membership in the Methodist 
church, their lives having been ordered in harmony with the faith which 
they professed. Mrs. Pierce was graduated in one of the excellent edu- 
cational institutions of her native state, Virginia, and was a woman of 
exceptional culture and refinement. She was a successful and popular 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1223 

teacher in the schools of Tennessee prior to her marriage and she ever 
held the aflfectionate regard of all who came within the sphere of her 
gracious and gentle influence. The names of the children, with respective 
years of birth are here noted: Harriet, 1834; William B., 1836; T. 
Devereaux, 1838; Henry H., 1840; Rice A., 1842; Lawrence, 1844; and 
George J., 1850. The four. eldest were bom in North Carolina and the 
remainder in Weakley county, this state, except George J., who is the 
subject of this review and the youngest of the number, he having been 
bom in what is now Obion county, as previously noted. Of his brothers, 
Bice A., is now living. 

George J. Pierce was reared on the old homestead plantation and in 
connection therewith he gained practical discipline, the while he had the 
gracious environment and influences of a refined and hospitable home, — 
one representing the best of the fine old Southern regime. After avail- 
ing himself of the advantages of the common schools he identified him- 
self actively with agricultural pursuits, and during the long intervening 
years he has never severed his allegiance to this great basic industry, 
through the medium of which he has attained to substantial success 
and prosperity. His present beautiful and productive landed estate 
comprises five hundred acres and is one of the model farms of north- 
western Tennessee. It is principally devoted to the raising of tobacco, 
cotton, wheat and corn, and in carrying on the work ^Ir. Pierce employs 
many negroes, having about seven families on the estate and some of the 
number having been with the family since the days before the Civil 
war. 

Mr. Pierce is not only one of the progressive and enterprising agri- 
culturists of Obion county but is also a citizen of marke'd loyalty and 
public spirit. He gives his co-operation in support of measures pro- 
jected for the general good of the community and he holds secure vantage 
ground in the confidence and high regard of the people of his native 
county. He is a stanch supporter of the cause of the Democratic party 
and both he and his wife are zealous members of the Presbyterian church, 
in which he held the oflice of elder for fully a quarter of century. 

In the year 1882 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Pierce to Miss 
Mary L. Gibbs, who was 'born in Mississippi, and who is a daughter of 
the late Judge Q. D. Gibbs, a representative citizen of his county, in 
Mississippi. Mr. and Mrs. Pierce became the parents of nine children, 
namely : Annie, Louise and Joseph, who are deceased ; and William B., 
George J., Jr., Margaret Dorsey, ]Maraie, and Sherley. The attractive 
family home is known for its generous and gracious hospitality and Mr. 
Pierce and his family are popular facts in the social life of the com- 
munity. 

Joseph Goodwin Rice. In political and mercantile circles, prob- 
ably no man in Lewis county is more widely known than Joseph Good- 



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1224 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

win Rice, the present genial and efficient county clerk. His grand- 
father, Jerry Rice, was a pioneer farmer of southern Illinois, where 
his children were bom, but before they grew to maturity he removed 
to Dunklin county, Missouri. Here he passed the closing years of his 
life engaged in agricultural pursuits. James B. Rice, the father of 
the subject of this sketch, was born in Illinois in 1834, but went with 
his parents in childhood to Missouri, where he was educated in the 
common schools and became a minister in the Methodist Episcopal 
church. South. He was also engaged in farming and merchandising 
at Kennett, Dunklin county, Missouri. About the time he arrived at 
man's estate, Samuel and Leona Wilbum removed from Tennessee to 
Dunklin county and settled at Kennett. Their daughter, Sarah, who 
was born in Perry county, Tennessee, in 1834, became the wife of Rev. 
J. B. Rice, and of the seven children bom to them the subject of this 
review is the only one now living. J. B. Rice died in 1869 and his 
widow subsequently married R. R. Johnson. With him and her chil- 
dren she removed to Tennessee, settling in Perry county, whither her 
mother had gone some years before, after the death of Samuel Wilbum. 

Joseph Goodwin Rice was bom at Kennett, Dunklin county, Mis- 
souri, September 24, 1862. He attended the public schools of his 
native county until the family removed to Tennessee, after which he 
finished his education in the public schools of that county and at Beach 
Grove Academy. His mother died in 1881, and about that time he 
began his business career as a clerk in a store at Pleasantville. Later 
he was similarly employed at Etna. In 1889 he was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Laura McClearen, daughter of A. C. McClearen, a 
prominent fanner of Pleasantville, Tennessee. After his marriage Mr. 
Rice removed to Hickman county, where for the next six years he fol- 
lowed farming, after which he was engaged in the mercantile business 
at Kimmins, Lewis county, for about ten years. He still retains an 
interest in this business, of which his son, Carl Rice, is manager. The 
establishment has been organized as a stock company, known as the 
Kimmins Mercantile Company, and has a large patronage among the 
people of the town and the farmers of the surrounding country. 

Ever since he became a voter Mr. Rice has been a consistent sup- 
porter of the Democratic party and its principles. His activity in 
behalf of his party led to his nomination and election to the office of 
county clerk in 1908, and under his administration the affairs of the 
office were conducted with such skill and ability that he was honored 
with a reelection in 1910. This indorsement by his fellow-citizens 
speaks volumes for his efficiency and integrity, and is one of which 
any man might feel justly proud. 

Mr. Rice is a member and one of the board of stewards of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. South. His fraternal relations are ex- 
pressed by membership in George DeSmith Lodge, No. 182, Knights 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1225 

of Pythias, of Hohenwald, and in both church and lodge he is an active 
and useful worker. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rice are the parents of eight children — Carl, Her- 
man, Bernard, Irene, Aubrey, Fred, Edward and WiUadene. As pre- 
viously stated, Carl is manager of the Kimmins Mercantile Company. 
The other children are at home with the parents, with the exception 
of Edward, who died in 1905 at the age of fifteen months. 

As a matter of family history it is worthy of note that Mr. Rice's 
father was a lifelong Democrat and a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
and also that he served in the Confederate army under Gen. Sterling 
Price. He was captured and held a prisoner for some time, being 
finally exchanged at Vicksburg. 

Fred L. Schubert. It is noteworthy that many of the sturdy and 
useful citizens of the United States either came from Grermany or are of 
German extraction. Moritz Schubert, the father of Fred L., was born in 
Saxony, Germany, in 1824, and about 1845 left the Fatherland to seek 
his fortune in America. He located in Ohio, where he followed farm- 
ing until 1880, when he removed with his family to Tennessee. In 
1860 he married Miss Bertha Kiefer, a native of Baden-Baden, Ger- 
many, where she was born in 1833 and came with her parents to Ohio 
when she was eleven years of age. Moritz Schubert passed to the life 
beyond in 1892. His widow is still living. He was a stanch Demo- 
crat in his political belief and during President Cleveland's second 
administration served for four years as postmaster of Hohenwald, 
where he located upon coming to the state in 1880, and near which 
town he owned a fine farm. He also served as justice of the peace for 
six years and in the latter years of his life was interested in mercan- 
tile pursuits, as well as other business enterprises. His religious be- 
lief was expressed by membership in the German Lutheran church. 

Fred L. Schubert, the fifth in a family of seven children bom to 
Moritz and Bertha (Kiefer) Schubert, was bom at Cincinnati, Ohio, 
May 3, 1873. His early education was acquired in the public schools 
of his native state and Tennessee. After completing the course in the 
public schools he prepared himself for the vocation of teacher and 
in 1889 began following that profession. While teaching he devoted 
his spare time to the study of law and in 1894 was admitted to the bar, 
shortly after he had reached the age of twenty-one years. Upon being 
admitted to practice he located in Hohenwald, where he has built up 
a satisfactory clientage and has won recognition as one of the able 
and successful attorneys of the county. He also owns a large farm 
in Lewis county, which he manages in connection with— or rather in 
addition to — ^his legal business. His agricultural instinct was doubt- 
less inherited from his father, and in the management of his farm he 
has shown a skill that challenges the admiration of the community. 



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1226 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Mr. Schubert has also found time to devote to the public welfare 
as a member of the Tennessee legislature. In 1905 he was elected to 
represent the Twentieth senatorial district in the state senate, and after 
serving two years in that body was elected to the lower house from the 
Seventeenth district for a term of two years. He then declined further 
political honors to attend to his private affairs, though he still takes a 
keen interest in the fortunes of the Democratic party, with which he 
has been identified since he attained to his majority, and which so 
signally honored him by twice electing him to the general assembly. 

In fraternal circles Mr. Schubert is well known, being a member and 
past master of Hohenwald Lodge No. 607, Free and Accepted Masons, 
Waynesboro Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and Gteorge DeSmith Lodge 
No. 182, Knights of Pythias, of Hohenwald. 

On October 18, 1900, Mr. Schubert married Miss Pearl DeHart, 
daughter of I. N. and Julia DeHart, of Nashville, Tennessee, and to this 
union has been* born one daughter — Julia Bertha. 

Raymond Crawford Hooper. A well-known and popular citizen of 
Hohenwald, Tennessee, was Raymond Crawford Hooper, who was twenty 
years in the service of the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway 
Company and for the last twelve years had charge of that company's 
interests at Hohenwald as station agent, during which time he so ordered 
his course as to win the high esteem of his acquaintances and to be ac- 
counted one of the sterling men of his community. He came from one 
of Tennessee's pioneer families and was a son of one of this state's loyal 
defenders of the Southern cause during the Civil war. The originator 
of the family in Tennessee was John Hooper, the great-grandfather of 
Raymond C, who came from North Carolina and settled on Sam's 
creek in Cheatham county, where he continued his occupation as a 
farmer. He had married before leaving North Carolina. One of his 
sons was Jesse Hooper, the grandfather of our subject, who spent his 
entire life in Cheatham county, Tennessee, and was one of its most 
prominent men. The latter also was a farmer and was an extensive slave 
holder. His son, Jesse Owen Hooper, the father of Raymond C, was 
born in Cheatham county, August 10, 1834, and grew to manhood in 
that county, receiving there his schooling. As a youth imbued with the 
loyal ardor so marked iamong the sons of Tennessee he ran away from 
home to join the Confederate ranks for service in the Civil war and 
became a member of Capt. Charles May's company in the Fiftieth Ten- 
nessee regiment. He served until near the close of the war and most of 
the time was a fifer in the fife and drum corps. After the war he re- 
turned to Cheatham county, was married there and shortly afterward 
removed to Dickson county, where he took up a farm in district No. 6. 
near Charlotte. Later he was engaged in the mercantile business at 
Charlotte for a number of years and spent his closing years there re- 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1227 

tired. He was a staunch Democrat in political views, and fraternally 
was a Mason. He was a member of the Christian church, while his wife 
was affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal church, south. The latter, 
who was Miss Mary Catherine Cullem as a maiden, was born in Cheatham 
county in 1836 and departed life in 1882. To these parents were born 
eight children, of whom our subject was second in birth and is the 
only one now living. 

Raymond Crawford Hooper was born at Charlotte, Dickson county, 
Tennessee, August 20, 1869, and received his education in the public 
schools of that town and at the Dickson Normal school. He first took 
up responsible duties as a clerk at Dickson, Tennessee, but after two 
years of that employment he entered upon railroad work as a brakeman 
on the Centerville branch of the Nashville, Chattanoog:a & St. Louis 
Railroad. Some time later he took up telegraphy and after he had 
mastered it he was appointed agent at Kimmins, Tennessee. That was 
in 1899. After twenty-one months of service there he was transferred 
to Hohenwald, Tennessee, where he remained twelve years, the whole of 
his twenty years of railroad service having been for the same company. 
He was also interested in agriculture and owned a farm in Lewis county 
and also one in Wayne county, this state. 

On January 15, 1903, Mr. Hooper was united in marriage to Miss 
Annie Laura Downing, daughter of S. W. Downing, who is engaged 
in farming and in the saw-mill business in Wayne county : To Mr. and 
Mrs. Hooper were bom four children, Mary, Maggie, Jesse Owen and 
Raymond, the latter two of whom are deceased. Mr. Hooper was a 
loyal supporter of the Democratic party and an enthusiastic worker in 
its behalf. Fraternally he was a member of Dickson Lodge, No. 468, 
Free and Accepted Masons, and of Nashville Consistory No. 21 of Scot- 
tish Rite Masons, and was a charter member and past chancellor com- 
mander of Greorge D. Smith Lodge No. 182, Knights of Pythias, at 
Hohenwald. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
South, as is also his wife, and in its faith he passed away January 4, 
1913. 

John P. Dabbs, M. D. Among the immigrants to Tennessee from the 
state of North Carolina was Vincent S. Dabbs, who was born in the latter 
state in 1815, and who came with his brothers and sisters to Tennesssee 
at an early date. They settled in Perry, Wayne and Lewis counties. 
Vincent S. Dabbs was a successful farmer and stock dealer. He was 
twice married. His first wife was a Miss Grinder, by whom he had two 
sons and two daughters, and after her death he married Ellen Elizabeth 
Lancaster, who bore him eight children, four of whom are still living, 
Dr. John P. Dabbs being the fourth in order of birth. Vincent S. Dabbs 
died in 1880, and his second wife, who was born in Missouri in 1835, 
passed away in 1911. He was a Whig until after that party was dis- 



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1228 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

banded, and from that time until his death he affiliated with the Demo- 
cratic party. He was a member of the Presbyterian church and his 
wife was a Primitive Baptist. 

Dr. John P. Dabbs was born in Farmers' Valley, Perry county, 
Tennessee, April 21, 1856. He received his early educational training 
in the public schools of his native county, after which he took a course in 
the Bryant & Stratton Business College at Nashville. He then taught 
in the public schools of Perry county for two years, at the end of which 
time he began the study of medicine. After suitable preparation, he 
entered the medical department of the University of Nashville, where he 
received the degree of M. D. in 1878, and took another course of lectures 
in 1882. He began practice at Farmers' Valley, but in 1890 removed 
to Linden and was actively engaged in practice until he located at 
Hohenwald in 1909. He is a member of the Tennessee State Medical 
Society and the Perry County Medical Society, and although more than 
a third of a century has elapsed since he first received his degree, he 
has not permitted himself to fall behind in the march of medical prog- 
ress. In keeping up with the procession, however, he knows how to be 
conservative without being non-progressive, and is never in a hurry to 
abandon a remedy that has been tried for the realm of experiment or 
empiricism. In addition to his professional work, he has been also ex- 
tensively interested in farming in Perry county, and has dealt in real 
estate to some extent. 

For many years Dr. Dabbs has been recognized as one of the leaders 
of the Democratic party in his county and district. In 1896 he was 
elected to the state senate from the Twentieth senatorial district, com- 
posed of Maury, Perry and Lewis counties, and served for two years. 
He served as chairman of the Democratic executive committee of Perry 
county for some time, and is now the secretary of the executive com- 
mittee of Lewis county. In 1904 he was appointed by Judge Woods to 
fill out an unexpired term as clerk of the circuit court of Perry county, 
and in whatever official position he has been called to serve he has given 
a good account of his stewardship. 

Fraternally Dr. Dabbs is a member of the camp of Woodmen of the 
World at Linden, the Masonic Lodge, No. 256, at Linden, and the Royal 
Arch chapter at Jackson, Tennessee. He and his wife are members of 
the Christian church. 

On August 21, 1877, Dr. Dabbs was united in marriage with Miss 
Sarah L. Randel, daughter of Dr. A. P. Randel, of Oregon county, 
Missouri. To this union were born seven children, five of whom are 
still living, viz : Mollie May, Commodore Olna, Ethel, Cleveland R. and 
Sadie Matt. Mollie married Samuel Lomax of Linden, Tennessee; Ethel 
is the wife of Joseph Tucker, a well known resident of Perry county; 
Sadie married C. H. Cude and lives in Texas ; and the two sons are en- 
gaged in the conduct of a large mercantile concern at Hohenwald, under 
the firm name of J. P. Dabbs & Sons. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1229 

William Taylor Daniel. It is an interesting and gratifying fact, 
so much has the restless, nomadic spirit grown in America, that among 
the representative men of Tennessee there is a remarkable percentage of 
native sons, men who have found in the locality of their nativity ample 
opportunity for successful professional, industrial and business careers. 
One of these is William Taylor Daniel, of Hohenwald, who since 1904, 
has been a resident and business man of Lewis county and previous 
to that was a well known and prominent citizen of his native county 
of Perry. The Daniel family has been established on Tennessee soil for 
full a century and its members have ever held worthy and useful places 
in society. It originated here with John W. Daniel, the grandfather of 
William T., who came into Tennessee from North Carolina about the 
beginning of the last century and settled on Yellow Creek. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Taylor. William Taylor Daniel, Sr., one of their seven 
children, was born in Dickson county, Tennessee, June 24, 1822, but was 
yet a youth when the family removed to PeiTy county, where he grew 
up and concluded a common school education. Taking up farming, he 
followed that occupation the most of his life, but in his later years he 
engaged in the mercantile business at Tom's Creek, Perry county and 
was one of the best known and most highly respected citizens of that 
county. In political sentiment he was a Democrat and was a magistrate 
of the fourth district in Perry county for forty years. In a fraternal 
way he was identified with the Masonic order, and in religious faith and 
church membership he was affiliated with the Christian denomination. 
He passed away in Perry county on July 18, 1910. There he was 
wedded in 1852 to Margaret Anne O'Guin, who was bom in Perry 
county, August 23, 1833, and is let living. She is also a member of the 
Christian church. 

Eleven children were bom to this union and of this family William 
Taylor Daniel, Jr., our subject, was second in birth and is one of 
four children yet living. He was reared in Perry county, was edu- 
cated in its public schools, and when he came of responsible age he 
took up farming there, following it until 1904, though in the mean- 
time he was also engaged in the mercantile business at Tom's Creek 
fourteen years. He then removed to Lewis county and entered the 
lumber business at Hohenwald as a lumber buyer for the firm of Pair 
& Ketter at Pittsburg, Tennessee, continuing thus engaged four years. 
During the last four years he has been associated with Samuel H. 
Hinson in the lumber business at Hohenwald. While a resident of 
Perry county he served as county judge from 1894 to 1902 and previous 
to that he had served as county surveyor five years and had been a 
magistrate of the fourth district of that county six years. Politically 
he has always been aligned with the Democratic party. Fraternally he 
is affiliated as a member of Hohenwald Lodge No. 607, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, with George D. Smith Lodge No. 182, Knights of 
Pythias and with Camp No. 215 of the Woodmen of the World. 



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1230 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

On February 16, 1875, Mr. Daniel was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Elizabeth Dyer, a daughter of C. C. Dyer, a well known farmer 
citizen of Perry county. Eight children have blessed this union and all 
are living. In order of birth they are: Lillie May, now Mrs. J. E. 
Burns, of Perry county, Tennessee ; Nora L., now Mrs. R. T. Campbell, 
and Chester Arthur Daniel, both residents of Hohenwald; Ethel, who 
is the wife of J. R. Downey and resides at Etna, Tennessee; E. A. 
Daniel, Maude, now Mrs. W. J. Beasley, and Grcrtrude, the wife of T. 
C. Allison, all of whom reside in Hohenwald; and Samuel L. Daniel. 
Mr. Daniel and his family are all members of the Christian church. 

WoiLiAM Barnabas Tucker, M. D. Well established in the success- 
ful practice of his profession in the thriving town of Hohenwald, Dr. 
William Barnabas Tucker is numbered among the representative physi- 
cians of Lewis county and prior to his locating at Hohenwald in 1907, 
was one of the best known membei's of the medical profession in the ad- 
joining county of Perry, where he was a medical practitioner thirty-four 
years. He is a scion of one of the old pioneer families of this common- 
wealth, one that was established here very shortly after Tennessee was 
admitted to statehood and whose members in the interim of a century 
or more have always been identified with the most worthy order of cit- 
izenship in this state. 

A native of Perry county, Tennessee, William Barnabas Tucker was 
born near Linden, December 13, 1852, a son of Robert P. Tucker. The 
latter also was a native of Perry county, where he was born in 1818. 
Joseph Tucker, father of Robert P., was the founder of the family in 
Tennessee and came to this state in 1799 from North Carolina, where 
he was born in 1769, and where he was subsequently married to a Miss 
Glass. On coming to Tennessee he located in Perry county, where he 
spent the remainder of his life in the vocation of a farmer, passing 
away there in 1873. He helped General Jackson demonstrate the order 
of American soldiery at the battle of New Orleans in 1815 and sustained 
a severe wound in that engagement with the British. Of the eight chil- 
dren of his family, Robert was the third in birth. After receiving a 
common school education, Robert also became a tiller of the soil and 
followed agricultural pursuits very successfully throughout his life. In 
political sentiment he was a staunch Democrat and in a fraternal way he 
was affiliated with the Masonic order. His death occurred in 1870. He 
was married in Perry county, Tennessee, to Mary A. Peach, who was 
born in Williamson county, this state, in 1826 and is yet living. Two 
children were born to these parents: Dr. Tucker, of this review and 
John R. Tucker, now living in Perry county. 

Dr. Tucker was educated in the Perry county public schools and in 
the medical department of the University of Nashville and of the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee, attending the former institution two terms and the 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1231 

latter one term. He took the degree of Doctor of Medicine in each, in 
the University of Nashville in 1872, and in 1886, he took additional work 
in the University of Tennessee, receiving again the degree the M. D. In 
fact, throughout his whole medical career, Dr. Tucker has kept abreast 
with every advance made in the science and practice of medicine and 
while no longer representing the younger generation of the profession, 
he retains the keenest interest in the discoveries and progress of this 
science and has besides the invaluable knowledge gained from his own 
long experience. He began the practice of medicine at Linden, Perry 
county in 1873 and continued there thirty-four years, or until 1907, 
when he changed his location to Hohenwald, Lewis county. He is a 
general practitioner and while located in Perry county was a member of 
the Perry County Medical Society. He has always been more or less 
interested in agriculture and still owns a farm. Politically he is an 
adherent of the Democratic party. 

In 1876, Dr. Tucker was married to Miss Louisa Jane Beasley, daugh- 
ter of Beverly Beasley, of Perry county. To Dr. and Mrs. Tucker have 
been born four children, namely: James Thompson Tucker, now of 
Chicago, Illinois; Maude, who became the wife of 0. J. Baars and 
resides in Perry county, Tennessee; Eve, who is at the home of her 
parents ; and William Homer, now a resident of Fort Dodge, Iowa. 

Dr. James Frankijn Whitwell. One of the representative pro- 
fessional men and highly esteemed citizens of Lewis county, Tennessee, 
is Dr. James Franklin Whitwell, who has been a medical practitioner in 
that county for thirty years and has also become well known there 
through considerable county official service. The family to which Dr. 
Whitwell belongs is one of the old connections of Tennessee, as it was 
established here considerably more than a century ago, and he is of the 
third generation native to the soil of this state. DiflFerent of its members 
have held prominent places in the public life of this section and the 
father of Dr. Whitwell gave up his life at the battle of Franklin as a 
loyal defender of his state and the Confederacy during the Civil war. 
The family originated in America with Robert Whitwell, the great- 
grandfather of Dr. Whitwell, who emigrated from England and located 
in Tennessee, settling in Hickman county, where he reared a large fam- 
ily. Rev. Pleasant Whitwell, one of his sons, was born in Hickman 
county in 1803, but after he reached man's estate he removed to Perry 
county, this state, where afterward remained his home and where in an 
industrial way he followed farming. Entering the ministry of the Primi- 
tive Baptist church, he attained considerable note in this connection and 
in his day was one of the strongest believers and exhorters of that faith 
in this country. He was a Democrat in political belief and served as 
clerk of the Perry county court eight years. A son of his, Thomas 
Whitwell, was judge of Perry county sixteen years. Rev. Pleasant 



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1232 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Whitwell married Margaret Anderson, who bore him five children, one 
of whom was Elijah H. Whitwell, the father of Dr. Whitwell. Elijah 
H. Whitwell was born in Perry county, Tennessee, in 1832 and grew 
to manhood there, receiving a public school education. He followed 
farming until the opening of the Civil war, when he enlisted in Hulmes*^ 
company, formed at Linden, Perry county, and assigned to the Forty- 
eighth Tennessee regiment, with which he served until he gave up his 
life on the bloody battlefield of Franklin on November 30, 1864. In 
1851 he was married to Angeline Randall, who was born in Perry county 
January 10, 1834, and died April 13, 1913. To this union were born 
five children, of whom Dr. Whitwell was second in birth and is the eldest 
of four that reached maturity and are yet living. The mother was mar- 
ried later to Joseph Dabbs, a farmer of Perry county. 

James Franklin Whitwell was born near Linden, Perry county^ 
Tennessee, May 9, 1854, and was but a lad of eight years when the 
father's sacrifice to the cause of the Southland deprived him of the 
provident care of that parent. He grew up in the vicinity of his birth 
and attended the public schools of the locality, later becoming a teacher. 
After being engaged in that manner in Perry and Lewis counties for 
some years he began to prepare for the profession he had determined 
should be his permanent line of endeavor and to that purpose began 
the study of medicine under Dr. T. S. Evans in the medical department 
of Vanderbilt University, Nashville, concluding his training in the 
medical department of the University of Tennessee. Beginning the 
active practice of medicine at Riverside, Tennessee, in 1882, he con- 
tinued there until 1896, when he came to his present location at Hohen- 
wald, where he is now well established in practice. Politically he is a 
staunch Democrat and served as registrar of Lewis county twelve years, 
or from 1898 to 1910 ; was secretary of the executive committee of the 
county for several years and has also served as its health officer for a 
number of years. He is much interested in truck gardening and horti- 
culture and keeps in touch with and applies the most advanced ideas in 
regard to each of these lines of cultivation. 

In 1873 Dr. Whitwell was united in marriage to Miss Sophia Grinder, 
daughter of John Grinder, a former citizen of Lewis county, Tennessee. 
To Dr. and Mrs. Whitwell were born two daughters: Nora, who be- 
came the wife of C. M. Paxton and died in 1909, at the age of thirty- 
three, and Cora, whose husband is Andrew Raspbury, an interested 
principal in the mercantile firm of Rasbury & Warren at Hohenwald. 
Dr. and Mrs. Whitwell are both members of the Christi?in church and 
the former is an elder of that denomination. 

Walker W. O'Guin. For three generations at least the O'Guin 
family has been identified with the fortunes and aflfairs of Hickman 
county, Tennessee. Thomas O'Guin, the grandfather of the subject of 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1233 

this sketch, was born in the county, there grew to manhood, married, and 
became a prominent farmer. When the Civil war broke out he cast 
his lot with the Southern Confederacy and entered the army as a 
private soldier. Exposure and hardship incident to military life so 
impaired his health that he died of tuberculosis soon after being dis- 
<;harged from the service, leaving two sons, the younger of which, Sidney 
L. O'Guin, was born near Whitfield, Hickman county, in April, 1863. 
In 1884, S. L. O'Guin and Sarah Coble were united in marriage in 
Lewis county, Tennessee, though she is a native of Hickman county, 
where she was bom in 1856. Three children have been born of this 
xmion — ^Walker W., Alden and Marvin — the first named in Lewis county 
and the other two in Hickman county. In early life S. L. O/Guin fol- 
lowed the vocation of a farmer, but later engaged in mercantile pursuits. 
, He is now the proprietor of a shoe and gents ' furnishing store at Center- 
ville. Politically he is a Democrat, and both he and his wife are mem- 
T)ers of the Christian church. 

Walker W. O'Guin, the eldest of the three children bom to his 
parents, was bom in Lewis county, Tennessee, February 1, 1886, but 
removed with his parents to Hickman county in his early childhood. He 
i^as educated in the Hickman county schools and at the Murray Insti- 
tute, Murray, Kentucky, and until 1909, was engaged in teaching in 
the public schools of Lewis and Hickman counties. In 1909 he entered 
the field of journalism as owner and editor of the Eohenwald Herald. 
On August 18, 1912, the office and equipment of the paper were de- 
^royed by fire, and soon after that Mr. O'Guin removed to Centerville, 
where he became the editor of the Hickman County Citizen. This paper 
has the largest circulation of any newspaper in the county. In national 
politics it is a supporter of Democratic principles, but in state and local 
affairs it is independent. Although Mr. O'Guin has been in charge of 
its editorial columns but a comparatively short time, he has demon- 
strated his grasp of public questions and his ability as a writer. His 
long residence in Hickman county and his familiarity with conditions 
peculiarly qualify him for the position he occupies. He knows the 
needs of the county and is always ready to further any measure for the 
social and material uplift of her citizens. 

In his political affiliations Mr. O'Guin is an unswerving Democrat. 
His fraternal relations are with Hohenwald Camp No. 215, Woodmen 
of the World; Sam Davis Lodge No. 158, K. of P., located at Center- 
ville ; and Centerville Camp M. W. A. In all these orders he is popular 
l)ecause of his genial disposition and good fellowship. 

In 1907 Mr. O'Guin married Miss Ruby Poore, daughter of J. W. 
Poore, a well known resident of Hickman county. Two children have 
^ome to bless this union — Harriet Jane and Sydney Lamar. Mr. and 
Mrs. 'Guin are members of the Christian church and take a commend- 
able interest in promoting its good works. 



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1234 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Ben B. Gillespie. The career of Ben B. Gillespie, of Gallatin, 
Tennessee, presei!its a striking example of enterprise, industry and in- 
tegrity, conducing to eminent success. Reared to the work of the farm, 
he has continued his operations along agricultural lines to such good 
effect that today he is the owner of a handsome property in Sumner 
county, and is known as one of the leading Hereford cattle breeders in 
the state. Mr. Gillespie was bom in Sumner county, Tennessee, Feb- 
ruary 1, 1860, and is a son of Richard G. and Susan C. (Harris) 
Gillespie. 

The Gillespie family was founded in America during the middle of 
the eighteenth century by one James Gillespie, who came to this county 
from Scotland. From him descended Jacob Gillespie, the grandfather of 
Ben B., who was born in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee at an 
early date. He served in the War of 1812, under General Jackson, was 
known as a mighty hunter, and eventually entered land from the g:ov- 
emment and spent the rest of his life in farming in Tennessee, dying 
full of years and in the possession of a handsome competency. Richard 
G. Gillespie was born in Sumner county in 1826, and spent his entire 
life in agricultural pursuits, being exceedingly successful in his opera- 
tions and accumulating 1,400 acres of land. He was one of the founders 
of the First National Bank of Gallatin, and a director for years, and all 
movements of a progressive nature could depend upon his support. He 
was an enthusiastic member of the A. F. & A. M., and in his political 
views was a stalwart Democrat. His death occurred in March, 1903. 
Mr. Gillespie married Susan C. Harris, who was born in Sumner county 
in 1833, daughter of Bright and Sallie (Walton) Harris, natives of 
North Carolina. Mr. Harris was a stone mason by trade, and made his 
way to Kentucky, and thence to Tennessee, with a kit of tools on his 
shoulder, but lived to attain to eminent success. Mrs. Gillespie survives 
her husband and lives with her son, Ben B., who was the fourth of her 
six children. She is a woman of many Christian virtues, and has been 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church all of her life. 

Ben B. Gillespie received his education in the public schools of 
Sumner county, following which he attended the University of Tennessee, 
at Knoxville. On his return to the home farm he resumed agricultural 
pursuits, which he has followed ever since, and is now the owner of a 
well-cultivated property of 300 acres. Mr. Gillespie has given his at- 
tention during late years to the breeding of thoroughbred Hereford 
cattle, making a specialty of traveling all over the fair circuit. The 
year 1912 was a most successful one, as he returned to his farm without 
an animal, whereas he had started out with a large herd. His animals 
bring top prices, and a long list of ribbons testify eloquently to their 
success as prize winners. About forty head are raised annually, all 
pure breed, and many of these are disposed of through mail orders. Mr. 
Gillepsie is known as an excellent judge of stock, and his advice is often 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1235 

sought, and freely given, in matters pertaining thereto. During a long 
experience, he has come in contact with men in every walk of life, and 
the high esteem in which he is universally held, gives evidence of his 
integrity in business matters. 

In November, 1887, Mr. Gillespie was united in marriage with Anna 
Lou McGabock, daughter of John McGabock, a retired farmer of Scotch- 
Irish descent, who is now living in Nashville. Mr. and Mrs. Gillespie 
have had two children : Nellie and Frank W., both living at home. Mrs. 
Gillespie is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Gillespie 
has shown some interest in fraternal work, being a member of the Loyal 
Order of Moose. In his political belief he is a Democrat. He is at this 
time steward in the Methodist Episcopal church, and for more than a 
quarter of a century has served as superintendent of the Sunday school. 

Frank H. Dunkijn, M. D. During a practice in medicine of more 
than a quarter of a century, most of which has been passed in Sumner 
county. Dr. Dunklin has utilized many opportunities for devoted public 
service, and at the same time has been held in the high esteem of his 
fellow citizens. His home for many years has been in the country near 
Gallatin, on Rural Route No. 3, and his practice has been very largely 
among the rural communities. His professional associates regard him 
as one of the best doctors in Sumner county, and this appreciation was 
borne out by the success which has always attended his efforts. 

Dr. Dunklin was born in Lowndes county, Alabama, May 24, 1863, 
the son of Thomas W. and Martha (Crumpton) Dunklin. On the 
maternal side the family was from Virginia, and most of its members 
were identified with the service of the church, a brother of Dr. Dunk- 
lin's mother, having been one of the most prominent divines in Alabama. 
The paternal grandfather, William Dunklin, was bom in North Carolina, 
whence he moved into Alabama and there lived and died. The family 
was originaUy from England. 

Thomas W. Dunklin, the father, was born in South Carolina in 1812, 
and his death occurred 1877. His wife was born in Alabama in 1818, 
and died in 1881. From South Carolina the father, when a youth, ac- 
companied his parents to Alabama, where he became a successful planter. 
He owned a great deal of wealth in slaves and other property, and at the 
time of the war invested in quantities of the Confederate bonds. The 
outcome of the war resulted disastrously to his financial standing, though 
he always provided well for his children. He and his wife were the 
parents of ten children, of whom the doctor was the youngest. William 
James, the oldest child, served four years as a Confederate soldier, and 
the test of his gallant service was the five different wounds he received. 
The parents were very interested members of the Missionary Baptist 
church, in which the father was deacon for years. He was a member of 
the Masonic order, and in politics a Democrat. 



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1236 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Dr. Frank H. Dunklin attended the common schools of Alabama and 
the preparatory school of Greenville in that state. In 1884 he entered 
the University of Tennessee, from which he was graduated M. D. in 1886. 
The same year he entered upon active practice in this state, then spent 
two years in Alabama, and since 1889 has made his permanent home in 
Sumner county. He was a poor man when his professional career began 
in this county, and he has been so fortunate as to acquire a position of 
substantial comfort and affluence. He is owner of a fine farm of three 
hundred acres besides considerable bank stock. 

In October, 1887, occurred his marriage to Miss Mar>' Bell, daughter 
of John W. Bell. Her father was born and reared in Sumner county, ' 
where during his active career he came to own an estate of five hundred 
acres and was known as one of the most successful farmers and stockmen 
of the. county. The doctor and wife are the parents of two children : 
F. B., who is studying medicine in Vanderbilt University at Nashville ; 
and K. B., who is manager on his father's farm. Dr. Dunklin and wife 
are members of the Methodist church South. He is ^ Democrat in 
politics, has been a member of the county Democratic executive com- 
mittee, and has served as chairman of the county board of education. 
He is a member of the county and state medical societies, and the Ameri- 
can Medical Association. He has been president of the county medical 
society, and at the present time is president of the Sumner County 
Health League. 

Robert W. Caldwell, of Gallatin, has now served a decade as cir- 
cuit clerk of Sumner county and has proved a most capable and efficient 
official, the length of his service being indicative of his standing in the 
public estimation of this county both as an official and as a citizen. 
Here he has maintained his home from the time of his nativity and 
always has been identified with the best citizenship of the county, his 
own sterling qualities adding prominence to a name that has been known 
and respected in this locality for more than a century. The family 
originated in this state with Hardy Caldwell, a native of North Carolina, 
who came into the state in a very early day. His son, William, born 
October 10, 1807, in Sumner county, became a well-to-do farmer and 
reared a large family. Hardy Caldwell, son of William and the father 
of our subject, was bom June 1. 1831, and passed away January 15, 
1912, in the locality in which he had lived for a little more than four 
score years. His whole active career was spent as a farmer and he was 
very successful in that vocation, leaving to his children at his death, an 
estate of several hundred acres. He was numbered among Tennessee's 
gallant defenders in the Civil war and as a member of the Twentieth 
Tennessee Regiment, he fought at Mill Springs, Shiloh, Murfreesboro 
and Chickamauga, being wounded in his foot at the battle of Shiloh. 
He served from 1861 until his capture at the battle of Chickamauga in 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1237 

1863, and from that time until the close of the war he was held a cap- 
tive in the Federal prison at Rock Island, Illinois. On being released 
he returned to his home in Sumner county, Tennessee, and began life 
anew, resuming his occupation of farming. His entire life was marked 
by the deeds of a patriotic, public-spirited citizen and he so lived as to 
hold a secure place in the confidence and esteem of his community. He 
was a member of the Masonic fraternity and in politics was a stalwart 
Democrat. A valued member of the Methodist Episcopal church, he was 
one of its most energetic workers in this county, having served for years 
as a Sunday school superintendent and also having served as trustee 
and steward in the church of his membership. He wedded Miss Frances 
Markcum, a native daughter of Tennessee, who was bom January 19, 
1844, and yet survives her husband. She, too, is an earnest and devout 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. There were six children 
bom to this union. Robert W., the eldest and one of five now living, 
was bom in Siimner county, April 29, 1867. Educated first in the 
public schools of his native county and then in a private boarding school 
at Willette, Macon county, Mr. Caldwell began independent activity as 
a teacher and taught in public schools for seventeen years. In 1902 he 
was elected clerk of the circuit court and has served in that oflSce con- 
tinuously and acceptably to all concerned to the present time. 

On October 12, 1898, Mr. Caldwell was joined in marriage to Miss 
Willie Barnes, whose father is William Barnes, a native and a well 
known and successful farmer of Sumner county. This union has been 
blessed with seven children, named: Rowena F., Ruel A., Stella M., 
Alleen, William B., Robert W., and Joseph A., the first four of whom 
are now attending school. Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, South, and he unites fraternally with the 
Woodmen of the World, of which order he now is council commander 
in his local lodge. As a Democrat he has long taken an active part in 
the local political affairs of his party. He owns a good farm in this 
county and also owns town property. As teacher, official and agricul- 
turist he has put energy and intelligence into his efforts and in each 
line of endeavor has attained definite success. 

Henry Clay Richardson. The profession of law and the realm of 
politics are substantially represented in Dickson by Hon. Henry Clay 
Richardson, who is a native of this county and whose progenitors have 
for three preceding generations been associated with this part of Ten- 
nessee. They have constituted a family line notable for military vigor 
and other strong characteristics. 

Austin Richardson (the great-grandfather of our subject) joined the 
Revolutionary army when a mere boy, following his father and five 
uncles to the exciting scenes of that conflict. They had gone thither 
from their home at Culpepper Courthouse, Virginia, but only Austin 

Vol. V— 3 



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1238 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Richardson returned, ^or the others had fallen in battle or died from 
other ills of war, and only this youth and one brother were left to rep- 
resent the family. In spite of the fact that he had taken part in the 
great war and had served under Washington, he was then but an orphan 
boy and was ** bound out*' until he reached the years of his majority. 
When he became his own master, he left Virginia and came to Tennessee 
in 1793, first settling at Greenville. Here he married a Miss Johnson 
and three years later they removed to the part of the state which is now 
Dickson county, selecting as their home one of the highest points in the 
county and one near a large spring. His was a large family, one of his 
sons being Louis Richardson, born in 1807 in Dickson county. He became 
a prominent farmer and married Miss Vina Walker of Hickman county. 
Their son, W. Turner Richardson (the father of H. C. Richardson) was 
born in Hickman county, in 1843, and early displayed a thirst for ad- 
venture and action. At the age of seventeen years he ran away from 
home and joined the Confederate Army, serving in Company K, of the 
Eleventh Tennessee Infantry. He served under Johnson and Hood in 
all engagements ; was captured at Missionary Ridge ; was held prisoner 
at Bock Island prison iij Illinois; was exchanged at Greensborough, 
North Carolina; and after the close of the war returned to the occupa- 
tion of peace. He was a farmer and a dealer in lumber and lime, con- 
ducting a large kiln and managing a large business in that line. In 
1866 he married Miss Emily Catherine Alspaugh, who was a native of 
North Carolina, born in 1841 ; her mother was the youngest daughter of 
Colonel Josiah Clifton, a large land owner and colonel in the Revolution- 
ary war. He was at Torktown with Washington when Comwallis sur- 
rendered. To Emily C. Alspaugh Richardson and W. T. Richardson 
were bom twelve children, eight of whom lived to the years of maturity. 
The eldest of these was H. C. Richardson, who was bom in the town 
of Bums, in Dickson county, Tennessee, on the twenty-first day of 
March, 1867. 

Henry Clay Richardson early evinced an intellectual keenness sug- 
gestive of that of his distinguished namesake. He was educated in 
Edgewood College, and then fared forth upon the professional pathway 
of teaching. Like many other young men of ability, he found it possible 
to give due attention to his pedagogical labors and in his hours of leisure 
to broaden his own mind by carrying on independent study. The line 
which Mr. Richardson chose for further mental development and 
advancement in life was that of law. Meanwhile, however, he became an 
authority on county educational matters and his personal standing was 
such that for two years his services were required as superintendent of 
public instruction for Dickson county. 

In 1891 Mr. Richardson wrote his bar examinations and was ad- 
mitted to practice in Tennessee. The quality of his professional activ- 
ity m^y be readily guessed from the fact that recognition of his ability 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1239 

was indicated by his district in sending him to the state legislature in 
1894. Hon. Richardson served for four years as a representative and 
then turned to his home and practiced in Dickson. He is a stanch 
Democrat and has been very active in the affairs of his party. 

Numerous fraternal organizations count Mr. Richardson a valued 
member. He is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; of the Knights of Pythias; 
and of the Improved Order of Red Men. Mr. Richardson is socially 
popular as well as professionally successful. 

N. W. True. Both prominent and eflScient as an abstract attorney 
and as county surveyor, N. W. True enjoys a wide measure of popularity 
among the citizens of Springfield and of Robertson county in general. 
This young man is a lifelong resident of the county, his birth having 
occurred here on November 14, 1879 ; of his parents, F. M. and Harriet 
(Bigbee) True, extended account is given in the biographical sketch of 
H. C. True, appearing elsewhere in these pages. 

The public schools of Robertson county provided the mental equip- 
ment of N. W. True, so far as formal school training may accomplish 
that end. He turned to definite purpose all such opportunities, also 
taking advantage of all other intellectual material that came in his way. 
To such a youth openings are ever at hand, and Mr. True first occupied 
himself as a self-supporting young man, with the duties of deputy 
court clerk. 

^Ir. True's specialty is that of abstracts and titles, in relation to 
which his accurate legal knowledge is of great value to his clients. His 
office practice is very large and his business in connection therewith 
makes it necessary that he investigate estates at considerable distance 
from Springfield. He is therefore thoroughly familiar with Robertson 
county and with the surrounding counties as well. 

In 1912 Mr. True was honored with election to the office of surveyor 
for Robertson county, a position which he is well qualified to fill, and 
the duties of which he discharges with competent ability. 

The Democratic party is that of Mr. True's allegiance and its fortunes 
are a matter of great moment to him. His activities in behalf of the 
great political camp of Democracy are particularly enthusiastic at the 
periods of campaign movements, his party work taking him into all 
parts of the state. Political leaders look to Mr. True as one of the 
strong coming men in civic work. 

In addition to the interests of his profession and* political work, 
N. W. True is one of the leading members of the secret societies of 
Springfield. The Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights 
of Pythias share his fraternal aflSliations. He is tireless in his attention 
to both his public and personal business operations. Mr. True has thus 
far been the creator of his own success and bids fair to be one of the 



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1240 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

makers of ''The New South/' He was married in 1912 to Miss Maud 
Tipps, of Tullohoma, Tennessee. 

Mayor Pitt Henslee. Not only is Hon. Pitt Henslee variously 
prominent in financial affairs in Dickson, but he is the present incum- 
bent of the highest local office in the gift of the city, an honor which he 
well deserves for his many services to the municipality. 

Mayor Henslee is a son of Dr. J. T. Henslee (1838-1895), the latter 
a Kentuckian by birth, a graduate in medicine at Vanderbilt University, 
a practitioner at Hollow Rock, Tennessee, and in Dickson county, besides 
three years' professional activity in Texas. He was a Baptist, a Mason 
and a Democrat and had served in youth as a Confererate soldier under 
Gteneral Forrest. He married in 1870, Miss Mary Lipe (1852-1873), a 
native of Carroll county. They were the parents of but one child — ^the 
son of whom we now write as Mayor Henslee. Dr. Henslee 's second 
marriage was with Miss Dora Pickler of Hollow Rock, and three children 
have in the succeeding years been bom to them. 

It was on August 18, 1871, that Pitt Henslee was bom in Carroll 
county, Tennessee. After his elementary education in the public schools 
of Dickson, he studied in Bethel College at McKenzie, and for one year 
— because of troublesome eyesight — ^was a student in the School for the 
Blind, at Nashville. 

Mr. Henslee is possessed of a gift for mercantile and other com- 
mercial operations. He is the president of the Henslee Dry Gtoods Com- 
pany ; he is a director of the Cumberland Valley National Bank of Nash- 
ville; he is associated with the S. G. Holland S^ove Company of that 
city. But his greatest financial achievements have been in connection 
with the First National Bank of Dickson, of which he was first presi- 
dent and founder. Its capital is rated at $50,000 ; its surplus at $11,000 ; 
and its average deposits at $250,000. 

Another line in which he has shown his unusual ability is that of 
publishing a local newspaper. As president and manager of the Dick- 
son County Herald, he has been responsible for the virile character of 
that eight-page sheet of news and editorial exposition. Mr. Henslee is 
a Democrat in politics and has been honored by his constitutency with 
election to the Tennessee legislature, the date of his period of service 
being from 1899 to 1912. During his incumbency special chancery and 
circuit courts were established in Dickson. It was on September 12, of 
the latter year that his townspeople evinced their confidence in him and 
their esteem for him by electing him the next mayor of Dickson. 

The mayor's home is graced by the presence of Susie Spencer Hen- 
slee, his wife. Mrs. Henslee is a daughter of the Reverend Samuel 
Spencer of Spencer Mill. The date of her marriage to Pitt Henslee 
was 1899. In the ensuing years a small son, named Lipe, has been 
born to them. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1241 

The Baptist church is the religious denomination with which the 
mayor and his wife are formally connected and to which they give 
their special support, Mr. Henslee being one of the trustees of this 
church. The members of four different secret societies also claim his 
fraternal interest; these are the Independent Order of Odd Fellows — 
Harmony Lodge; the Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons — Number 
468 Dickson; the Modem Woodmen of America and the Junior Order 
of United American Mechanics. No citizen of Dickson, public or private, 
is the object of greater esteem or warmer friendship than the successful, 
but kindly and genial Pitt Henslee. \ 

George Dahnke. In Union City, Dahnke enterprise and energy has 
become so intimately intertwined with the business and civic activities 
within the last two decades that the most casual review of the business 
life of the city would be incomplete without reference to the Dahnke 
brothers. 

Gkorge Dahnke started out to make his own way when thirteen years 
old without money, and came a stranger to Union City as a journeyman 
baker, and has worked his way up until today he is at the head of about 
all the important industries of the county, and by big odds is the 
most prominent and active business man of the state. 

Mr. Dahnke is a native of Nashville, Illinois. He was born Sep- 
tember 29, 1866, a son of H. F. and Katherine (Benner) Dahnke. His 
youthful days he spent in clerking in his native town, and from clerk- 
ing he turned his attention to the bakery business. This he followed 
at Nashville until 1887, and landed in Union City, October 8, of that 
year, a journeyman baker. He worked three months; at the end of 
which time he bought out the establishment where he had been em- 
ployed, opening a restaurant and bakery. In 1888, he added a confec- 
tionery department to his growing business, which has kept pace with 
the progress of the times, and the t)ahnke cafe has a conspicuous place 
in the activities of Union City. 

In 1900, when the Dahnke-Walker Milling Company was organized 
he was made its manager, and has since continued at the head of the firm 
with the result that at this writing the Dahnke-Walker Milling Com- 
pany is not only the largest concern of its kind in Obion county, but it 
ranks among the largest in Tennessee. The plant covers about five 
acres on the Mobile and Ohio Railroad and has a capacity for turning 
out fourteen hundred barrels of flour and meal per day. The best and 
latest improved machinery is installed, a force of fifty hands are em- 
ployed, a capital of fifty-thousand dollars is used in carrying on the 
business, and the company's trade extends to territory in the states of 
Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, and in fact all of the south- 
eastern states. An approximate estimate of the grain shipped by the 
plant would be about two thousand cars. In addition to this mill the 



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1242 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

company has another of equally large capacity where coarse feed is 
ground. 

The ice company was organized in 1891 and operated at a loss, and 
came to the end of its resources in 1896. In that year the stock was 
sold to George Dahnke and brother for less than half its original value, 
and Greorge Dahnke then became president and manager of the com- 
pany, a position he has since retained. This ice plant has a capacity 
of two thousand tons storage, and manufactures fifteen tons of ice per 
day. The present company is known as the Union City Ice & Coal Com- 
pany, several years ago dealing in coal. The plant covers an area of 
two acres. 

Another important industry which Mr. Dahnke promoted is the 
Union City Cotton Gin, which w^as established in 1908, and is doing a 
prosperous business. A conspicuous fact about Mr. Dahnke is his 
ability as a reorganizer. He has taken a number of concerns in this 
vicinity, recognized as complete failures, and has injected life and vi- 
tality into them, until they have all become very successful under his 
direction. Mr. Dahnke is a director in Union City Canning Company, 
the Third National Bank of Union City, the Obion Land & Improve- 
ment Company, and the Obion County Fair Association. 

A year ago at the meeting of the Business Men's Club, Mr. Dahnke 
proposed that they get an expert soil doctor to increase the average 
yield of grain per acre. He was appointed a committee of one to 
organize the proposition, which he did, as more fully explained in later 
paragraphs, was made president of the resulting organization, wrote to 
all the leading agricultural colleges in the United States, and finally 
succeeded in getting an expert to take charge of the technical end of 
the business. This was the first county in the state of Tennessee to have 
such an organization, and Mr. Dahnke was the man whose original 
enterprise accomplished the deed. He is the leading factor and director 
of the Obion River Drainage Company, formed for the purpose of re- 
claiming about fifty-seven thousand acres of the most fertile land in 
Obion county, by a system of leveeing and drainage, the undertaking 
including the straightening the channel of Obion river. One of the 
drainage districts has been organized, its bonds sold, and the work well 
toward prosperous completion. 

Socially Mr. Dahnke affiliates with the Masonic order, the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Knights of Pythias, and the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. He is, as already mentioned, one of 
the influential members of the Business Men's Club of Union City, 
and is at the present time its president. His religious creed is that of 
the Lutheran church, and in politics he is a Democrat, but has never 
assented to become a candidate for office, ^tr. Dahnke was married 
November 25, 1891, to Miss Eleanor Hoffman. They are the parents 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1243 

of eight children, namely: Catherine, Louise, Mary, Helen, Nellie, 
Ruth, Marjorie, and George Jr., all of whom are at home. 

From the preceding paragraphs it will be understood that Mr. 
Dahnke is a man of very exceptional ability. He is one of those who 
possess *'life and leading" and whose services are indispensable in 
twentieth century progress. As an addition to the. somewhat formal 
biography already written, the value of this article will be enhanced 
by the following estimate of his work and influence, written by one who 
has observed the career of Mr. Dahnke and his public spirited activity, 
and is thus in a position to judge and appreciate this forceful business 
leader. 

Mr. Dahnke comes of stout old German stock, and he possesses in 
his make-up and general character the many notable qualities that have 
made Germans potent factors in the history of civifization. We note that 
Mr. Dahnke is what he is. He is frankness personified. We do not 
believe there is a particle of insincerity or hypocrisy in him. Because 
of this and because of his veracity, his unusual, we might truthfully 
say, his extraordinary determination of character, he is recognized 
as the soul and center of Union City's business interest. He is presid- 
ing officer of the Business Men's Club, and has been for several years. 
He enjoys the profoundest confidence of the business man. He is con- 
stantly revolving in his mind some worthy plan for benefitting Union 
City and Obion county. He is big and broad enough to work not only 
for Union City, but for all of Obion county. He is a self-made man. He 
came to Union City a few years ago, a penniless young stranger. His 
favorite saying is that a man's business is no bigger than the man him- 
self. He established a bakery and cafe. Humble as this business was, 
he gave it prestige and honor and dignity, and gave Union City an 
institution that is one of its brightest and most successful ornaments — 
the justly famous Dahnke Cafe. 

He acquired a majority of the stock in a run-down, dilapitated ice 
factory, and he overhauled and revamped it, stamped it with the stamp 
of success, and fine executive ability and made it, too, one of the lead- 
ing institutions of Union City. He next bought a leading interest in an 
unsuccessful flouring mill proposition. He overhauled this business, 
he made a patient, exhaustive, laborious analysis of what had caused its 
failure. He modernized the machinery, he made a practical study of 
grain, and the Dahnke- Walker Milling Company is the product of his 
labor, one of the most successful milling enterprises in the middle west 
or in the south. 

Mr. Dahnke, as the president of the Business Men's Club, was the 
first to suggest the advisability and the possibility of ** curing" the 
'*sick" soil of Obion county. He it was who was first heard to mention 
the constantly increasing yield of wheat and corn year by year. It 
was Mr. Dahnke who made the call for the farmers to meet and effect 



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1244 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

organization and secure funds for the employment of a soil doctor. 
The meeting of farmers was held in the court house of Obion county, 
and the organization was made the Obion County Agricultural Improve- 
ment Association. Mr. Dahnke in recognition of the deep interest he 
had shown in soil improvement was by the farmers assembled, elected 
president of the association. Mr. Dahnke put his shoulder to the wheel 
and used his personal influence to bear upon the concern, inducing 
the farmers to assist in getting up the needful funds. He also came 
into touch with the great national organization that had been effected 
to bring about soil improvements, and increased crop production. All 
his efforts were crowned with success. The money was made up, the 
agricultural expert secured, and Obion county put in line with the 
foremost and most aggressive counties in the United States. Mr. Dahnke 
secured a visit from the famous D. Ward King, and as a result of Mr. 
King's teachings the compulsory use of the King Road-drag has been 
incorporated into the road law of Obion county. 

But, perhaps, Mr. Dahnke 's greatest work was the part he took in 
the creation of several drainage districts in Obion county, in Obion 
river valley. When others doubted and quibbled and found fault, Mr. 
Dahnke with serene confidence and unwavering faith and fidelity held 
firmly to the absolute feasibility of the draining plan. This enterprise, 
too, has been crowned with success, the bonds have been negotiated, 
and work will at an early date begin on the drainage of one district, 
the forerunner of other drainage districts, whose reclaiming will add 
millions of dollars to the resources of Tennessee. This brief sketch will, 
we believe, fully suflBce to show that Mr. Dahnke is not only a live-wire 
as a business proposition, but a broad, useful, public spirited citizen. 

Capt. Chas. Sanders Dougl.vss, A. B., A. M. Prominent among the 
educators of Tennessee is Capt. Chas. Sanders Douglass, who for 
twenty-five years has been superintendent of the city schools of Gallatin 
and in various other relations has been a prominent and influential 
factor in the educational affairs of this state for over forty years. This 
long identification alone is ample evidence of his efficiency in educational 
work and of his character and standing as a man. The Douglass family 
trace their lineage to the bold, sturdy Scotch-Irish stock. Firm and 
dauntless, loyal, conservative and honorable, are the characteristics that 
marked this race in the mother country, traits that were not lost by 
emigration and residence in this land of freedom and adventure. Back 
in the colonial period three brothers emigrated from their native Scot- 
land to the United States, one locating in middle Tennessee, another in 
Virginia, while the third settled in North Carolina. Stephen A. Doug- 
las, the American statesman and politician, was descended from this 
connection. From the North Carolina ancestor was descended James 
Douglass, born in North Carolina in 1762, who was the grandfather of 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1245 

Capt. C. S. Douglass of this review. In young manhood he came to 
Tennessee, where he married in 17 — . He passed away in this state in 
1851 at the venerable age of eighty-nine years. His son, Col. Young 
Douglass, was bom in Sumner county, Tennessee, in 1805 and followed 
farming up to his marriage in 1834 to Benetta Rawlings, after which 
he took up merchandising. Later he returned to agricultural pursuits 
and wajs quite successful in that line of endeavor until his death in 1865. 
He was captain of one of the first military companies organized in 
Sumner county and it was from this connection that he received his 
familiar appellation of Colonel Douglass. Benetta (Rawlings) Douglass 
was bom in Sumner county, Tennessee, in 1813, a daughter of Dr. Ben- 
jamin Rawlings, who was a pioneer physician in middle Tennessee. She 
passed away in 1849, the mother of six children, the third of whom is 
Capt. C. S. Douglass of this review. After her death Colonel Douglass 
married Mrs. D. Killebrew, nee Green. 

Capt. Chas. S. Douglass was born in Sumner county in 1839. His 
preliminary education was received in the country schools of this county 
and his collegiate training was received at Central University, Danville, 
Kentucky, from which institution he was graduated in 1860 as a Bachelor 
of Arts. The degree of Master of Arts was conferred on him by the 
same institution in 1884. After completing his literary education he 
took up the study of law, but soon discontinued it, however, for at the 
opening of the war between the states at about that time his fealty to 
the South was promptly evinced. He was one of the organizers of 
Company H of the Thirtieth Tennessee Infantry, and in the beginning 
was at once commissioned adjutant, with the title of first-lieutenant. At 
the battle of Fort Donelson in February, 1862, he was captured and 
taken to Camp Chase, from whence he was later transferred to John- 
son's island, being held as a prisoner seven months. On his release he 
returned to the Confederate service as captain of Company H of the 
Thirtieth Tennessee Regiment, Army of Tennessee, and having lost most 
of his company was afterward appointed an adjutant general, in which 
capacity he served during the remainder of the war. Besides the action 
at Fort Donelson, he participated at Jackson and Raymond, Mississippi ; 
at Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge in Tennessee; at Resaca, 
Georgia, and in all the other engagements of the Western army under 
Hood and Johnston. At the battle of Jonesboro he was wounded in 
the left arm and had a horse shot from under him. Throughout the 
whole of his service he exhibited the highest of soldierly qualities. At 
the close of the war he returned to Sumner county, where on July 23, 
1865, he wedded Susan Graham, who was born in Sumner county in 
1846 and is a daughter of Dr. Alexander Graham. The two children 
of their union are: Ada, who became the wife of Dr. C. W. Meguiar, 
now president of the Kentucky examining board in dentistry, and 
Charles Clair Douglass, who resides in California. 



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1246 TENNESSEE AND TENNBSSEANS 

In 1871 Captain Douglass, together with Prof. C. W. Callender, 
organized the Sumner high school in Hendersonville, Tennessee, but two 
years later Prof. Callender was elected superintendent of public instruc- 
tion in Sumner county and for seven years thereafter Captain Douglass 
continued alone as principal of the school. During that time he also 
filled the unexpired term of another instructor in a male seminary at 
Oallatin. In 1880 he was elected superintendent of public instruction 
in Sumner county, and in 1884 and 1885 he was also principal of the 
normal school at Gallatin. He was yet serving as county superintendent 
when he was elected superintendent of the city schools of Gallatin in 
1888, a position that he has now held continuously for twenty-five years. 
Further mention of his position in public esteem in Gallatin is barely 
necessary in this connection, for this long service alone speaks more 
eloquently than words in this respect. He is a member of the Ten- 
nessee State Teachers Association, has served as its vice-president and 
as a member of its executive committee, and in 1883 was president of 
that body. He has served nineteen years as a member of the state 
board of education, was president of the board one terra, a^d was a 
member of the committee that adopted the first uniform text books for 
the state; he also was the first president of the Teachers and Officers 
Association of Tennessee. He was for twenty years conductor of State 
Institutes. 

In political sentiment he is a staunch Democrat, and in 1878 was a 
candidate for the state legislature but was defeated by eighteen votes. 
As a Confederate veteran he became a charter member of Donaldson 
Bivouac, of G«llatin; was its president one term, and has been its 
secretary seventeen years. He and his wife are members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, south, at Gallatin, and he is now serving his second 
year as president of the County Sunday Schools. As a citizen, soldier and 
educator he has lived up to high ideals and his life and services have 
been those of one of the most worthy of Tennesseeans. 

Thomas W. Hunter. Superintendent of public instruction in Sum- 
ner county, Thomas W. Hunter is an educator who upholds the highest 
standards of efficiency in the school service of the county. To gain his 
own education he went in debt, and he advanced to a place of influence 
in relation to the public welfare through his own vigorous efforts. It 
has been his endeavor in his present work to guide the young people of 
the county to the channels of state education, the facilities which in his 
own boyhood, he was so painfuUy in want of. Mr. Hunter is one of 
the leading educatoi's of northern Tennessee. 

A native of Sumner county, he was born on a farm September 3, 
1875, a son of Thomas M. and Ellen (Wallace) Hunter, both of whom 
were natives of Sumner county, the father born here in 1853 and the 
mother in 1856. Both families have been long identified with this sec- 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1247 

tion of tl;e state. The maternal grandfather, whose name was Duncan 
Wallace, was bom in Sumner county. On the paternal side, the founder 
of the Hunter family in Tennessee, was the great-grandfather of the 
present superintendent of public instruction. His name was Lewis 
Hunter, a native of Virginia, who when a young man came into Ten- 
nessee and thus established the family in this locality. His opposition 
to slavery caused him to leave his slaves behind in Virginia, they being 
turned over to his brother. A son of Lewis Hunter was also named 
Thomas M., who was born in Sumner county and spent all his life there 
on a farm. Two of his sons, named Frank and Lewis, were soldiers in 
the Civil war, and Frank rose to the rank of brigadier-general. Thomas 
Miller Hunter, the father, was reared and educated in Sumner county, 
where he and his wife have spent all their lives, and their home is now 
on the old farm in the Eleventh district, where his grandfather settled 
on first coming from Virginia. Farming as a vofcation has been rea- 
sonably successful to him and along with a fair degree of material 
prosperity he has also enjoyed the thorough esteem of his fellow citizens 
He and his wife were the parents of five children, four of whom are now 
living, and Thomas W. is the oldest. Both parents are members of the 
Methodist church, the father being a Democrat, and they have lived 
quiet and unassuming lives, taking a considerable interest in church 
affairs, but otherwise not participating largely in the public affairs of 
their community. 

Thomas W. Hunter was educated in the Tullatuskee College at Beth 
Page, Tennessee, and he continued his studies at Hartsville, this state. 
His career as teacher had already begun before he finished college. His 
first school was at Gumwood, Macon county, where he taught for a time, 
then was engaged by the directors in Sumner county, where he taught 
five months in the year and spent five months in furthering his own 
education. In 1910 occurred his election to the oflSce of superintendent 
of public instruction for the county, and during the past two years he 
has made a notable record in improving methods and securing the 
systematic cooperation of all parties concerned, which is a factor of the 
greatest importance in facilitating the perfect service of local schools. 

Mr. Hunter has also been known to the citizens of this county as a 
merchant, having been associated with his brother in 1903-9 in a store, 
but in the latter year he sold his interest to his brother Though start- 
ing his career in debt for his education he has long since put himself 
even on that score and has acquired from year to year a gratifying 
increase of material prosperity. 

Mr. Hunter was married December 28, 1897, to Miss OUie Smithson, 
a daughter of M. Smithson, a farmer of Sumner county. Mrs. Hunter 
died in 1906, leaving one son named Dewey, now in school. In 1909 
Mr. Hunter was united in marriage with Mary L. Montgomery, a daugh- 
ter of James Montgomery, a native of Sumner county and in former 



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1248 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

years a lawyer, and also a soldier during the Civil war. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hunter are the parents of one child, William Hutchison, now two years 
of age. Mrs. Hunter is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian 
church, and he belongs to the Methodist church. His fraternal aflSlia- 
tions are with the Masonic order, belonging to Beach Camp Lodge No. 
240, A. F. & A. M., at Shackle Island, Tennessee. In politics he is a 
Democrat. 

Edward Albright, lawyer and editor of the Sumner County News 
at Gallatin, represents two of the old and respected family connections 
of Sumner county, Tennessee, the Albrights and the Guthries, both of 
which have been established here well toward a century and have given 
to Tennessee men and women of sterling worth. The Albright family 
originated here with Thomas Albright, a native of North Carolina who 
removed from there' to Kentucky, thence to Tennessee, and finally be- 
came a resident of Illinois, where he passed away. One of his sons is 
John W. Albright, the father of Edward, a Confederate veteran of the 
Civil war and a well known farmer citizen of Sumner county. John W. 
Albright was bom in Kentucky in 1843 and came to Sumner county, 
Tennessee, when a child. He was but a youth in his teens at the opening 
of the Civil war, nevertheless he spent four years fighting bravely for 
the Southern cause, and as a member of Company I of the Twenty- 
fourth Tennessee Eegiment he served in the battles of Shiloh, Perry- 
ville, Murfreesboro and all of the principal engagements of the Tennessee 
campaigns, but was never wounded or captured. After the close of the 
war he returned to Sumner county and took up the vocation of farm- 
ing, which he has since followed, residing on the farm which has been 
in the family since 1796. In fraternal associations he is a Mason and 
has served as master of his lodge. Politically he is a stanch Democrat, 
and in an official way has served as a justice of the peace. He wedded 
Caldonia Guthrie, who was bom in Sumner county, Tennessee, in 1850 
and is a daughter of James I. Guthrie, a native of North Carolina and 
one of the early settlers in Sumner county, Tennessee. She is a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church. John W. and Caldonia (Guthrie) 
Albright have three children living, namely : Edward Albright of this 
review; Oscar Albright, who assists in the management of the home 
farm; and Clemmie, who is now Mrs. Luther Franklin and resides in 
Sumner county. 

Edward Albright, a native of Sumner county, was bom August 18, 
1873. He was educated at Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tennessee, 
from which institution he was graduated in law in 1898. For eight 
years thereafter he was an active practitioner at the Gallatin bar and 
still continues in that line of professional labor, but since 1907, at 
which time he purchased the Sumner County News, he has given the 
major portion of his attention to the management of this publication 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1249 

and to his editorial duties in connection therewith. As a writer of 
considerable ability, he is exceptionally well qualified for this line of 
professional activity, and in this connection it may be mentioned that 
he is the author of Early History of Middle Tennessee, that is con- 
sidered a work of much merit and has been well received. The Sumner 
County News was established in 1897, is a weekly publication and is 
now circulated to about 2,000 subscribers, being one of the most success- 
ful papers of Sumner county. Democratic in politics, under the able 
management of its editor it wields a strong influence in the political 
affairs of Sumner county, but while Mr. Albright thus gives stanch 
support to his Democratic friends he has never himself been a candidate 
for official honors. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias and has 
been chancellor commander of his lodge for the last four years. 

Rupus L. RocHELL. In a work of this character, it is eminently 
proper that due notice be given to those men who, beginning life with 
small capital and under adverse circumstances, build for themselves a 
business and a reputation' as men of sterling worth through the exercise 
of their talents and industry. Instead of waiting and wishing for oppor- 
tunities, they accepted conditions as they arose, overcame obstacles and 
won success, and their examples are worthy of emulation by the young 
men of the present and future generations. Rufus L. Rochell, one of 
the leading grocers of Troy, Obion county, is a native son of Tennessee, 
having been bom in Weakley county in 1853, and is the fifth of six 
children bom to James H. and Nancy (King) Rochell, both members 
of old Tennessee families. James H. Rochell was a farmer in Weakley 
county prior to the Civil war. When that great conflict began he cast 
his lot with the South and served for the greater part of the contest as 
a soldier in the Confederate army. The exposure and hardship incident 
to military life so undermined his health that he died soon after leaving 
the army, and the subject of this sketch was called upon to contribute to 
the support of the widowed mother and the other members of the family. 
He managed to secure the rudiments of a good English education, but 
the greatest assets of his life have been a strong physical constitution 
and a determined will, both of which have been of incalculable benefit 
to him in the great battle of life. 

Mr. Rochell first started in business for himself in Jackson, Ten- 
nessee, but in 1890 he removed to Troy, where he took charge of his 
brother's business and purchased same the following year. Here he 
has built up a large patronage and established a reputation as one of 
the leading grocers of the busy little city and is now the oldest one in 
the town. His stock consists of a full line of staple and fancy groceries 
— the best and freshest that the market affords — and the people of Troy 
have a belief that if an article cannot be found at Rochell's, they will 
probably have to go to some other city to procure it. February 9, 1910, 



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1250 TENNESSEE AND TBNNESSEANS 

Mr. Rocheirs place of business was completely destroyed by fire, caus- 
ing him a loss of about $6,000. He laughed at his disaster, however, 
and within a short time reestablished himself in his present quarters, 
where he has a room 24 by 70 feet well stocked with everything the good 
housewife is likely to need in her domestic economy. Good goods, full 
weight and correct business methods have ever been the principles that 
Mr. Rochell has applied to the management of his store, and the result 
is **once a customer, always a customer.'' 

Mr. Rochell is a member of the Masonic fraternity and also of the 
Methodist church. In his church and lodge, as well as in business and 
social life, he is a man whom it is well to know and one whose word can 
always be relied on in every particular. Mr. Boehell is unmarried. 

James P. Finlay, son of James Finlay and Elizabeth Jane Finlay. 
Bom at Greenville, S. C, September 4, 1882. Awarded B. A. degree 
at the University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn., in 1906, and LL. D. 
at the University of Vir^nia, Charlottesville, Va., in 1908. Now en- 
gaged in the practice of law at Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Joseph Winpield Scott. Since 1897 a member of the Harriman 
bar, Mr. Scott is regarded as one of the ablest lawyers of Roane county, 
and is a special authority on the branch of real estate and land-titles law. 
He is senior member of the firm of Scott, Chandler & Anderson, the sev- 
eral members of which represent special ability and success in all 
branches of the law. 

J. W. Scott was bom in Morgan county, Tennessee, and his family 
have been well known and prominent in the state for upwards of a 
century. His parents were John L. and Perlesia (Holloway) Scott, 
both of whom were natives of Morgan county, the former bom in 1832 
and died in 1907, and the mother born in 1834 and now living, in her 
seventy-ninth year. One of the first settlers in Morgan county, Tennes- 
see, in 1821, was the great-grandfather, Samuel Scott, who came to this 
state from Kentucky. He had formerly lived in Virginia and in North 
Carolina, had served in the Revolutionary war and was in the battle 
of Kings Mountain. He was a colonel in the War of 1812, his common 
title in his community in later years being ** colonel.** Grandfather 
Russell Scott was born in Kentucky, and was very young when the 
family moved to Morgan county, Tennessee. He was a substantial 
farmer in Morgan county during the remainder of his life. Russell 
Scott was a brother of Julian F. Scott, a very prominent politician in 
Morgan county, and who is said to have furnished the character for 
the Colonel Sellers, made famous in Mark Twain's book under the title 
**The Gilded Age.'* Grandfather Joseph Holloway was a soldier in the 
War of 1812. 

The late John L. Scott, the father, was a farmer by occupation, and 
spent many years of his career in the public service. He was clerk of 
the county court, and also county register, holding office altogether for 
twenty years. As a Democrat in politics, and a man who was accounted 

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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1251 

a good liver, he was very popular and genial among all his friends and 
associates. He was a member of the Baptist church in which he took 
much interest, and his wife has been a Presbyterian all her life. Of 
their nine children, six are still living. 

J. W. Scott had to work for his support and advancement, and was 
identified with different occupations before he took up his profession. 
His early education was obtained in the common schools of Morgan 
county, and. later he read law under able preceptors, being admitted to 
the bar in 1897. He at once located in Harriman, and has since built 
up a large general practice. 

In 1878 Mr. Scott married Miss Dillie Long, of North Carolina, 
and they were the parents of one child, Lawrence, who is now in the 
insurance business in Harriman. Mrs. Scott died in 1881, and her 
husband afterwards married Sarah J. Smith, of Post Oak Springs. The 
children of their marriage are : Clay, who is manager of the picture 
show in Harriman ; Mabel, the wife of Thomas N. Smith, of Maysville, 
Kentucky ; and Lloyd, at home. Mr. and Mrs. Scott are members of the 
Christian church, and fraternally Mr. Scott is a Chapter Mason, and 
has served as master of the Masonic lodge two terms, and is a member 
of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. He is a Democrat, 
and for two terms was clerk of the circuit court in Morgan county. In 
1897-99 he was mayor of Harriman. 

Walter H. Anderson, the junior member of the well known law 
firm at Harriman of Scott, Chandler & Anderson, has been in practice 
at Harriman since 1910, and has already attained recognition as one of 
the rising young attorneys of the east Tennessee bar. Mr. Anderson 
educated himself, and while growing up contributed to the support of 
other members of the family, so that he is in every sense of the word 
a self-made man. 

Walter H. Anderson was born in Wayne county, Kentucky, May 
29, 1886, a son of Luke and Jane (Young) Anderson. The paternal 
grandfather was Jacob Anderson, a native of Whitley county, Ken- 
tucky, a farmer by occupation, and during the war was a member of 
the home guards. The maternal grandfather was James Young^ bom 
in Wayne county, Kentucky, and for many years a school teacher and 
farmer. Luke Anderson was born in Whitley county, Kentucky, June 
8, 1853, and his wife was bom in the same county in 1854. Both are 
still living, and during the earlier years the father followed the voca- 
tion of farming. Latterly he has been in the coal mining industry. 
They are both members of the Baptist church, and he is a Republican 
in politics^ and a member of the Junior Order of United American 
Mechanics. The six children in the family are mentioned as follows: 
John Marion, of Kentucky, Mary D., wife of J. L. Wilson of Chat- 
tanooga ; Walter H. ; Benjamin H., of Scott county, Tennessee ; Edna, 
wife of Clarence Ramsey of Kentucky; and Eva, unmarried and living 
at home. 

Walter H. Anderson attended the public schools of Scott county, 



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1252 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Tennessee, afterwards had a course in the Williamsburg Institute in 
Kentucky, and in 1902, took a business course in the Knoxville Busi- 
ness College. For several years he was employed in clerical and other 
lines of work and in that way obtained the means to put him through 
law school. In 1908 he graduated in law from the Cumberland Uni- 
versity at Lebanon, and started to practice in Scott county, Tennessee. 
In 1910 he moved to Harriman, and there joined forces with Mr. J. W. 
Scott, one of the best known lawyers of east Tennessee. 

On November 11, 1905, Mr. Anderson married Miss Emma Bowling, 
a daughter of William Bowling, who was born in Virginia, and came 
to Tennessee in 1866. He had previously served as a soldier in the Con- 
federate army, and was twice captured, being confined in the Federal 
prison in Ohio for a time, and for a time in New Jersey. The children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Anderson are: Stephen Arnold Douglas, aged 
seven; Gus Carr, aged four; and Walter H. Jr., bom in 1913. Mrs. 
Anderson is a member of the Methodist Church South. Fraternally 
Mr. Anderson is aflUiated with the Junior Order of United American 
Mechanics, the Eiiights of Pythias and the Masons, being past master 
of John Frizzell Lodge No. 592, A. F. & A. M., in Scott county. In 
politics he is Republican, but gives all his time to his legal profession, in 
which he is winning a worthy success. 

Willis F. Arnold. The present postmaster of the city of Jackson, 
the judicial center of Madison county, is not only giving an able admin- 
istration of the affairs of this oflSce, but has also achieved prominence 
and distinction as one of the representative younger members of the 
bar of this county, besides which he has been an influential figure in the 
councils of the Republican party in this section of the state. His char- 
acter and ability have admirably measured up to the requirements of 
the metewand of popular approbation, and his circle of friends is un- 
mistakably coincident with that of his acquaintances, the while he is 
recognized as one of the progressive and public-spirited citizens of Mad- 
ison county. 

Willis Fillmore Arnold is a scion of one of the old and honored fam- 
ilies of Tennessee and was bom in Henderson county, this state, on the 
10th of December, 1882. He is a son of Dr. John Martin Arnold and 
Laura Frances (Dodds) Arnold, both of whom were likewise bom in 
Tennessee, their present home being in the city of Jackson. Dr. Arnold 
was graduated in the medical department of Vanderbilt University, as 
a member of the class of 1877, and was for thirty years engaged in the 
successful practice of his profession in Henderson county, whence he 
removed to Jackson in 1907. He is a man of high intellectual and pro- 
fessional attainments and has long been recognized as one of the repre- 
sentative physicians and surgeons of Tennessee. He is a stalwart Re- 
publican in his political proclivities and his wife holds membership in 
the Baptist church. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1253 

' The present postmaster of Jackson gained his early educational dis- 
cipline in his native county, and after attending the Georgia Robertson 
Christian College, at Henderson, he finally decided to prepare himself 
for the legal profession. With this end in view he was matriculated in 
what is now Union University, at Jackson, in the law department of 
which institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1902 and 
from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws, with incidental 
admission to the bar of his native state. In 1904 he engaged in the active 
practice of his profession in Jackson, where he soon gained secure van- 
tage ground as an able advocate and well fortified counselor. He built 
up a substantial practice and continued to give his attention to the same 
until he was appointed postmaster of Jackson, on the 16th of April, 
1911. From 1905 until 1911 he also served as deputy clerk of the 
United States district court. 

Mr. Arnold has taken a specially deep interest in political affairs in 
his native state and has been prominently identified with the manceuver- 
ing of political forces In his home county. That he is here a leader in the 
ranks of the Republican party needs no further voucher than the state- 
ment that he has served consecutively as chairman of the Republican 
committee of Madison county since 1906, and that his ability in directing 
the affairs of the local party contingent has been proved in a most ef- 
fective way, the while he has created the minimum of antagonism and 
has gained the confidence and good will of the representative members 
of the opposing party as well as of those of his own party. His term as 
chairman of the committee will expire in 1914. He is affiliated with the 
Modern Woodmen of America and the Tribe of Ben Hur, as well as 
other representative civic organizations in his home city, and both he 
and his wife hold membership in the Baptist church. It has consistently 
been said that Mr. Arnold is ''a man of large views and conservative 
and dependable judgment." 

On the 24th of April, 1904, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Ar- 
nold to Miss Johnnie Johnston, daughter of John N. Johnston, a promi- 
nent citizen of Jackson, and she is a popular factor in the social activi- 
ties of her home city. They have one son, Willis E. 

Robert Lee Bynum. Another prominent educator of the state of 
Tennessee is Superintendent Robert Lee Bynum, now of Jackson. He 
has given generous service to the public schools of the state, both in the 
capacity of a teacher and as a superintendent. Both in county and city 
educational offices, he has done high credit to himself and to the colle- 
giate institutions of which he is an alumnus. 

Robert Lee Bynum is a native of this state, but a son of Kentucky 
parents. His father, William J. Bynum, and his mother, Theresa Gil- 
bert Bynum, were living in Union City, Tennessee, where the former was 
a merchant and agriculturist, when the son was born whom they named 

Vol. V— 4 



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1254 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Robert Lee. The date of his birth was September 28, 1867. William' J. 
Bynum died in 1874, but the mother of our subject is still living, in 
Jackson. 

In the rural schools of the vicinity of Union City, Robert L. Bynum 
received his elementary education. He later became a student in the 
Vanderbilt Training School at Union City and subsequently entered 
Bethel College at McKenzie, from which he was graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Philosophy. 

The young Ph. B. gained his first teaching experience at Ashland, 
Mississippi. Returning thereafter to Tennessee, he held positions in 
schools in Obion county, gathering such experience and developing such 
ability that in 1897 he was elected superintendent of public instruction 
in Obion county. To this position he was successively re-elected, serv- 
ing in his office until October of 1901, at which time he entered upon 
the duties of the principalship which he had accepted from the Jackson 
Board of Education, serving two years as principal of the intermediate 
department and two years as principal of the *high school. At the 
end of that period his fitness for county superintendency again led to 
his election to such office. He therefore took charge of the school system 
of Madison county and devoted his time and thought to supervising the 
schools and examining and directing the teachers of this county until 
tendered the superintendency of the Jackson schools. This latest posi- 
tion came to him on June 14, 1912, and he entered upon its duties August 
1, 1912. The many interested and appreciative patrons of the Jackson 
public schools view with confidence the future of the city's most impor- 
tant enterprise — the education of her youth. 

Superintendent Bynum is very well known throughout the state of 
Tennessee in all educational movements. From 1907 to 1909 he served 
as president of the Tennessee Public School Officers' Association. He 
is president of the Tennessee State Teachers' Association. In both the 
Tennessee State Board of j^ducation and the National Educational Asso- 
ciation he is an energetic member, as well as a prominent co-worker with 
his brother officials in the department of superintendents. 

Mr. Bynum is a logical thinker along political lines. And while his 
political alignment is consistent with the famous name his parents be- 
stowed upon him, his civic theories are nevertheless based upon carefully 
reasoned premises. His religious convictions are of the modem practical 
type that conceives morality as the highest raison d'etre of religion; he 
respects, therefore, all sects that aim for a high ethical standard and has 
a vigorous sympathy for each. His church membership is with the 
Jackson First Presbyterian church, U. S. A., of which Mrs. Bynum 
is also a member. 

In her girlhood Mrs. Bynum was Miss Fanny Allen, her native home 
being Mississippi. The AUen-Bynum marriage took place in 1894. In 
the subsequent years three children have completed the family, and have 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1255 

been named as follows : William Jennings, Gattye Louise and Eobert L. 
Bynum, Jr. The Bynum family has been counted a most desirable acqui- 
sition to the life of Jackson. Superintendent Bynum is noted as a man of 
genuine cordiality as well as of great executive ability. He is a member 
of the Masonic order, in Jackson lodge No. 332. 

Robert Gates. Colonel Gates — by which name the subject of this 
review is affectionately known through all Tennessee and in many other 
Southern states — has lived a life that is not only eventful but full of 
valuable achievement for his state. Distinguished as a Confederate vet- 
eran, effective as an editor of prominence and influence, notably success- 
ful as a promoter of many movements for the economic and industrial 
upbuilding of Tennessee, his sum of human effort has been remarkable 
in kind and in result. 

Though a native of Tennessee, the genealogical origin of Robert 
Gates is Virginian. His father, Benjamin Franklin Gates, was bom in 
Chesterfield county of the Old Dominion state, but came at the age of 
twelve — with other members of his father's family — to Henry county, 
Tennessee. There he grew up, adopted the occupation of farming, mar- 
ried and reared his family; in Hay ward county of this same state he 
died, at the home of his daughter, in 1898, having reached his eighty- 
third year. His wife was Elizabeth Jackson Roper, also a Virginian, and 
bom near Lynchburg, Virginia ; her mother was a member of the noted 
Lewis family, which produced such men as Gen. Andrew Lewis and 
Col. Charles Lewis, of Revolutionary fame. Elizabeth Jackson Roper 
Gates passed from mortal life when her son, our subject, was sixteen 
years of age. His birth had occurred at the Henry county home of the 
above-named parents on May 5, 1840. 

In the rural schools of his native vicinity, Robert Gates gleaned his 
preliminary education. He later pursued courses in West Tennessee 
College, which subsequently became Southwestern Baptist University 
and is now called Union University. 

Having scarcely attained his majority at the outbreak of the Civil 
war, the young man nevertheless eagerly answered the call to arms on 
behalf of the South, and throughout his military experience he con- 
stantly maintained an attitude of courageous loyalty and of martial 
initiative. He enlisted as a private, his regiment being the Sixth Ten- 
nessee Infantry; when the Southern congress passed a law promoting 
members of this division to the rank of officers, he was made a lieuten- 
ant in the regular Confederate army. In this capacity he served in the 
Light Artillery, first with Smith's battery and ^bsequently with El- 
dridge's. With the latter, Lieutenant Gates continued until the battle 
of Murphysboro. After serving a period on the staff of Col. A. W. 
Campbell on special duty he then came west with General Forrest, 
carrying advance orders that the independent forces organized in west- 



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1256 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

em Tennessee assemble at Jackson. There the general organized his 
army, which he commanded until the close of the war. After the organ- 
ization at Jackson General Forrest conducted his famous march through 
the Federal lines with five thousand unarmed men. As he took his men 
to northern Mississippi, which was the scene of his exploits for the 
remainder of the war, that locality was the scene of Mr. Gates's service 
thereafter during the conflict, being in command of a detachment of 
scouts. After the battle of Jack's Creek, Col. D. M. Williams submitted 
recommendations that for conspicuous gallantry on the field. Lieutenant 
Gates receive promotion to higher rank. This was so near the close of the 
war, however, that the promised promotion had not time to materialize. 
His war record was none the less an honorable and honored one, for his 
specific acts of bravery have been wisll known and frequently mentioned. 
One of these was undertaken on the need of General Forrest for more 
pistols than his army required ; Lieutenant Gates made his way to Ok- 
olona, Mississippi, and escorted six hundred pistols back to the army. He 
remained with General Forrest until the surrender, being one of those 
who shared that melancholy experience with their leader on the field. 
Since those years Robert Gates has, by the general consent of all who 
know him, been everywhere spoken of as Colonel Gates; and the title, 
thus informally bestowed, has never been given to one who better deserved 
its complimentary significance. 

The war being over, the first enterprise to which General Gates turned 
his attention was the very important work of a railroad contractor. 
The many railroads that had been destroyed during the war were re- 
built as rapidly as possible and Colonel Gates did much toward supply- 
ing the demand for ties, wood and cross timbers. This work he con- 
tinued for about three years and, as the need of it lessened, he entered 
other lines of activity. 

Being a n^an of decided convictions on many public matters of im- 
portance during the reconstruction period. Colonel Gates found the 
press a congenial outlet for his endeavors. He had, furthermore, a per- 
sonal interest in The Whig — one of the oldest newspapers in the South, 
and long edited by his uncle, W. W. Gates; the latter was during his 
activity the best-known newspaper man in the South and his political 
career was a noted one. The Colonel remained with The Whig for some 
time, passing from its offices to a newspaper establishment of his own; 
for, in conjunction with the Honorable B. A. Enslow, he founded the 
Jackson Sun, a combination of The Whig and The Tribune. For ten 
years Colonel Gates continued to be a proprietor and editor of the Sun, 
Those ten years were the most strenuous in the history of southern poli- 
tics and Colonel Gates' influence in this capacity proved to be decidedly 
salutary. He was one of those who finally brought about the Fifty and 
Three Compromise, of Gov. W. B. Bates' administration. 

Another important phase of progress present required Colonel Gates' 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1257 

assistance. In order to engage in it he resigned service with the news- 
paper above mentioned. This new work was that of right-of-way and 
subscription agent for the Ohio Valley Railway Company, in Tennessee 
and Kentucky. He later became right-of-way and subscription agent 
for the Tennessee Midland. This road — ^which has since become part 
of the Louisville & Nashville system — was given remarkable impetus 
through the colonel's efforts. He made many railway speeches and se- 
cured a large subscription list for his company. 

The business ability of Colonel Gates made him a very desirable 
secretary and manager for the Commercial Club at Memphis. This 
office he accepted and held for about five years. During that time he 
had an exceedingly active existence, successfully locating in the city 
of Memphis many important new enterprises. He was eventually in- 
duced to take up a broader field of promotive work, and in order to do so, 
he resigned his office with the Memphis commercial organization. 

It was at this time that movements were on foot for the Tennessee 
Centennial. Colonel Gates was made one of the officials of the first or- 
ganization and was in charge of the preliminary field work. When the 
exposition opened, he was again prominent as the head of the Shelby 
county and Memphis building. 

At the close of the Centennial, a new responsibility came to the colo- 
nel, who had now established an unusual reputation for success as a 
promoter of public enterprises. The Louisville & Nashville Railway 
sought his services as a special industrial and immigration agent. In 
this connection his wide acquaintance throughout the state led to his 
service in connection with the railroad legislation of Tennessee, during 
the legislative sessions. He has at times been special representative in 
Washington, while Congress was in session, for railroads of Tennessee. 
For sixteen years he has been thus occupied ; and although this period has 
been one of great upheavals, injuriously affecting many railroads, no 
adverse legislation has been passed in Tennessee against roads of the 
state. This immunity has been attributed largely to the efforts of Colo- 
nel Gates. 

In combination Avith these definite employments above named, the 
colonel has done much writing and public speaking along lines relating 
to industrial and agricultural movements in Tennessee. Numerous ar- 
ticles from his pen have been published by the Tennessee department of 
state and its department of agriculture ; many others have appeared in 
the newspapers of the state. When in the early 'eighties he was particu- 
larly interested in immigration to Tennessee, Colonel Gates delivered a 
number of addresses to that end, in various parts of Iowa and Illinois. 
He organized two excursions of prospective immigrants from the north- 
west; one train of these visitors went through western Tennessee and 
the other through middle Tennessee, the residents of both sections enter- 
taining them as guests. This was followed by a series of agricultural and 



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1258 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

industrial conventions, attended by persons from Illinois, Kentucky, 
Mississippi and Tennessee, and held in Jackson, Tennessee. All of these 
were conducted by Colonel Gates, who gave numerous addresses on im- 
proved methods of farming, on conditions of labor and on immigration. 
He has always been deeply interested in agriculture and during his pe- 
riod of editorship he had devoted much space and attention to diversified 
farming, as a result of which the present system of small fruit and truck 
farming in the central counties of West Tennessee was given the needed 
impetus. The good results of all this activity for the general good of the 
state and its people is constantly noted in many ways by the people of 
this region. He is, furthermore, one of the founders of the Farmers' In- 
stitute of Tennessee; these associations meet annually at Knoxville, 
Nashville and Jackson and during these annual meetings for fourteen 
years, Colonel Gates has been one of the program of speakers. 

Another interesting achievement of the colonel's eloquence is the 
Confederate monument that stands at Jackson, Tennessee. For some 
years a plan has been on foot for erecting such a tribute to the Southern 
soldiers. It was not easy, however, to raise the required funds, although 
the leaders in the movement were assisted by a ladies' auxiliary. For 
two years the enterprise lived, but lagged. Finally, on a Memorial Day, 
Colonel Gates, with the same powerful initiative he had shown through- 
out his career, addressed the crowds from the cemetery and raised $1,700. 
The work was at once set in motion, with Judge H. W. McCorry, the late 
Frank B. Hamilton and Colonel Gates as the committee with full powers 
for erecting the monument. 

It is unnecessary to say that Colonel Gates is decidedly a Democrat. 
His religious convictions are Episcopalian, as are those of all his family. 

The colonel's life as a man of family has extended throughout the 
busy years of his activity since 1867. In that year he was united in 
marriage to Miss Caledonia Jane Jester of Jackson, Tennessee, descend- 
ant of the Scotch families of Tait, Sutherland and Sinclair. His two chil- 
dren are a daughter, named Emma; and a son, named Robert M. The 
former is Mrs. C. A. Folk, of Nashville ; and the latter is well known as a 
newspaper man, at present the Washington correspondent for the Com- 
mercial Appeal of Memphis. Colonel Gates has four grandchildren in 
the Folk family and one in that of his son, R. M. Gates. May he live 
long to enjoy a ripe old age as one of the best loved men in Jackson, and 
one who is appreciated throughout the state as one of the makers of 
modern west central Tennessee. 

Mn.ES Scott, M. D. For a good score and a half of years Dr. Miles 
Scott has held an important place in this community of Robertson county 
as a medical practitioner of extensive and successful patronage. This 
county was the home of his mother's family, for his grandfather, Thomas 
Gunn, was an early settler here and was well known as a Baptist 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1259 ' 

preacher and one who was fortunate in the possession of a large tract 
of land, made the more valuable because of the numerous slaves who 
called him master. Thomas Gunn's granddaughter, Martha Gunn, was 
born in Robertson county in 1822 and here spent her entire life, which 
closed in 1905. The paternal line of our subject's ancestry was Vir- 
ginian. In the Old Dominion state in 1812 was bom H. S. Scott, who 
came with his parents to Tennessee when he was a child. Here he mar- 
ried Martha Gunn and became a leading physician in this part of the 
state, where he practiced for forty years. He was conspicuously a Demo- 
crat and the church relations of the family were of the Methodist de- 
nomination, Martha Gunn Scott being a faithful member of that church. 
They were the parents of eight children, of whom three are yet living. 
Seventh in order of birth in his generation of the family was Miles 
Scott, to whom this brief review is dedicated. His earthly existence 
began on April 7, 1854, in Robertson county, Tennessee. 

The Robertson county public schools gave Miles Scott his intellectual 
start in life. It was under the parental roof, however, that his am- 
bitions were best nourished. He looked to a career in the same profes- 
sion as that distinguished by his father, and a medical course was 
therefore his educational goal. He entered the College of Medicine of 
Vanderbilt University, in Nashville,. Tennessee, and in 1878 received his 
degree as a doctor of medicine. 

Dr. Scott began his medical practice at Barren Plains and has since 
conducted those activities in this locality. His professional endeavors 
cover a wide range of territory and has been one of genuine success in 
its healing offices. Dr. Scott has met with sincere appreciations for his 
ministrations and his financial returns have been of a gratifying status. 

An attractive and productive farm of three hundred and fifty acres 
provides the doctor's favorite diversion, for under his supervision ex- 
cellent crops of tobacco are raised. His chief interest is, of course, his 
professional practice. He is a member of the county and state medical 
societies. Of religious organizations, his personal connection is with 
the Methodist church, South, to which the other members of his family 
also belong. 

As a daughter of Anderson Holman, Mrs. Scott has formerly been 
well known, both as Miss Dora L. Holman and later as Mrs. Taylor. Ad- 
ditional data regarding her family will be found in the sketch of C. G. 
Holman elsewhere to be found in these pages. It was in July of 1890 
that Dora Holman Taylor became Mrs. Scott. She and the doctor are 
the parents of one child, a son named George Robert, who resides at 
the parental home. The doctor's family is valued as one of wholesome 
influence as well as of notable service to humanity. 

Edgar Green Parish. In the varied and tangible evidences of 
man's creative and constructive ability, none commands more universal 



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1260 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

respect than that class of work which evolves the many types of human 
habitation. Ordinary though the uses of buildings may be, through 
them a city or town takes on its visual character. Thus it is that no 
slight credit accrues to carpenter, architect or contractor, whose organ- 
izing ability makes possible those structures which combine usefulness, 
durability and harmony of outline. Edgar Green Parish might be one 
of those who, adapting the old saying, exclaim: '*Let me erect the build- 
ings of the city, and I care not who makes its laws." As a matter of 
fact, Mr. Parish is concerned with both the building and the law-making 
in Jackson, Tennessee. 

Mr. Parishes genealogy is Virginian, his birthplace in Milan, Gib- 
son county, Tennessee, the date of his nativity the 11th of July, 1868. 
His parents were Nehemiah Parish, an undertaker of that town, and 
Lucinda Poole Parish, his wife. The former lived until 1884, but the 
latter 's demise occurred in 1878, when Edgar Green Parish, the son, 
was ten years of age. 

Leaving Tennessee at the age of twelve and going to Clinton, Ken- 
tucky, for residence, Edgar G. Parish received his final education in 
Marvin College, of that place. After his five years of life in Kentucky, 
he returned to Tennessee, settling at Jackson, where for two years he en- 
gaged in the work of a carpenter. In 1887, he turned his knowledge of 
construction to account in taking up the contracting business for him- 
self. This line of activity Mr. Parish has ever since continued, his con- 
tracts becoming more and more numerous and important. He has su- 
pervised the erection of some of the most modem buildings in Jackson, 
and, in fact, in this entire section of the state. The structures for which 
he is responsible as contractor include, among others, the First National 
Bank, the new high school, the Elks' building, and the Southern Hotel. 
He is also notable for handsome and up-to-date private residences. 

Jackson has honored Mr. Parish with civic oflBce. In 1904 he was 
placed on the board of aldermen and has ever since continued to serve in 
that capacity. He had before that time for six years made one of the 
Madison county court. In both offices his judgment and his sanity of 
viewpoint have been such as to win respect and appreciation. 

Mr. Parish's large circle of friends includes many brothers of fra- 
ternal orders, in which the contractor has taken high honors. The Be- 
nevolent and Protective Order of Elks claims his membership in lodge 
No. 192; the Knights of Pythias in Lancelot lodge No. 13, in which he 
has held every office except that of chancellor commander; and the 
Order of Moose, in which he is also an important member. 

In 1891 Mr. Parish was married to Miss L. Moss, who died in 1899. 
His second marriage was solemnized in 1904, when Miss Edna Patton 
Wheeler, of Henderson, Tennessee, became Mrs. Parish. The two chil- 
dren of the family are both sons and are called Edgar Moss Parish and 
Robert Harvey Parish. The family are valued members of the Cum- 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1261 

berland Presbyterian church. In political aflUiation, Mr. Parish is a 
Democrat. 

Rev. Herbert Whiting Virgin. A name of distinction among Bap- 
tist clergymen, among leaders in social reforms and philanthropies, and 
among theologians of his denomination, is that of the Rev. Herbert 
Whiting Virgin, D. D., now of Jackson, Tennessee. His vigorous per- 
sonality and mind have stimulated religious and moral enthusiasm in 
many cities and in numerous states, for his guidance has been sought by 
churches and educational institutions in Kentucky, in Louisiana and in 
Missouri, as well as in Tennessee. Before noting the successive steps 
of his broad and unusually efficient service, we shall first briefly outline 
the main facts of his birth and education, although it must here be said 
that Dr. Virgin is one of those rare men who never cease to study — who 
look to eternity itself as the infinitely splendid post-graduate opportu- 
nity of the soul. 

Louisiana is the state of his birth. At MandeviUe, in that common- 
wealth, a summer home was maintained by Edwin Forrest Virgin, a 
wholesale seed merchant of New Orleans ; here he came from time to time, 
with his wife, Helen Caruthers Virgin, a lady of South Carolina parent- 
age ; and here, in 1872, occurred the birth of their son, who was christ- 
ened Herbert Whiting. 

The public school system of New Orleans was that which provided 
the early foundations of Herbert Whiting Virgin's education. From 
there he passed to Georgetown College. Thdt step completed, he sought 
the class-rooms of the greatest of Baptist institutions — the University of 
Chicago. There he pursued courses in theology and history — as well as 
at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary of Louisville, Kentucky. 
Thus equipped with the scholarly material fitting him for his chosen 
vocation, he was ready for his era of service, looking nevertheless to fur- 
ther study at later periods. 

In 1895 Reverend Virgin began his pastoral work, locating at Nichols- 
ville, Kentucky. With this ministerial responsibility he combined pro- 
fessorial duties in Jessamine Institute, where he taught graduate 
courses. This he continued for two and one-half years. When, at the 
end of that time, he was called to Lake Charles, Louisiana, to take charge 
of the First Baptist church of that place, he not only fulfilled the duties 
of his pastorate there, but organized three other Baptist churches in 
adjoining towns. This climate proved to be a difficult one for his young 
wife and child; he therefore removed, for their healths' sake, to La 
Grange, Kentucky. He became the pastor of the DeHaven Baptist 
Memorial church at La Grange, and at the same time pursued theological 
studies in the Baptist Theological Seminary located in Louisville, 
Kentucky. 



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1262 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

When four years had passed, Reverend Virgin left La Grange, Ken- 
tucky, to assume the spiritual leadership of the First Baptist church of 
Nevada, Missouri. After continuing there for nearly five years, he was 
called to the Benton Boulevard Baptist church of Kansas City. 

In the meantime the name of Herbert Whiting Virgin had become 
more and more widely significant of clear-sighted sincerity and of vital 
strength in the work of his denomination and related lines of spiritual 
advancement. These qualities, in addition to his rich theological erudi- 
tion, led to the conferring upon him, by two institutions, of the doctor's 
degree which he now holds by double right. In 1908, Georgetown Col- 
lege of Georgetown, Kentucky, awarded him the degree of Doctor of 
Divinity; and in the same year he was similarly honored as Doctor of 
Divinity by Union University of Jackson, Tennessee. 

While engaged in the city pastorate at Kansas City, Dr. Virgin's 
work had grown extraordinarily full of varied responsibilities. Its multi- 
plicity of service included his association with'the Word and Way Pub- 
lishing Company, of which he was secretary and to which he also gave 
editorial assistance in the capacity of book reviewer. At the same time 
he was president of the Sunday Observance League and vice-president of 
the Sunday School Board, for Missouri, being also a member of the exec- 
utive committee of the State Board and of the locating committee of the 
City Mission Board. During the years he had spent in ^lissouri, Rever- 
end Virgin had also organized the Young People's Assembly of that 
state, which has since- assumed large proportions. 

It was in 1908 that Dr. Virgin accepted the call to become pastor of 
the First Baptist church of Jackson, Tennessee. While thus oflBciating, 
he has also held for two years the chair of Sunday School Pedagogy of 
Union University. He has in the meantime inspired the interest that has 
led to the erection of the present $100,000 church edifice in which his 
people worship. 

Dr. Virgin's aid and advice are sought by many organizations whose 
purpose is religious and educational advancement. He is a member of 
the State Mission Board of Tennessee ; of the Education Commission of 
Tennessee ; and of the District Board of Education. His human interests 
are by no means confined within the limits of his church organization, 
but broadly touch all civic and other public causes. The political stand 
which Doctor Virgin takes is independent, although his economic convic- 
tions are of the Democratic cast. 

In the year 1897 Reverend Virgin was united in marriage to Miss 
Isabel Josephine Goff. Mrs. Virgin is a daughter of C. C. Goflf of New 
Orleana She and Doctor Virgin are the parents of four children. The 
daughters are named Ruth, Bessie, Mary Helen and Isabelle Josephine ; 
the young son bears his father's name — Herbert Whiting. 

To Doctor Virgin the church of the South owes no slight measure 
of appreciation for the vigor which he adds to church life ^nd to the 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1263 

principles for which all churches are striving. His is a name that stands 
for spiritual strength and progress. The fact that Doctor Virgin is as 
yet barely forty years of age is a cause for thankfulness to many whose 
hopes loom large for a nobler future for humanity. Realizing what such 
work as his can signify, it is good to anticipate his further aid, with that 
of his consecrated comrades, toward the gradual accomplishment of the 
soul's dream that the divine will may indeed one day be done in a mun- 
dane world as it is upon the celestial heights. 

RuFUs Parmer Long. Among the public spirited citizens of any 
community are often found prominent those who have been reared amid 
influences which tend to the higher development of the race in general — 
physical conditions such as the farm offers, with its pure air, water, sun- 
shine and plenty of healthful exercise, which permit free play to the 
best instincts of man. One of these substantial citizens is R. F. Long, a 
banker of Hendersonville, who has combined agricultural pursuits with 
a business career, and thus enjoys the broad freedom of the independent 
life in the country. 

John R. Long, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in 1830, 
in Robertson county, Tennessee, where he has engaged in farming all his 
life, which occupation he has pursued with much success. For a con- 
siderable period of time a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
he has been steward for years, and politically he is aflBliated with the 
Democratic party, favoring prohibition. His service in the Civil war 
extended over a period of seven months. The birth of Lucinda A. (Batts) 
Long, wife of John R. Long, occurred in Robertson county also, in 1835, 
she being a daughter of Jeremiah Batts, an early settler of the county 
and a prosperous farmer. 

Born April 4, 1869, in the county which is the birthplace of his 
father, after his, school days were spent and he had completed a busi- 
ness course at Nashville, R. F. Long began his career on the farm, to 
the management of which he has applied his business ability with unusual 
success, being the owner of 711 acres of land. Integrity, business acu- 
men, foresight and wisdom are recognized qualities in this man, and in 
1910 he was elected cashier and vice-president of the Bank of Hender- 
sonville, the capital stock of which is $5,000, surplus and undivided 
profits $2,000, with average deposits of $35,000. He is also a member 
of the board of directors of this bank, and has served as school director, 
is a Democrat in politics, a member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and belongs to the Elks, Nashville Lodge No. 72. 

]\Ir. Long was married in 1890 to Mary Woodard, daughter of Judge 
John Woodard, for years judge of the county court of Robertson county 
and also an eminently successful business man of Nashville. Four chil- 
dren have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Long : John W., a bookkeeper liv- 
ing in Nashville; Nellie, wife of 0. E. Davis, with Foster & Parks Com- 



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1264 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

pany, Nashville; Albert W. and Rufus H., fourteen and eleven years 
of age respectively. 

Walter S. Dotson, M. D. A specialist in eye, ear, nose and throat 
diseases. Dr. Dotson has had a very successful career both in general 
medicine and in his special work. A few years after taking his medical 
degree and beginning practice, his inclination and the trend of his abil- 
ities led him to specialize. His training is a product of some of the best 
clinics and hospitals in the country, and he is rapidly acquiring a posi- 
tion of exceptional distinction. 

Walter S. Dotson was born in Macon county, Tennessee, December 
13, 1878, a son of Hiram J. and Alice (Comwell) Dotson. James Dot- 
son, the grandfather, was a native of middle Tennessee and spent his 
life as a farmer. The maternal grandfather, T. J. Cornwell, a native of 
this state, had a prosperous career as farmer and merchant, and is now 
living in Macon county past eighty. He is a man of fine intelligence 
and education, and gave much attention to the sciences of astronomy and 
mathematics. Both Hiram J. Dotson and his wife were natives of Macon 
county, the former bom in 1850 and the latter in 1859. The father served 
during the last year of the war, though only fifteen, and was one of the 
youngest soldiers of the Union army. While on the road to Nashville a 
piece of artillery was overthrown and injured him. After the war he 
became a Macon county farmer, where he still owns a large estate, but is 
now living in Sumner county. He was the father of eight children, the 
doctor being the oldest, and educated them all for professional careers 
with the exception of the youngest, who is still a school boy. The father 
is a ipember of the Christian church, is affiliated with the Grand Army, 
and is Republican in politics though never taking an active part. 

Dr. Dotson is a graduate of the University of Tennessee and the Uni- 
versity of Nashville, having graduated in the medical department of the 
former in 1898 and taking his medical degree from the latter in 1901. 
He began practice at Kempville in Smith county in 1898, and continued 
there until 1906. He then prepared himself for his favorite lines of 
work, and studied and had clinical experience in New York, Philadelphia 
and Chicago, being in three of the leading hospitals of New York City, 
and in hospitals of the other cities. With this training for specializing 
he opened his office at Gallatin in 1908. 

Dr. Dotson married, in 1897, Miss Anna Dennis. Her father, the 
Rev. J. M. Dennis, whose home is at Franklin, Kentucky, is a minister of 
the Christian church, an evangelist whose work takes him to all parts 
of the United States. The Doctor and wife have two children, Mabel, 
now in school, and Walter S., Jr., four years old. 

He and his wife are members of the Christian church. He is a chap- 
ter Mason, is past master and now senior warden, and is grand lecturer 
for the order in the fourth congressional district. He also holds the 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1265 

oflfice of president in the order of the Lions, and is prelate in the Loyal 
Order of Moose. He is a past worthy patron in the Eastern Star. In 
politics a Republican, he is now serving as alderman in Gallatin. Dr. 
Dotson is a popular member of his profession, is secretary and treasurer 
of the Sumner County Medical Society, a member of the Upper Cumber- 
land and Middle Tennessee Medical Society, is medical councilor in the 
fourth congressional district for the State Medical Society, and a mem- 
ber of the American Medical Association. Since the above was compiled 
the doctor has been re-elected to each of the above oflSces. 

John R. Parker, M. D. For twenty years Dr. Parker has practiced 
his profession in Sumner county, has devoted his ability and skill to a 
large circle of patients. A native of the county, he represents a family 
which has been identified with this part of Tennessee since pioneer days, 
and its individual members have always borne names synonymous with 
solid worth and integrity. 

John R. Parker was born in Sumner county, December 29, 1871. 
Washington T. Parker, his grandfather, was also a native of the same 
county, which places the settlement of the family in this vicinity at a 
very early date. He attained to a successful position as a lawyer, finally 
moved out of the state into Texas, where he died. 

John R. Parker, Sr., father of the doctor, was born in Sumner county 
in 1831 and his death occurred in 1871. Educated in his native county, 
when he was a young man he accompanied his parents to Texas, where 
he remained only a few years, then returned to Tennessee, and during 
the war served in Company J of the Second Tennessee Infantry, Con- 
federate army. His military experience covered the four years of the 
war, carrying the musket of a private, and he fought at Shiloh, Chicka- 
mauga and other noted battles. After the war. his years were passed in 
the quiet pursuits of the farm. He married Susan Brown, a daughter 
of George T. and Amanda C. Brown, both natives of Albemarle county, 
Virginia, where they were married, and thence came into Tennessee on 
horseback, becoming early settlers of Sumner county, where they were 
well-to-do people. Susan (Brown) Parker was bom in Sumner county 
in 1839 and died in 1892. She was the mother of three children : Clare, 
who is unmarried and resides on the old home place; Washington T., 
also a farmer ; and Dr. John R. 

The common schools and the training of the home farm gave Doctor 
Parker his early preparation for a life of usefulness. He then entered 
the medical department of the University of Louisville, where he was 
graduated M. D. in 1893. The first twelve years of his practice were 
passed at Bethpage in Sumner county, and since 1905 he has had his 
office and residence in the county seat. He gives all his time to his pro- 
fession. He is a member of the Sumner County, the State, the Middle 
Tennessee Medical Societies, and the American Medical Association, and 



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1266 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

has been president of the county society. He is the owner of farm prop- 
erty in this vicinity. 

Lewis M.' Woodson, M. D. Since his graduation as an honor man 
from the University of Louisville Medical College in 1885, Doctor Wood- 
son has been practicing his profession at Gallatin. He is one of the ablest 
surgeons in this part of the state, and enjoys the prestige of successful 
achievement and the esteem of his associates in the medical fraternity. 
He is a son of the late Dr. Thomas M. Woodson, who in his time ranked 
second to none among the best physicians of Tennessee. 

Lewis M. Woodson was born in Sumner county, April 1, 1864. 
His grandfather, also named Lewis M., was a native of Cheatham county, 
this state, representing one of the early families, later moved to Sumner 
county, where most of his career was passed. He was a large farmer 
and slave owner, a minister in the Methodist church, and a man of much 
ability and influence. 

The late Dr. Thomas M. Woodson, who was born in Sumner county 
in 1830 and died in 1906, was a practicing physician in this county for 
fifty-two years and stood in the front rank of Tennessee physicians. He 
accumulated a large estate, was a chapter Mason and a Democrat in 
politics, and he and his wife took an active part in the Methodist church. 
He married Amelia Allen, who was born in Allen county, Kentucky, 
in 1835, and now resides in Gallatin. Her father, Luke P. Allen, was 
a native of Kentucky. Dr. Thomas Woodson and wife had seven chil- 
dren, four now living, as follows: E. A. Woodson, a Sumner county 
farmer; John C, a farmer and stockman also in this county; Dr. Lewis 
M.; and Tennessee, who lives with her mother. 

Lewis M. Woodson attended the Gallatin public schools and also had 
private tutoring. In 1883 he entered the University of Louisville Medical 
College, where he was graduated with honors in 1885. Since that date 
his oflSce has been regularly maintained in Gallatin, and with a large 
general practice he has combined a great deal of surgery, which is his 
specialty. Since 1887 he has been surgeon for the Louisville & Nash- 
ville Railroad. He has membership in the Sumner County and State 
Medical Societies, and the American Medical Association, and has been 
a very active worker in the county society. 

Dr. Woodson was married in 1890 to Miss Eva Brown, daughter of 
W. H. Brown, who for a number of years was one of Gallatin's mer- 
chants. They have two children : Catherine B., a graduate of Howard 
College at Gallatin; and Amelia A., aged five years. Mrs. Woodson is 
a member of the Presbyterian church, while the Doctor is a Methodist. 
He is affiliated with the lodge and chapter Masonry, with the Odd Pel- 
lows, Knights of Pythias, and the Loyal Order of Moose. He has been 
master of his Masonic lodge, is a past chancellor commander of the 
Knights of Pythias, and is trustee and physician for the order of Moose. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1267 

Xayier B. Haynie, M. D. For thirty years a physician in Gallatin 
and forty years in the state, Doctor Haynie has given such services to 
his fellow men as only a good doctor can, and his record in profession 
and citizenship deserves all the honor which his associates and friends 
have bestowed. In a sense he inherited his profession, for his father was 
a medical practitioner in Smith county for more than half a century. The 
Haynie family is one of the oldest in Tennessee, and its members have 
always been citizens of more than ordinary ability and position in their 
respective spheres. 

Xavier B. Haynie ^Yas born in Smith county, June 8, 1848. Taking 
up some of the history of his family, his great-grandfather, William 
Haynie, a native of North Carolina, was a soldier in the patriot army 
during the Revolution, and later crossed the mountains to the west and 
became one of the first settlers to locate in Smith county. His son, Elijah 
Haynie, the grandfather, was a soldier under Jackson at the battle of 
New Orleans, was a substantial farmer citizen of Smith county, where 
his death occurred. 

Dr. Henry B. Haynie, the father, was bom in Smith county in 1816 
and died in 1881, having spent nearly all his life in that county. He 
continued the military record of the family by serving first in the Semi* 
nole war, and later was a captain in the Twenty-third Tennessee Regi- 
ment of the Confederate army. He was wounded at Shiloh, and was af- 
terwards transferred to Morgan's noted cavalry as surgeon of the Ninth 
Tennessee Cavalry, and as such served until May, 1865. He was again 
wounded in one of Morgan's skirmishes in Ohio. In 1844 he had gradu- 
ated from the Louisville IVledical College, and with the exception of the 
period in the army was identified with the medical profession of Smith 
county all his career. He was in active work as a physician for fifty- 
five years, and his was the largest practice accorded to any one physician 
in the county. In politics he was a Democrat and just before his death 
had completed his second term as a member of the state legislature. He 
married Sarah Bradley, who was born in Smith county in 1822 and died 
in 1891. Her father, John Bradley, a native of Virginia, came in an 
early day to Smith county, where he spent the rest of his life. Mrs. 
Sarah Haynie was for sixty years an active member of the Methodist 
church, and her husband was a member for twenty years. Their five chil- 
dren are all living, and Dr. Xavier is the oldest. 

After leaving the common schools of Smith county, Dr. Haynie 
entered the University of Nashville as a student of medicine, and 
received his degree in 1873, being valedictorian of his class. The first 
ten years of his practice were in his native county, and in 1882 he located 
at Gallatin, where he has devoted himself unsparingly to the needs of 
his large clientage. He is a member of the Sumner County, the State 
and the Mississippi Valley Medical Societies. 

Doctor Haynie married, in 1874, Miss Belle Bradley, who died in 



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1268 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

1877. In 1883 he was united in marriage with Miss Fannie Allen, 
daughter of Van H. Allen, who was a native of Smith county and a 
prosperous farmer there for many years. Of the four children born 
to the Doctor and his present wife, two are living, namely: Lucy V., 
the wife of Lieutenant-Commander Stafford Doyle of the United States 
Navy; and Xavia, the wife of William R. Sturtevant, of Texas. Mrs. 
Haynie is a member of the Presbyterian church. The Doctor affiliates 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias 
and the Knights of Honor, and in politics is a Democrat. 

Albert C. Dobbins. One of the oldest officials of Sumner county, 
Tennessee, both in points of age and service, is Albert C. Dobbins, county 
registrar, who is a native of Robertson county and is a scion of a family 
that was established in this vicinity about a quarter of a century before 
Tennessee attained its statehood in 1796. He therefore represents one 
of the oldest connections of the state and is of the second generation 
native to its soil. The original progenitor of the family in this county 
was John Dobbins, the grandfather of our subject, who was a native of 
Ireland and came to America as a young man prior to the Revolution. 
Here he espoused the patriot cause and fought for American independ- 
ence. After his service in the Revolution he located in Sumner county, 
Tennessee, being one of this county's earliest settlers. Three of his sons, 
Alexander B., Carson and Robert, followed his example of patriotism 
and valor and served in the War of 1812. Alexander B. Dobbins, the 
father of Albert C, was bom in Sumner county, Tennessee, in 1781, and 
spent his whole life in this state, passing away in 1844. He was a farmer 
and tobacco planter and was quite successful in a business way. In the 
second war for independence he fought with General Jackson in the 
battle at New Orleans and also in the engagements in Alabama. He 
wedded Lovina C. Brigance, who was born in Sumner county in 1803, 
a daughter of James Brigance. Mr. Brigance, a native of North Caro- 
lina and a wood worker by trade, came into Tennessee when a young man 
and married in 1799. He located in Sumner county and there spent the 
remainder of his life. Alexander B. and Lovina C. (Brigance) Dobbins 
were the parents of eight children, of whom Albert C. is now the only 
survivor. Both parents were members of the Baptist church. 

Albert C. Dobbins was bom in Robertson county, Tennessee, October 
8, 1841. He grew up a farmer boy and attended the rural schools of his 
vicinity. With the martial spirit of his ancestors and with loyalty to the 
state of his birth he promptly entered the Confederate service at the open- 
ing of the Civil war and served from 1861 to 1865 as a member of Com- 
pany E, of the Thirtieth Tennessee Regiment of Infantry. He-fought at 
Fort Donelson, where he was captured and then was held prisoner in 
Northern camps seven months. On his release he returned to the Confed- 
erate army and fought at Jackson and Raymond, Mississippi ; and Chick- 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1269 

amauga, Tennessee ; and at Dalton and Atlanta, Georgia, as well as in a 
number of engagements of lesser note. At Atlanta he was again captured 
and was held nine months, being a prisoner at the time the war closed. On 
his return home he learned the carpenter trade and followed it for a 
number of years. He also taught school for about fifteen years. In 1898 
he was elected registrar of Sumner county and has been successively 
re-elected to that office to the present time, now having served nearly 
fifteen years. This is a very convincing testimony of his standing in 
Sumner county as an upright, reliable and honorable citizen. As an 
official he has been faithful, prompt and capable. 

Mr. Dpbbins has been twice married. In 1871 he married Miss Jinsie 
Love. She was a daughter of Solomon Love, who was bom in Sumner 
county and was a farmer and blacksmith. She died in 1875, leaving a 
daughter, Lena L., now the widow of Robert Maddox. On December 
25, 1897, Mr. Dobbins took as his second wife. Miss Susie Armstrong, 
daughter of Josiah Armstrong, who was born in Sumner county and was 
a wagon maker and wheelwright. Mr. and Mrs. Dobbins are members 
of the Christian church. He is a member of the Masonic order and has 
been secretary of his local lodge for a number of years. Politically his 
faith is founded upon the tenets of the Democratic party and he has 
long been an active participant in the local affairs of his party. 

James D. 6. Morton. One of the most influential Tennesseeans in 
Democratic politics is James D. 6. Morton, of Gallatin, chairman of the 
state Democratic committee. Mr. Morton has a keen and almost natural 
ability as a political organizer. During his fifteen years' residence in 
Sumner county he has been very active in public affairs. He is a prac- 
ticing lawyer at Gallatin, and for some years has been clerk and master 
of the chancery court. 

At Washington, Indiana, Mr. Morton was bom September 15, 1874, 
a son of J. H. and Josephine (Neal) Morton, mention of whose families 
appears in later paragraphs. Early in his career he learned the print- 
ing trade, and by that vocation supported himself through the period 
of his advanced education, which was obtained in Bethel College at Rus- 
sellville, Kentucky. 

Admitted to the bar in 1894, he began practice in Granada, Missis- 
sippi, where he remained until the spring of 1897, at which date he 
came to Tennessee, and a few months later located at Gallatin, where he 
has since been one of the enterprising members of the bar. In 1906 
came his appointment as clerk and master of the chancery court. 

Mr. Morton, in 1896 at Holly Springs, Mississippi, was secretary of 
the congressional committee, before age permitted him the privilege of 
voting. He was manager of Judge B. D. Bell's campaign against Judge 
Landon, Richardson and Henderson, for the supreme bench of Tennes- 
see, and secured the triumph of his candidate. In 1910 he was a member 

Vol. V— 5 



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1270 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

and secretary of the state Democratic committee, and was chosen chair- 
man of the committee for 1912. Mr. Morton has come into a position of 
influence through his own energies and ability, and has been a hard 
worker all his life. His church is the Presbyterian, and his affiliations 
are with the Knights of Pythias and the Sigma Nu College fraternity. 

The father of the state chairman of the Democratic committee is the 
Rev. J. H. Morton, a retired minister of the Presbyterian faith, and now 
a resident at Gallatin. He was born in Logan county, Kentucky, Novem- 
ber 17, 1833, a son of Joseph and Louisa (Davidson) Morton. His pa- 
ternal grandparents were William and Martha (Pryor) Morton, both 
natives of Virginia, and in an early day came over the mountains into 
Kentucky, where they spent the rest of their lives. Joseph Morton was , 
born in Virginia in 1790 and died in 1846. He was a soldier in the 
War of 1812 and sometime after that war came into Kentucky and set- 
tled on a farm in Logan county, where he spent the rest of his active 
career as a farmer. His wife, Louisa (Davidson) Morton, was born in 
Virginia in 1803 and died in 1898, coming to Kentucky when a young 
girl. Her parents were James H. and Harriet (Smith) Davidson, and 
the latter 's father, Jonathan Smith, was in the Revolutionary army, 
serving as a fif er. 

Of the ten children in the Morton family six are still living. J, H. 
Morton, the fifth of the children, attended the common schools of Logan 
county, Kentucky, where he was subsequently for eight years superin- 
tendent of the county schools. At the beginning of the war he was a 
student in Cumberland University, preparing himself for the ministry 
of the Presbyterian church. For eighteen months he was Also a pupil 
in the private school of Professor William Mariner. 

His first charge in the ministry was at Union Grove, Kentucky, and 
he was located at many places in that state, also for a time at Washing- 
ton, Indiana, was pastor of a church near Memphis two years, preached 
three years at Oakland, Mississippi, and for one year in Marshall county, 
Tennessee. His active ministry continued from 1864 to 1902, a period 
of nearly forty years, at the end of which he retired and has since resided 
chiefly in Gallatin, where he found employment for his energies in the 
deputy clerkship under his son. 

Fraternally he is a chapter Mason, and in politics is a Democrat. 
On May 1, 1865, he was married to Miss Mary Dean Gleaves, a daughter 
of William and Mary Gleaves, of Davidson county, Tennessee. She lived 
only about a year after their marriage. On May 15, 1867, was solem- . 
nized his second marriage, when Josephine Neal became his wife. Her 
parents were Rev. William and Sarah (Green) Neal, her father having 
been a minister of the Cumberland Presbyterian faith. The four chil- 
dren bom of this second union are: Minor, a resident of New York 
state ; J. D. G., of Gallatin ; Mary Dean, the wife of A. C. Bigger, of 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1271 

Dallas, Texas; and Fannie, who married H. P. Crume and resides in 
Hamilton, Ohio. 

Henry S. Collier. After more than a century of statehood and a 
much longer period of settlement the population of Tennessee is one that 
is largely native bom. The family of which this successful Gallatin law- 
yer is a member is one that has been identified with Tennessee nearly a 
century and has been well represented in the legal profession of this 
state, his father and grandfather both having devoted the active years of 
their lives to the practice of law. Henry S. Collier is a lawyer of ability 
and strength and has well upheld the prestige of the family name for 
professional attainment. 

Bom near Gallatin, Sumner county, Tennessee, September 4, 1877, 
he is a son of Henry C. Collier. The latter was a native of Dickson 
county and spent almost the whole of his professional career in his 
native county as a practitioner at Charlotte, the county seat of that 
county, having served during that time as a clerk of the court and for 
a number of years as a master in chancery. He was deceased in 1881 and 
was a member of the Presbyterian church. Miss Nannie Woodard, who 
became his wife, was bom in Sumner county, Tennessee, in 1859. Two 
children came to their union and of these only Henry S. Collier sur- 
vives. John C. Collier, the paternal grandfather of our subject, was a 
native of Dickson county, this state, and gave the whole of his active 
career to the practice of law at Charlotte. Felix G. Woodard, the ma- 
ternal grandfather, was bom in Davidson county but moved to Sumner 
county when a young man and there spent the remainder of his life as a 
successful farmer. 

Mr. Collier was reared in Sumner county and after obtaining a public 
school education he entered Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tennes- 
see, where he was graduated from the law course in 1898. He began the 
practice of his profession at Gallatin and continued alone until 1905, 
when he formed a partnership with J. T. Baakerville, which associa- 
tion has continued to the present. Mr. Collier has attained distinction as 
an able, hardworking and far-seeing practitioner, is admitted to prac- 
tice in all the courts of the state, and is recognized as one of the fore- 
most members of the Sumner county bar. The bar has long seemed a 
stepping stone to political preferment under our American system. In 
1912 Mr. Collier, who has always given unswerving allegiance to the 
principles of the Democratic party, was nominated and elected a Demo- 
cratic representative from Sumner county to the Tennessee state legis- 
lature. 

In religious faith and church membership he is a Presbyterian, and 
fraternally he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, in which connec- 
tion he has served as chancellor commander of Rowena Lodge No. 21 
at Gallatin. Mr. Collier has largely made his own way in life and is 



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1272 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

numbered among the forceful, progressive and worthy citizens of 
Gallatin. 

Harry Swaney. For ten years postmaster of Gallatin, Mr. Swaney 
was head of the Sumner county Republican organization for a number of 
years, and is one of the most popular men in the public life of this 
county. His career has been one of self -advancement, and by efficient 
service and ability to get things done has risen to a place among the 
men of mark in this section of the state. 

Harry Swaney was bom in the county of his present residence on the 
31st of March, 1872, a son of Bailey P. and Susan (Belote) Swaney. 
Both parents were natives of Sumner county, and the family has long 
been identified with this section of Tennessee. His mother passed away 
in 1872, while the father, who has long been a substantial farmer and 
was a soldier during the Civil war, now lives on his home farm in this 
county. There was only one child in the family of the parents. The 
mother was a member of the Methodist church. In politics the father 
was an independent Democrat. 

During his boyhood Mr. Swaney attended the rural academy where 
he was graduated and also had a special course of instruction under 
Capt. J. H. Bate. His practical career began on a farm, and he has 
always been more or less actively identified with farming. At the pres- 
ent time he owns a farm of three hundred acres in this county, and has 
improved it and made it an excellent evidence of his business prosperity. 
Some years ago he moved his residence into Gallatin, where he became 
connected with the federal service in the capacity of assistant postmaster, 
and from that position was appointed to the office of postmaster April 
1, 1902. His appointment has been reconfirmed under the successive 
administrations so that he has now served for more than eleven years. 
During that time many notable changes have been made in the service, 
and he will be particularly remembered in the history of the local 
post office as having been the incumbent during the development of the 
rural free delivery service and also at the installation of the new parcel 
post and city delivery. 

Mr. Swaney in early life became connected with the local organiza- 
tion of the Republican party, and for a number of years was chairman 
of the county committee. From this position of influence in the local 
organization he was promoted to the present office as postmaster. 

Mr. Swaney was married to Miss Alfa W. Angle, daughter of Wil- 
liam Angle, who was a farmer and mechanic, who spent many years in 
Sumner county, where he was known as a solid and substantial man of 
business and a public-spirited citizen. Mr. and Mrs. Swaney are the 
parents of three children : Ruf us, who is now in school, and Harry and 
Miller W. Mrs. Swaney is an active member of the Christian church. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1273 

Wm. F. Roberts, M. D. Perhaps the old adage, ** There is always 
room at the top/' applies with more force to the medical profession 
than to any other calling, though it is measurably true of all occupa- 
tions, and the more obstacles encountered in the climb the more room 
will be found when the top is reached. The man who is satisfied with 
mediocrity rarely ever rises above that state, while the man of true 
merit, inherent strength of character and laudable ambition pushes on 
toward a higher ideal. Years may elapse before his real worth and 
sterling qualifications become generally known, but when once seen 
are sure to be appreciated. 

The Roberts family, which is of English origin, is one of the old 
families of Tennessee. The great-grandparents of Doctor Roberts 
were natives of North Carolina and were among those who came from 
that state and settled in Tennessee at an early date. Their son, William 
D. Roberts, the grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was one of 
the prominent and influential citizens in his day, a large land and 
slave owner, and was for some years prior to the Civil war engaged in 
the tobacco and cotton business. When the trouble between the North 
and South came on, he remained loyal to the Union, and this attitude 
drew forth the hatred and enmity of his neighbors who sympathized 
with the Confederacy. Consequently he lost the greater part of his 
property and was reduced to rather straightened circumstances finan- 
cially, but he never sacrificed his p^'inciples and remained true to the 
government established by our forefathers. He married Martha Brown, 
a native of South Carolina, and they became the parents of eight chil- 
dren. Alonzo L. Roberts, the doctor's father, was a prosperous and 
successful farmer of Henry county, Tennessee, and was a man of strong 
intellectual ability. He married Miss Emma Wimberly, daughter of 
Lewis and Matheny (Western) Wimberly, and a member of a well 
known Tennessee family. To this union were born two children. 

Dr. W. P. Roberts, the elder son, was born, in Henry county, July 
11, 1869. He matriculated in the University of Tennessee, where he was 
graduated as a member of the class of 1894, and then took a post- 
graduate course in Chicago Polyclinic in 1901. The same year he 
located at Troy, Obion county, where he has since practiced his pro- 
fession and has won the reputation of being one of the leading 
physicians in that section of the state. Commencement day at his Alma 
Mater was really a commencement with him, for he has never ceased 
to be a student — ^both of books and men — and he has kept fully abreast 
of the new discoveries pertaining to his chosen field of effort. Being 
a firm believer in the effectiveness of organization and association with 
his brother practitioners, he is a member of the American and the 
Tennessee State Medical Associations, the Tri-State and the West Ten- 
nessee Medical Associations, and of the Obion County Medical Society. 
Through the interchange of ideas among the members of these organiza- 



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ND TESNESSEAXS 



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though he ran a good met 

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of Odd Fellow-B and the 

_ he has a prominent place 

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J^ has fnmishett Wilson wnnty* 

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_ 'vtion with the early tide of immi- 

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period of fifty one years, and his g randsi>n 

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1274 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

tions, he has gained many useful and practical hints concerning the 
treatment of diseases, and he has ever been willing to impart informa- 
tion gained through his own large and constantly growing practice. 
This course has marked him as a skillful and progressive physician — 
one who alike commands the respect and confidence of the members 
of the profession and the general public. Doctor Roberts is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity and of the Christian church, in which he 
holds the oflSce of elder. In both lodge and church work he takes a 
lively interest and is deservedly popular because of his genial disposi- 
tion, his open-handed charity and his general good fellowship. He 
believes in good government and the election of honest and capable 
men to oflSce, but has never taken an active part in political affairs, 
preferring to devote his time and talents to the work of his profession 
and in behalf of his patients. On November 25, 1897, Doctor Roberts 
married Miss Sallie J. Redditt, a native of Louisiana and daughter of 
LaFayette and Sallie J. (Dunagan) Redditt, both natives of Tennessee, 
farming people. The former served in the Confederate army. 

Oliver Duval Moore, clerk of the court in Sumner county, Tennes- 
see, was one of that county's successful business men prior to taking 
up his oflScial duties as clerk, and in both relations he has proved his 
capability and efficiency. He is a representative of some of the oldest 
and most prominent family connections of Sumner county and in his 
own career has followed their example for useful, honorable and worthy 
citizenship. 

He is a son of Dr. William P. Moore, who was born in Sumner county 
in 1829 and passed away in 1901 in the vicinity where he has spent over 
forty years in the sacrificing labor of a physician. Doctor Moore was 
reared in Sumner county, received his earlier schooling here, and for 
some time he followed the profession of teaching. His preparation for 
the medical profession was made in the Vanderbilt College of Medi- 
cine, Nashville, Tennessee, and the Louisville Medical College, Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. Locating at Portland, Tennessee, he there began the 
labors of a medical practitioner and continued them for over forty years, 
one of the best beloved and honored of his profession in Sumner county. 
He was not only an able physician and one of long experience, but he 
possessed the personal qualities of gentleness, sympathy and painstak- 
ing care. While he was very successful in his practice and accumulated 
a fair estate, no mercenary motive was allowed to influence his services. 
His aim was to do all that could be done for his patient, whether that 
patient lived in a palatial residence or in a cabin, and to satisfy the 
dictates of his own kind and unselfish heart. He also did noble service 
among the Southern soldiery during the Civil war. Doctor Moore was 
twice married. His first wife was Amanda Dickey and to this union were 
born : W. P. Moore, Jr., now a physician at Portland, Tennessee ; R. D. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1275 

Moore, cashier of the Portland Bank; and G. S. Moore, a resident of 
Springfield, Tennessee. His second wife was Mary Duval, a daughter 
of Dr. 0. H. P. Duval, a very able and skilled physician and cultured 
gentleman who was one of the early members of his profession in Sumner 
county. To this second union were born three children, two of whom 
are living : 0. D. Moore and H. M. Moore, twins, the former of whom is 
our subject and the latter of whom is a merchant at Portland, Tennes- 
see. The paternal grandfather of Mr. Moore was Richard D. Moore, a 
Virgiiiian by birth, who migrated to Sumner county, Tennessee, in an 
early day and taught school here for a number of years. He served as 
one of the early registrars of Sumner county. 

Oliver D. Moore, our subject, was bom November 20, 1867, and 
received his education in the rural schools of his native county of Sum- 
ner. He began business life as a merchant and followed the mercantile 
business twenty-two years, or until his election as county clerk in 1910. 
This was a contest that drew the attention of the whole state, as his 
opponent was H. Brown, who had served in that oflSce for twenty-four 
years. As a man of sterling principles and integrity Mr. Moore has very 
capably and acceptably performed the duties of his office and is num- 
bered among the popular officials of the county. 

On December 26, 1894, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Moore and 
Miss Jennie Moss, who was born in Sumner county and is a daughter of 
W. F. Moss, a well known and successful farmer of this county who 
passed away in February, 1912. He was a Confederate veteran of the 
Civil war and in that conflict served under Gen. John H. Morgan of 
Kentucky. Mr. and Mrs. Moore have three children : Charles D., Mary 
and W. F., aged respectively seventeen, twelve and four years. Charles 

D. and Mary are now attending school. Mr. Moore is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, South, and in political faith is aligned with 
the Democratic party. He was a prosperous business man when active 
along that line and owns a comfortable home in Gallatin. 

George W. Boddie. Notably successful as a lawyer and a former 
clerk and master of the chancery court of Sumner county, George W. 
Boddie has been a member of the Gallatin bar for a quarter century. 
His own career has been chiefly passed in Sumner county, of which he 
is a native, and his family is one that has been identified with the state 
for a century or more. 

He was born in Sumner county, January 14, 1852, a son of Charles 

E. and Evalina (Douglas) Boddie. His paternal grandparents were 
Elijah and Maria (Elliott) Boddie. The former, a native of Nash county, 
North Carolina, crossed the mountains into Tennessee early in the last 
century, and spent most of his life in Sumner county. He was a soldier 
of the War of 1812, and fought with General Jackson at New Orleans. 

Charles E. Boddie, the father, was born in Sumner county in 1818, 



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1276 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

and his death occurred in 1896. His active years were spent in farming, 
and his homestead was located six miles from Gallatin. His first wife, 
Evalina Douglas, was a daughter of James Douglas, who gives special 
distinction to this family history as having been the first male white 
child bom in Sumner county, where he spent all the rest of his life. 
Evalina Boddie died in 1856, the mother of seven children, of whom 
three are still living, including George W., who was the second in the 
family. Charles E. Boddie married for his second wife Susan A. Maney, 
and they had six children, of whom four are living. The father was a 
member of the Methodist church. South, was an Odd Fellow, and a 
Democrat in politics. 

George W. Boddie spent his early life on the farm, and was gradu- 
ated in law from the Cumberland University in 1875. In 1887 he located 
at Gallatin, and during the subsequent twenty-five years has enjoyed a 
liberal share in the legal business of the local courts and oflSce practice. 
From 1894 to 1906 he was clerk and master in the chancery court. 
Politically he is a Democrat. Mr. Boddie has been prominent in Odd- 
fellowship, having passed the chairs of his local lodge, and has served 
as delegate to the state Grand lodge. His church is the Methodist South. 

He was married February 25, 1875, to Miss Alice Davis of Wilson 
county, Tennessee. Six years later she passed away, in 1881. Of her 
three children one is living, Mina. In 1885 Mr. Boddie married Miss 
Willie Davis, daughter of W. C. Davis, a Wilson county farmer. Five 
children have blessed this union, and the four living are : James B., of 
Columbia ; and Rufus F., Sarah and Portia, all at home. 

Walter Sanders FAUiiKNER. A candidate at the primaries in 1912 
for the Democratic nomination for governor of Tennessee, Mr. Faulkner 
has become one of the state's public leaders. He possesses many of the 
qualities that are most valued in political life, and his popularity and 
capacity for services are not likely to become less. By profession he is 
a lawyer and has gained distinction in the bar of his home county, and 
has twice been honored with the district attorney generalship. He 
worthily upholds the prestige of a family which has been prominent in 
Tennessee for several generations. 

Walter Sanders Faulkner is a native of Lebanon, Wilson county, 
Tennessee, a son of J. J. and Nora (Sanders) Faulkner. The Faulkner 
family was originally from Scotland, coming to America in a very early 
day and locating in the colony of Virginia. Grandfather Asa Faulkner 
''spent the activities of his honorable career in Warren county, Tennes- 
see, where he was quite a wealthy manufacturer. He owned and operated 
several cotton and woolen factories before and after the Civil war. 
He was much interested in public affairs, and represented Warren county 
in the state senate several times. J. J. Faulkner, the father, was a busi- 
ness man, and had considerabe genius as an investor, his enterprises usu- 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1277 

ally being successful and extending to a wide field of commerce and 
industry. 

Nora (Sanders) Faulkner, the mother, is a daughter of Col. Richard 
C. Sanders, whose great-grandfather came from England and settled 
in North Carolina. James Sanders, this original ancestor, had a son 
also named James, who in his time came to Sumner county, Tennessee, 
locating near Castalian Springs, where he married Lettie Carey. They 
became the parents of Col. Richard C. Sanders. Col. Sanders at the 
beginning of the Civil war enlisted, was elected lieutenant-colonel of the 
Twenty-eighth Tennessee Regiment, and served with distinction for 
the full four years of the struggle. Following the war he represented 
Smith county in the legislature, and after taking up his residence in 
Wilson county repeatedly was sent from this county to the legislature. 
By profession he was a lawyer, and as such commanded a large practice 
over several of the counties of middle Tennessee. 

Walter Sanders Faulkner, whose ambition has been to make the best 
of his own talents and individual ability and at the same time to do 
credit to his honored forefathers, was reared in his native county, and 
was chiefly educated at the Cumberland University of Lebanon, attend- 
ing both the literary and the law schools in that institution. From 
almost the beginning of his practice he has enjoyed a liberal share 
of the legal business in the courts of this county, and at the same time 
his personal popularity soon led him into the field of practical politics. 
He served as Democratic elector in 1900, and in 1902 was elected 
district attorney general. In 1910 he was re-elected to this office. As 
already stated, in the campaign of 1912 he stood for the Democratic 
nomination for governor of Tennessee, and though he ran a good race 
in the field of candidates he was defeated. Mr. Faulkner is not mar- 
ried. He has his church membership in the Christian denomination, 
and is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Knights of Pythias. Besides his law practice he has a prominent place 
in business affairs, as president of the Union Bank & Trust Company 
of Lebanon. 

A. Oscar Eskew. The Eskew family has furnished Wilson county, 
Tennessee, prominent physicians for three generations. The first repre- 
sentative of the family in Tennessee was Dr. Andrew Eskew, a native 
of North Carolina, who came to this section with the early tide of immi- 
gration from the old North State and was one of the first physicians 
in Wilson county, where he thereafter continued to practice until his 
death. His son, Dr. John C. Eskew, one of the best known and esteemed 
men of Wilson county, has been a successful medical practitioner in this 
county for the remarkable period of fifty-one years, and his grandson 
is he whose name initiates this review and who in every respect is most 



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1278 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

worthily upholding the honor and professional prestige of the name he 
bears. 

Dr. John C. Eskew, above mentioned, was bom in Wilson county, 
Tennessee, in March, 1841, and during the more than half-century of his 
professional labors and his long life as a citizen of this community has 
so ordered his course as to command a secure place in the esteem of his 
fellowmen and to permit his name to go down in history supported by 
all the attributes of a well spent life and an honorable career. He has 
always enjoyed a large practice and is a member of both the Wilson 
county and the Tennessee state medical societies. At the opening of the 
Civil war he was appointed regimental surgeon for the Forty-fifth Ten- 
nessee Infantry and served in that position and with that command 
throughout that long struggle. He is staunch Democrat in political be- 
lief. He wedded Martha C. Rogers, who was bom in Wilson county, 
Tennessee, in 1846, a daughter of James Rogers, an early settler 
of Wilson county and during the remainder of his career one of its ex- 
tensive and successful farmers. Both Dr. and Mrs. Eskew, residents 
of Lebanon, are members of the Christian church. Five children came 
to their union and of this family Dr. A. 0. Eskew is third in birth and 
is one of three yet living. 

Dr. A. Oscar Eskew was reared in Lebanon and received his first 
collegiate training in Cumberland University, graduating from that 
institution with the class of 1893. He then entered the University of 
Tennessee, where his progress was most rapid, speedily developing those 
qualities of mental acquisition and retention so essential to a broad and 
comprehensive knowledge of the profession he had chosen. So well did 
he apply himself in this direction that he was graduated from the medi- 
cal department of that institution in 1897 as salutatorian of his class, as 
a reward for which high honors he was given charge of the Davidson 
county asylum for one year. At an early age he had developed those 
qualities of cool judgment, kindness of heart and strength of mind so 
essential to the success of a good physician and having now completed 
his professional training he entered upon the active practice of medicine 
in Lebanon in connection with his father. This association was contin- 
ued two years and since then our subject has practiced independently, 
rising steadily in professional prestige and becoming recognized as an 
able, conscientious and in every respect reliable practitioner, with a large 
and increasing clientMe. 

In 1904 Dr. Eskew was married to Miss Carrie Harris, daughter of 
Joseph Harris, a native and well known farmer citizen of Wilson county 
who is also a Confederate veteran of the Civil war. Mrs. Eskew died in 
1908. She was a most estimable lady and was a consistent member of the 
Presbyterian church. Dr. Eskew affiliates with the Christian denomi- 
nation. In politics he is a Democrat. He has served four years as as- 
sistant city health officer of Lebanon and keeps abreast with the advances 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1279 

of Ms profession as a member of the Wilson county and Tennessee state 
medical societies and the American Medical Association. 

Edwabd E. Beard. A prominent citizen and financier of Lebanon, 
Tennessee, and one of the leading and older members of the Wilson 
county bar, Edward E. Beard bears further distinction as a scion of two 
of Tennessee's worthy pioneer families. He has devoted over forty years 
to law with that success that has won him rank among the best legal 
talent of the state, and as president of the American National Bank of 
Lebanon and in other financial relations he is well known in the business 
circles of this section of Tennessee, where he is recognized as a shrewd 
and forceful business man. He has been a member of the Tennessee 
state legislature, and as a warm and earnest advocate of the church, of 
liberal education and of general public advancement he has rendered 
valuable services in these different directions. 

Edward E. Beard was born at Princeton, Kentucky, August 27, 1850, 
his parents being Rev. Richard and Cynthia E. (Castleman) Beard, both 
of whom were natives of Tennessee, the former born in Sumner county 
and the latter in Davidson county. The Beard family originated in this 
State with John Beard, the grandfather of Edward E., who was a North 
Carolinian by birth and migrated to Tennessee in an early day, settling 
in Sumner county, where he spent a number of years as a school teacher. 
He finally moved to Arkansas and passed away in that state. The Cas- 
tlemans were of Virginia stock, the founder of the family in Tennessee 
being Andrew Castleman, the father of Mrs. Beard, who came to Ten- 
nessee from the Old Dominion with General James Robertson, of pioneer 
fame in this state, and became a well-to-do farmer and the owner of 640 
acres of land near Nashville. He was one of the well-known men. of 
Tennessee in his day. Rev. Richard Beard, the father of our subject, 
received his earlier educational discipline in Tennessee and was a school- 
mate of J. C. Jones, the great Whig governor of this state. He was well 
educated and took up the profession of teaching, with which line of en- 
deavor he was thereafter prominently identified for over fifty years. 
After teaching in West Tennessee for a time he went to Princeton, Ken- 
tucky, to add collegiate training to his qualifications, and was graduated 
from Cumberland College there. Later he became president of that in- 
stitution, and from there he came to Lebanon, Tennessee, to become an 
instructor in the theological department of Cumberland University. He 
was also a minister of the Cumberland Presbyterian church for a num- 
ber of years and was one of the foremost leaders in the work of this 
denomination in Tennessee, his learning and ability, superior mind and 
unbending integrity making him an effective power in the direction of 
church work and of advancing and uplifting society. He was first a 
Whig and then later a Democrat in his political allegiance. Death closed 
his useful career in 1880. Rev. Richard and Cynthia E. (Castleman) 



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1280 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Beard reared six children, of which family Edward E. was the youngest 
in birth and is one of three yet living. Both in the arts and in law Ed- 
ward r(Bceived the excellent educational advantages of Cumberland Uni- 
versity and was graduated from the literary department of that insti- 
tution in 1870 and from the law department in 1871. He began the 
practice of law at Lebanon. Fitted by natural gifts and education for 
the profession of his choice, he soon displayed marked aptitude and 
ability in this direction, rose rapidly at the bar and early acquired a large 
and lucrative practice. Each succeeding year has but strengthened his 
legal reputation and he is admitted to practice before all the courts. He 
is no less able as a business man than as a lawyer, and as president of 
the American National Bank at Lebanon that institution has the services 
of a very wise and capable directive head. For twenty-five years he has 
also been treasurer and a trustee of Cumberland University. In political 
views he is a Democrat and in 1885 gave public service as the representa- 
tive of Wilson county in the state legislature, the duties of which hon- 
orable office he discharged with ability and with fidelity to his constitu- 
ents. Fraternally he is identified with the Knights of Pythias and is a 
past chancellor commander of his lodge. 

In 1876, in a house built by Andrew Jackson and near his old home. 
The Hermitage, Mr. Beard was joined in marriage to Miss Sarah Liv- 
ingston, a daughter of James Livingston, who was a prosperous merchant 
of Nashville. To this happy union were bom three daughters: Mary E., 
now Mrs. Thomas Pierce, of St. Louis, Missouri ; Emma, who became the 
wife of B. R. McKinnie, a wholesale merchant at Nashville, Tennessee; 
and Edna, who is now Mrs. Wever Harris, and also resides in Nashville. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Beard are active members of the Presbyterian 
ch,urch and Mr. Beard served as a member of the committee that in 1906 
eflfected the union of the Cumberland Presbyterian branch and the 
mother church. Mr. Beard's life has been a useful and worthy one. Not 
alone in his profession and business relations has he proved himself one 
of the world's useful workers, but his upright, intelligent, conservative 
and consistent course as a citizen, both in public and in private life, has 
made him worthy of recognition as one of the representative men of 
Tennessee. 

Claude V. Young, M. D. Well established in the successful practice 
of his profession in the old and beautiful little college city of Lebanon, 
Dr. Young takes rank among the leading physicians of this section of the 
state, and for his useful services in behalf of suffering mankind and as a 
native son of this commonwealth, he is well deserving of mention among 
the representative citizens of Tennessee. 

Born in Wilson county on June 16, 1867, he is the only son and is the 
eldest of four children of William H. and Bettie (Vivrette) Young, 
now residents of East Nashville, Tennessee, but formerly well known and 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1281 

highly respected farmer residents of Wilson county. Both parents are 
natives of Wilson county, where the father's birth occurred in 1842 and 
where the mother was born in 1847, and both have long been faithful 
members of the Baptist church. William H. Young followed the pur- 
suit of farming in Wilson county a number of years but subsequently re- 
moved to Nashville, where he engaged in the hardware business for a 
time. He is now residing in East Nashville, retired. He is a Confed- 
erate veteran of the Civil war and throughout that conflict fought as a 
member of Company I of the Seventh Tennessee Regiment. This regi- 
ment, one of marked bravery, saw long active and hard service in Vir- 
ginia and fought under '* Stonewall'' Jackson from the battle of Seven 
Pines in 1862 to the fall of that brave general. With the Seventh Ten- 
nessee Mr. Young participated in many of the hardest fought battles of 
the eastern campaign, as well as in many of less importance, among the 
severer engagements being that of Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chan- 
cellorsville, Gettysburg and the battles of the Wilderness campaign. At 
Fredericksburg he was severely wounded, suffering wounds also in two 
later battles, and shortly before the war closed he was captured. Re- 
turning to his home in Tennessee he began life anew and became a suc- 
cessful man in business. His father, William L. Young, had been a 
farmer of considerable competence up to the time of the war, but suffered 
heavy financial losses during that conflict. The latter was a native of 
London and had immigrated to this country shortly after attaining 
his majority, settling in Wilson county, Tennessee, where he continued 
a resident until his death. He was well known in this county, having 
served as chairman of the county court for over twenty years, and he 
lived to be nearly ninety years old. Mrs. Bettie (Vivrette) Young, the 
mother of Dr. Young, is a daughter of Buchanan Vivrette, who was bom 
in Tennessee and spent his life at Greenhill, Wilson county, as a success- 
ful farmer and trader. The sisters of Dr. Young are Ruby Lee, who 
now resides in Los Angeles, California, and whose husband, H. E. Her- 
rin, is a hardware merchant there and also has similar interests at Nash- 
ville, Tennessee; Floy Belle, now Mrs. Jesse W. Rives, of East Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, whose husband is a bookkeeper; and Nancy Elizabeth, 
who became the wife of Eugene Johns, a theatre manager at Nashville. 
Dr. Claude V. Young spent his boyhood in Wilson county and there 
was prepared for his entrance in the college at Santa Fe, Maury county. 
At the conclusion of his collegiate studies he matriculated at Vanderbilt 
University, Nashville, to prepare for the profession of medicine, and was 
graduated as a Doctor of Medicine in 1893. He began the practice of 
medicine iry the country in Wilson county, continuing thus until 1906, 
when he removed to Lebanon, where he has since steadily built up a rep- 
resentative and profitable practice and has become recognized as one of 
the most successful representatives of his profession in Wilson county. 
His professional interest is indicated further by his membership in the 



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1282 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Wilson County Medical Society, the Tennessee State Medical Society and 
the American Medical Association. Dr. Young has good business ability 
as well as medical skill and his financial accomplishments have paralleled 
his professional success. 

In 1898 he was joined in marriage to Elizabeth, daughter of Rev. 
James M. Donnell, a Presbyterian minister who has followed his honor- 
able calling many years and is yet living, a resident of Lebanon arid in 
advanced years. Rev. Robert Donnell, the grandfather of Mrs. Young, 
and a pioneer clergyman of the Presbyterian church in Tennessee, built 
the first church in Lebanon and was one of the leaders in the founding of 
the Cumberland Presbyterian branch of this denomination, his minis- 
terial labors also covering a long period of years. Mrs. Young is affiliated 
with this denomination, while Dr. Young sustains membership in the 
Baptist church. They have one son, William D. Young, now attending 
school at the Castle Heights Training School, Lebanon. In politics Dr. 
Young has identified himself with the Democratic party. 

Houston F. Stra.tton. It is most gratifying to note by means of the 
personal reviews appearing in this publication that a very representative 
percentage of the native sons of Tennessee who are accorded recognition 
have found in this commonwealth ample opportunities for the achieving 
of success along the various lines of business, professional, official and 
industrial endeavor, and that through their character and services they 
are honoring the fine old state which they may well be proud to desig- 
nate as their native heath. Such an one is Mr. Stratton, the' efficient and 
popular incumbent of the office of circuit court clerk of Wilson county, 
and one of the highly esteemed and progressive citizens of Lebanon, the 
judicial center of his native county. 

A scion of one of the sterling pioneer families of southeastern Ten- 
nessee, Houston P. Stratton was born at Lebanon, Wilson county, on the 
20th of December, 1866, and is a son of S. G. and Alice (Fisher) Strat- 
ton, of whose two children he is the elder; the younger son, Prank C, 
is the incumbent of an executive position in the Lebanon National Bank. 
S. O. Stratton was born in Wilson county, on the 30th of January, 1844, 
and here passed his entire life, his death having occurred in 1909. On 
the 9th of November, 1865, was solemnized his marriage to Miss Alice. 
Fisher, who likewise was born in Wilson county and who was a daughter 
of Houston and Ann C. Fisher, who also were nati^ves of this state and 
representatives of families that were here founded in the early terri- 
torial epoch, the subject of this review having been named in honor of 
his maternal grandfather. Mrs. Alice (Fisher) Stratton wa^ summoned 
to the life eternal in October, 1877, and in August, 1879, S. G. Stratton 
wedded Miss licila Owen, who survives him and still maintains her home 
in Lebanon. Three children were bom of this union, all daughters 
and married. The father of the subject of this sketch was long num- 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1283 

bered among the prominent business men and influential citizens of 
Wilson county and so ordered his life in all its relations as to retain the 
inviolable confidence and esteem of all who knew him. He was for 
many years identified with the banking business and was one of the 
organizers of the Bank of Lebanon, which was eventually merged into 
the present Lebanon National Bank. He was. one of the substantial 
capitalists of his native county, was the owner of valuable farming prop- 
erty and city realty, and was specially influential in public affairs of a 
local order. He was called upon to serve in nearly all of the various 
county offices and also represented his county in the state legislature. 
He was a zealous member of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, as 
were also his first and his second wives; was a prominent and appre- 
ciative member of the Masonic fraternity, and also was affiliated with 
the Lebanon lodge of Kjiights of Pythias. He gave unqualified alleg- 
iance to the Democratic party and was prominent in its local councils 
and activities. At the time of the Civil war he was in the Confederate 
service for a short period, and two of his brothers likewise gave valiant 
service as soldiers of the Confederacy, both having been wounded in 
action. S. G. Stratton was a son of Thomas JeflEerson Stratton and Car- 
oline (Golladay) Stratton, the former of whom was bom in Sumner 
county, this state, on the 5th of August, 1817. Thomas J. Stratton was 
one of the representative citizens of Wilson county, where he was a 
pioneer banker and merchant of Lebanon and the founder of one of the 
first banks in the county. He owned also a large landed estate and a 
number of slaves, was a stalwart in the camp of the Democratic party 
and continued as one of the leading men of Wilson county until his 
death. The brief data here incorporated show that the name of the Strat- 
ton family has been most conspicuously and worthily identified with the 
civic and material development and upbuilding of this county, and he 
who figures as the immediate subject of this sketch may well take pride 
in the ancestral record. 

Houston Fisher Stratton is indebted to the public schools of Leba- 
non for his early educational discipline and at the age of twenty-one 
years he began reading law under effective private preceptorship. He 
made substantial and rapid advancement in his absorption of legal lore 
and was admitted to the bar, at Lebanon, in 1888. He has since proved 
himself most resourceful and successful in the practical work of his 
profession and has presented causes in the various courts of the state, 
including the supreme court and those of Federal establishment. He 
has served as circuit court clerk for his native county since 1910, and he 
gives a most careful and acceptable administration of his official duties, 
besides controlling a substantial and representative law practice with 
prestige as one of the able and popular members of the bar of Wilson 
county. In both political and religious lines he has not deviated from 
the ancestral faith, as he is a staunch Democrat and a member of the 



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1284 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Methodist Episcopal church, South; his wife being a member of the 
Cumberland Presbyterian church. 

On the 11th of July, 1902, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Stratton to Miss Emma McCauley, daughter of the late Broderick Mc- 
Cauley, a representative agriculturist and honored citizen of Houston 
county, this state. Mr. and Mrs. Stratton have one child, Samuel 6., 
who was bom on the 22nd of September, 1904, and who is now attending 
the public schools of Lebanon. 

Robert Cox. Capable, energetic and progressive, Robert Cox, post- 
master at Lebanon, Tennessee, is a young man who stands high in the 
regard of his fellow men in his native county of Wilson and is a very 
worthy representative of its best citizenship. As a business man he is 
resourceful and accomplishing, and to his duties as an ofl&cial and citizen 
he gives of his highest order of endeavor. 

Bom at Greenvale, Wilson county, Tennessee, September 7, 1877, he 
grew to young manhood in the vicinity of his birth and during that time 
obtained a good education, his earlier discipline received in the public 
schools of Wilson county and at Watertown Academy being supple- 
mented by about two years of study in the University of Tennessee. 
When entering upon independent activity in the business world he did 
so as a farmer, but shortly afterward, or in 1898, he came to Lebanon to 
take up the duties of assistant postmaster, in which position he con- 
tinued to serve six years. He severed his connection with the postoffice 
in 1904 by resignation and engaged in the laundry business in Lebanon, 
continuing that business identification until 1910, and in the meantime 
serving as business manager of the Lebanon College a year and a half, 
or until it burned in 1909. In 1910 he was appointed postmaster at 
Lebanon and at that time took up the duties with which he was already 
familiar and which he has since performed in the most acceptable man- 
ner. He is a Republican in political sentiment and adherency. The 
parents of Robert Cox, who are James A. and Ann S. (Grimmet) Cox, 
well known and highly respected citizens of Wilson county now residing 
at Watertown, are both natives of this county, the former's birth having 
occurred at Statesville in 1843, and the birth of the latter having 
occurred at the village of fireenvale in 1841. The elder Mr. Cox fol- 
lowed merchandising successfully for a number of years, or until 1908, 
when he assumed the duties of postmaster and served in that oflfice until 
1912. He is now living retired. In his political belief he is a Repub- 
lican, but while he has always taken an active part in the local political 
affairs of his party he never ran for oflSce and his one request for oflScial 
position was granted him. He has served as a member of the county 
committee for fifty years. This branch of the Cox family originated in 
Tennessee with A. W. Cox, the father of James A., who was a native of 
North Carolina and came into this state early in the last century. A 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1285 

tailor by trade, he came here alone at the age of seventeen and settled 
in Statesville, Wilson county, in 1835. Mrs. Ann S. (Grimmet) Cox is 
a daughter of William H. Grimmet, who also was an early settler in Ten- 
nessee and became well known throughout this section of the state 
through his services as a Baptist minister. He was a native Virginian 
and came to Tennessee on horseback in '1830 as a young man. He was 
engaged in spreading and teaching his religious faith until his sudden 
death at Statesville, Tennessee. To James A. and Ann S. (Grimmet) 
Cox were born three children, two of whom are living : Mary, now Mrs. 
Thomas J. McAdoo, of Memphis, Tennessee, and Robert of this review 
In 1905 Mr. Cox was married to Miss May Belle Wilson, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Wilson, residents of Rome, Tennessee, and pros- 
perous farmer citizens of that community. William 3ell, the maternal 
grandfather of Mrs. Cox, gave true and manly service in defense of the 
Confederacy during the Civil war, but was captured early during that 
struggle and served as a prisoner of war at Staten Island three and a 
half years. Yet surviving at the remarkable age of ninety-nine years, he 
resides at Rome, Tennessee, and is well and prominently known through- 
out the state. He is a cousin of John Paul Jones, the naval hero of the 
Revolution. Mrs. Cox is a member of the Presbyterian church. Mr. 
Cox aflBliates fraternally with the Masonic order and the Knights of 
Pythias, and is a past chancellor commander of the latter order. 

L. B. Walton, M. D. The name of Dr. L. B. Walton connects both 
a distinguished family and a notable career in the medical profession, 
in which he has been prominent for considerably more than a half cen- 
tury. In both paternal and maternal lines has his ancestry been of dis- 
tinction. To a leading Virginia family belonged Martyn Walton, phy- 
sician and land owner, his grandfather ; and of a similar class came his 
paternal grandmother, who was a sister of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. 
They came from Louisa county, Virginia, to Robertson county, where 
their son T. J. Walton, was born. Through the latter the families of 
Walton and Bartlett were joined. Thomas Bartlett (the maternal 
grandfather of our subject), was a native of Louisiana and a very 
wealthy man, an extensive portion of whose estate was left to his daugh- 
ter. She, Martha Bartlett, was born in Robertson county, Tennessee, 
and here married T. J. Walton, referred to above. He it was who be- 
came, in his day, Robertson county's most noted physician, practicing 
here for sixty-four years. He was also a land owner of extensive prop- 
erty and a slave holder as well. Martha Bartlett Walton, his wife, was 
a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church and carefully 
reared the four children who were bom to her and Dr. T. J. Walton ; of 
these three are yet living. The first born child of his parents was L. B. 
Walton, whose name forms the caption of this biographical account. 

Born in Robertson county on December 27, 1827, T. J. Walton in 

Vol. V— 



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1286 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

his earlier years was given such educational advantages as were obtain- 
able in the common schools of the period. He fitted himself for entrance 
into the medical college at Louisville, Kentucky, from which institution 
he was graduated in 1848. He immediately entered upon his medical 
practice, locating at Crossplains, where he has ever since remained, 
gradually increasing his usefulness and his reputation through his more 
active years. His services have been in great demand, his professional 
errands of mercy have been many and arduous, and he has frequently 
ridden on horseback such distances as from Goodletsville to Adairsville. 
He has lived a life not only of usefulness, but also of thrift. The Civil 
war left him without property, the estate his wife had brought into the 
family having been swept away by the fortunes of war. But the doctor's 
tireless toil and his wise care have established a gratifying financial 
status. He is the owner of five hundred and fifty acres of land and has 
been prominently connected with the Crossplains bank, of which he was 
president for one year. 

Not the least of the good doctor's achievements, nor the least consid- 
erable phase of his good fortune is his family. On December 18, 1854, 
he was united in marriage to Miss Mildred H. French, the daughter of 
Thomas J. French, who was a native of Montgomery county, Tennessee, 
and a member of a rich and prominent family of that region. The doc- 
tor and his wife are the parents of four sons and two daughters. The 
eldest, christened Mattie, is Mrs. George Bradford, of Nashville; T. J. 
Walton, the elder son, is also a resident of that same capital city j Fan- 
nie Walton became Mrs. W. S. Simmons and lives in Springfield ; Mar- 
tin — ^the junior Dr. Walton — continues the family line of physicians and 
now relieves Dr. L. B. Walton of much of his practice. The mother of 
these sons and daughters passed to the invisible life in May of 1905, 
remembered for her noble qualities as a mother and a Christian. The 
family church connection is that of the Baptist denomination. The 
fraternal affiliation of Dr. L. B. Walton is Masonic ; he has been a mem- 
ber of the organization for sixty years and is also a chapter IMason. Few 
men of the estimable doctor's age can look back upon years of greater 
usefulness. 

John Calvin Gburin, M. D. There is perhaps no field of modem 
practical science in which more notable progress is being made than in 
that of medicine. The conservation of human resources, the symmetrical 
development and care of body, nerves and brain, the amazing possibilities 
life holds, not only for the strong, but for those heretofore defrauded of 
their birthright of health — these are receiving from the up-to-date physi- 
cian more constructive study than ever before. The present-day physi- 
cian is no mere drug-dispenser; he is also apostle of sane living. He 
takes pride not only in the cure, but in the prevention of disease ; he pre- 
scribes not only antidotes in bottle form, but also intelligent rules for 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1287 

his patient to follow ; he understands not only materia mediea, but also 
psychotherapy; he not only mends the battered human structure, but 
also builds up a higher, finer development. His mission is not only of 
today, but of tomorrow. It is said that, financially, the physicians of 
today are losing out, for the multitude who pay willingly for bottled 
nostrums, grudge payment for the wise advice which accompanies or 
takes its place. But the conscientious doctor toils on, looking to a day 
when medical practice may be institutionalized and each practitioner 
justly remunerated by a system as advanced and eflScient as that of his 
own science. 

One who may live to see that day is the talented young physician of 
Slayden, Tennessee, Dr. John Calvin Geurin. Tennessee is this young 
physician's native place, as it is also that of his parents. His father's 
family were formerly of North Carolina residence, Henry Geurin, his 
grandfather, having spent his latter days in Tennessee, where H. K. 
Geurin, the doctor's father, was born. Cumberland Furnace was the 
birthplace and March 29, 1851, the date of birth of H. K. Geurin, 
who married Miss Dona Martha Slayton, born in 1852, in the ninth dis- 
trict of Dickson county. They lived in that same locality, where they 
possessed a farm of 101 acres. H. K. Geurin was at one time connected 
with the* fraternal society The Wheelers, an organization which no 
longer exists. Politically he is a Democrat. Both he and his wife are 
still living. 

In the parental home, located as above noted, John Calvin Geurin 
and five other children were bom, three of whom are now living. The 
subject of this review was the first-bom, the date of his birth being De- 
cember 11, 1878. The second in line was Augusta, now Mrs. L. C. 
O'Hara, of Princeton, Kentucky; and the third, William Geurin, now a 
resident of Dogwood, Tennessee. Dr. Geurin 's early education was pur- 
sued in the south side public schools and his professional preparation was 
accomplished in the University of Nashville, where in the medical depart- 
ment he studied the prescribed courses, and having completed his period 
of research, received his license to practice medicine in the year 1906. 

Dr. Geurin gained his initial experiene in medical practice at Par- 
due, Tennessee, where he located immediately for practice. From there 
he removed to Ellis Mills, where he remained until 1908, the date of his 
coming to Slayden. Here he has ever since been in practice with a 
steadily growing patronage and with an increasing reputation for thor. 
ough reliability. 

The Montgomery County Medical Society and the State Medical So- 
ciety include Dr. Geurin as one of their most enthusiastic members. Of 
non-professional organizations, he is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, in Slayden lodge, No. 469, and of the Masonic Camp, 



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1288 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

lodge No. 445, Slayden. His political alignment is with the Democratic 
party. 

Harry E. Dowlen of Montgomery county, Tennessee, not content 
with the ordinary successes that greet any hard working farmer who 
does not have a run of hard luck, has followed the trend of the times 
toward specialization, and by devoting all of his energies toward raising 
certain products, has become one of the most prosperous farmers in 
Montgomery county. He is a native of the state of Tennessee and is 
descended from parents and grandparents who were citizens of this 
state, so his interest and activity in her behalf are necessarily strong. 

Harry E. Dowlen was born in Robertson county, Tennessee, on the 
13th of March, 1883. His parents were both born in Tennessee, his 
father having been born in 1852 and his mother in 1853. He is a son of 
Cicero Dowlen, whose wife was Sallie W. Thompson before her marriage. 
Cicero Dowlen is the son of John Dowlen, who was an early settler in 
the state of Tennessee. The maternal grandfather of Harry E. Dow- 
len, William R. Thompson, was a native of Virginia, and also settled in 
the state at an early date, becoming a successful farmer and tobacco 
merchant. Both of Mr. Dowlen 's grandparents were lairge slaveholders 
and the owners of fine plantations in Montgomery and Robertson coun- 
ties. Cicero Dowlen was reared and educated in Robertson county, and 
after completing his own education he became a school teacher and for a 
number of years taught quite successfully. On giving up pedagogy as a 
profession he turned to farming and the remainder of his life has been 
spent in this occupation. He has been very successful and owns one of 
the best producing farms in Montgomery county. In politics Cicero 
Dowlen is a member of the Democratic party, and for twenty-five years 
he has been magistrate in district No. 5. He is a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and takes much interest in all the inter- 
ests that he has in addition to his farming. A brother of Cicero Dow- 
len, Harris by name, served through the Civil war as a member of the 
Confederate army, but he was too young to enlist. Five children were 
born to Cicero Dowlen and his wife, namely, Harry; R. E., who owns 
part of the farm which Harry Dowlen operates; John S., who lives with 
his father; Coma, who also lives at the old homestead, and Erma, who 
is dead. Mrs. Dowlen died in 1904. She was a member and active 
worker in the Methodist Episcopal church, South. 

Harry Dowlen was educated at the schools in Montgomery county, 
attending two terms of school at ^lurfreesboro. He began work for 
his living on his father's farm and in 1905 he saved enough money to buy 
some land for himself. This property in which he owned a one-third in- 
terest was one hundred and twelve acres in extent. After a time he sold 
this land and went to east Tennessee, where he bought a one-third in- 
terest in four hundred acres. He only remained in that part of the 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1289 

state for a year, and on his return to Montgomery county he purchased 
his present farm of one hundred and thirty-four acres. In the August 
after his return he was elected magistrate, and now sixty-six years in 
this office have been rounded out by. the men of his family, for his father 
and grandfather held the office before him. Mr. Dowlen has served the 
public in other capacities, at the age of twenty-one being elected consta- 
ble, an office which he held for four years. Wheat and tobacco are his 
principal crops and he has met with great success in the cultivation of 
both commodities. This year he has forty-six acres planted in tobacco. 
Mr. Dowlen has never cared to take a very active part in fraternal 
affairs, but he is a member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, affiliating with the Clarksville chapter, No. 601. 

On the 13th of February, 1911, Mr. Dowlen was married to Ruth 
Marshall, of TuUahoma, Tennessee. Mrs. Dowlen is a daughter of W. A. 
Marshall, who is a wealthy and prominent resident of Tullahoma, having 
been mayor of that city for twenty years. 

John Horatio Clagett. Probably no member of the Hickman 
county bar is better or more favorably known than he whose name 
introduces this review. His grandfather came from the state, of Mary- 
land in 1817 and settled on Lick creek in Hickman county, where he 
was one of the first white men to enter land. After a residence of a 
few years there he removed to Bedford county, but some years later 
returned to Hickman county, where he was engaged in agricultural 
pursuits until his death in 1867. His son, Horatio Clagett, the father 
of the subject of this sketch, was born in District No. 2, Hickman 
county, January 18, 1819, and was one of a family of seven children. 
He was educated in the common schools of Hickman and Bedford 
counties and upon arriving at manhood formed a partnership with his 
brother and engaged in merchandising under the firm name of W. 6. 
& H. Clagett at Centerville. This association lasted for almost fifty 
years. In 1847 Horatio Clagett and Elizabeth Montgomery were 
united in marriage. She was born at Charlotte, Dickson county, Ten- 
nessee, in 1827. Of the seven children born to this marriage, five 
are still living. When the First National Bank was organized at Cen- 
terville in 1885, Horatio Clagett was elected the first president of the 
institution, which he held until the time of his death, December, 1912. 
About 1890 he disposed of his mercantile interests, and thereafter lived 
retired until his death. In his early years he was identified with the 
old Whig party, and after that organization was discontinued he 
affiliated with the Democratic party. His church relationship was with 
the Methodist Episcopal denomination, South, of which his wife was 
also a member until her death in February, 1908, and he was a Mason. 

John Horatio Clagett, the fifth child of his parents, was born at 
Centerville, June 4, 1859, and received his elementary education in 



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1290 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

the schools of his native county. He then attended Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity at Nashville, Tennessee, for two years, after which he entered 
the law department of the University at Lebanon, Tennessee, from which 
institution he received the degree of LL. B. in 1881. The same year 
he was admitted to practice at Centerville and formed a partnership 
with J. A. Bates, which association lasted until 1890, when Mr. Clagett 
removed to Union City. Three years later he returned to Centerville, 
where he practiced alone for some time and then formed a partnership 
with W. B. Flowers, now of Nashville, Tennessee. In 1912 the present 
firm of Knight & Clagett was formed and it occupies a prominent place 
in the legal affairs of Hickman and adjoining counties. For more 
than thirty years Mr. Clagett has been engaged in the practice of his 
chosen profession in his native state. His university training gave 
him the groundwork for a thorough understanding of the law, and his 
studies since leaving college have placed him among the well equipped 
attorneys of Tennessee. Conscientious in looking after the interests 
of his clients, careful in the preparation of his cases, and energetic in 
all matters pertaining to his business, he has achieved a measurable 
success in a practice that has covered practically all branches of the law. 
Mr. Clagett is a Democrat in his political views, a member of the 
Methodisl Episcopal church, South, and belongs to Sam Davis Lodge, 
No. 158, Knights of Pythias, of Centerville. In political, church and 
fraternal circles he has made many friends by his courteous demeanor 
and genial disposition. 

Joseph E. Justice. Whatever the vocation or calling, it is efficiency 
that finally determines the question of success. The profession of law 
requires a strong mentality and a keen discriminative ability, but it is 
only when such native talents are combined with patient study, investi- 
gation, training in reasoning and with a large capacity for the most 
laborious attention to detail that the lawyer attains a distinctive position 
in his profession. Well qualified in these different directions for the 
profession of his choice, Joseph E. Justice, of Ashland City, Tennessee, 
has won a foremost place at the Cheatham county bar. He is not only 
an able lawyer but is a representative of the native talent of Tennessee 
and of his own immediate vicinity, for he was born in the 13th civil dis- 
trict of Cheatham county, the date of his birth being May 17, 1866. He 
is also a representative of pioneer connections in this vicinity of Tennes- 
see and on the paternal side is a scion of Virginia ancestry, while his 
mother's people, the Hilands, were originally North Carolinians. The 
first of the Justice family here were the grandparents of Joseph E., 
both of whom were Virginians by birth and migrated to Tennessee in 
an early day. Their son James E., the father of our subject, became 
one of the prominent and well known men of Cheatham county. He was 
born in Coopertown, Robertson county, Tennessee, in 1834, and spent 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1291 

maDy years in the profession of teaching, being superintendent of public 
instruction in Cheatham county at the time of his death in 1869. In po- 
litical faith he was first a Whig, but on the breaking up of that party 
he became aligned with the Republican party. He wedded Ann J. Hi- 
land, who was bom in Cheatham county, Tennessee, in 1832, and sur- 
vived her husband many years, passing away in 1905 at the age of 
seventy-three. She was a member of the Presbyterian church, while Mr. 
Justice affiliated with the Missionary Baptist church. They became the 
parents of four children, three of whom are yet living, namely: Mrs. 
Effie Carroll, who resides in Dickson county, Tennessee; Joseph E. Jus- 
tice, of this review ; and Mrs. Jennie Cooley, whose home is near Union 
City, Tennessee. The parents of Mrs. Justice were George W. and Mar- 
tha A. (Morris) Hiland, the former of whom was a native of North 
Carolina and came to Robertson county, Tennessee, as a pioneer, becom- 
ing an extensive farmer and large slave holder there. Mrs. Hiland was 
born in Robertson county, this state. 

Joseph E. Justice grew up in Cheatham county, receiving his literary 
education at Ashland City and Dickson and his preparation for law at 
Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tennessee, from which institution he 
was graduated in 1904. He began the practice of law at Ashland City 
as a partner of J. C. Wilson, but later the firm dissolved and since 1906 
Mr. Justice has continued his professional labors there alone. He is ad- 
mitted to practice in all the courts and has demonstrated that ability as 
a lawyer that places him among the leading members of the Cheatham 
county bar. He is the legal representative of the Ayer & Lord Tie 
Company, which is very extensively engaged in the timber business in 
this section, and he was one of the organizers and one of the first direct- 
ors of the Ashland City Bank & Trust Company, in which he yet re- 
tains an interest. Mr. Justice has been largely dependent upon his own 
resources in making his way in life and has employed them to that 
advantage that today he is a man of competence, as well as a lawyer of 
well established reputation and practice. In political views he is a 
Democrat and a staunch supporter of his party, and at one time was the 
Democratic candidate for the office of attorney-general of the ninth 
judicial district. Fraternally he is a member of the Knights of Pythias 
and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has filled the executive 
offices in the local lodge of each of these orders. 

In November, 1897, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Justice and 
Miss Lula Lenox, daughter of Judge J. J. Lenox, who was a prominent 
member of the Cheatham county bar for many years and was also a 
wealthy farmer. Mrs. Justice, who was a devoted and consistent mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church. South, died in December, 1904, 
leaving three children : Kathleen, James E., and Mary A., all of whom 



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1292 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

are now attending school. Mr. Justice also is a member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, South. 

Rev* James T. Bagby. No matter to what denomination ministers 
of the Gospel may belong, nor how much they may differ as to the fund- 
amental principles and theories of theology, there is one point upon 
which they agree and one end for which they are working — and that is 
the elevation of the general moral tone of the whole people. The in- 
fluence of their teaching is felt far beyond the immediate confines of 
their respective congregations. It is reflected in the probity of the citi- 
zen, the loyalty of the soldier, the sanctity of the home, the education of 
the young, and in many other ways in all walks of life, even upon those 
who never attend church and who claim to doubt many of the precepts 
taught by the followers of the Master. For the work of the pastor Rev. 
J. T. Bagby is well qualified by natural disposition, training and expe- 
rience, and although one of the youngest ministers of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. South, in the state, he has made a reputation that for 
one of his years is rarely equaled. 

Mr. Bagby was born in Decatur county, Tennessee, May 14, 1879, 
and is a descendant of one of the state's pioneer families, his paternal 
grandfather and grandmother having come from North Carolina at an 
early date. He is the seventh in a family of ten children born to James 
L. and Martha (Rushing) Bagby, both natives of Tennessee. One of 
his brothers is also a Methodist minister. He was educated in the com- 
mon schools while being brought up on his father's farm in Henderson 
county, Tennessee, and afterward attended Scott's Hill Normal Insti- 
tute at Scott's Hill, graduating with honors, and the McTyeire Insti- 
tute at McKenzie, Tennessee, graduating with great honors as a debater 
and as a linguist with no superiors. In 1906 he was made a deacon in the 
church, at that time becoming a member, in full connection, of the 
Memphis conference, and in 1908 was ordained an elder. His first charge 
was Bethel and Selmer, a double station in the Lexington district, where 
he served his congregation with zeal and fidelity until he was called to 
Columbus, Kentucky, three years later, where he added to his reputation 
as a conscientious, intelligent and faithful worker in the vineyard. In 
1911 he was assigned to his present pastorate at Obion, Tennessee, after 
a four-years' pastorate at Columbus. Mr. Bagby is a diligent student of 
all questions relating to his profession. He has an extensive vocabulary 
and a faultless enunciation; his sentences are well rounded and com- 
plete, and his manner of presentation of a subject is both instructive and 
entertaining. Outside of his pulpit he is a genial gentleman and sympa- 
thetic pastor, and among his brother clergymen he has attained to a high 
position through his eloquent and scholarly sermons and his earnest 
work in behalf of the church along all lines. His church at Obion has 
over two hundred members and under his administration this number 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1293 

is constantly increasing. Those who know him best predict for him still 
greater charges and more onerous duties in the future. 

In 1905 Mr. Bagby was united in marriage with Miss Daisy Stead- 
man, daughter of John H. Steadman, and to this union has been born 
one son — Thomas S. Mrs. Bagby is well fitted for the duties of a pas- 
tor's wife and co-operates with her husband in all his efforts for the ad- 
vancement of the church aind Sunday school. 

It is worthy of more than passing mention in connection with the his- 
tory of this family, that Levi Bagby, an uncle of Eev. J. T. Bagby, was 
a valiant soldier in the Federal army during the great Civil war and 
rose to the rank of brigadier general, thus giving the name a permanent 
place in history as belonging to a loyal citizen in the dark days when the 
Union was threatened with disruption. 

Adam Diehl. A citizen of worth and ability, Adam Diehl of the firm, 
of Diehl & Lord has been prominently identified with the business inter- 
ests of Nashville for almost half a century, and during the time has won 
for himself a fine reputation as one who deserves for himself the confi- 
dence and trust of his fellow men. A son of Peter Diehl, he was born 
October 12, 1846, in Louisville, Kentucky, of thrifty German ancestry. 

Born in Bavaria, Germany, where his parents were lifelong residents, 
Peter Diehl attended school regularly until sixteen years of age, when he 
came with two of his brothers, Adam Diehl and Jacob Diehl, to the 
United States, locating in Cincinnati, Ohio. Learning the tailor's trade, 
he I'esided in that city six years. Going then to Louisville, Kentucky, he 
established himself as a merchant tailor, and there carried on a good 
business until his death, at- the age of seventy-seven years. He married 
Margaret Schwartz, who was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylva- 
nia, where her father, John Schwartz, located as a farmer on coming to 
this country from Westphalia, Germany, his native place. She died at 
the age of sixty-seven years. Fourteen children were born of their 
marriage, a family of which the parents were justly proud. 

In the city of his birth Adam Diehl acquired a practical education in 
the different branches there taught. Leaving school at the age of 
eighteen years, he was there employed as a bookkeeper for three years. 
On attaining his majority Mr. Diehl located in Nashville, Tennessee, 
where he established his present business, which is both extensive and 
remunerative. Since taking up his residence in Nashville, Mr. Diehl has 
ever evinced an active interest in municipal affairs, and his influence 
and assistance are always sought in behalf of undertakings for the pub- 
lic good, and for the advancement of the best interests of the community. 

Mr. Diehl is married and has six children, namely : Edward, Marga- 
ret, Jack B., Walter, Prank and Ruth. Fraternally Mr. Diehl is a mem- 
ber of the Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons ; of the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks ; of the Improved Order of Red Men 



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1294 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

and of the Order of Moose. He is an ex-member of the city council and 
during his connection therewith he did effective work for the city. 

Lee Elliott. An able citizen of Montgomery county and a lifelong 
resident of the community is Lee Elliott, who eflSciently combines the 
time-honored occupation of farming with the useful services of dentistry. 
His is a capable individuality, made up of interestingly blended ances- 
tral elements. North Carolina had been the home of his maternal grand- 
parents, Garaldus and Mary (Marshall) Pickering, who early settled in 
Tennessee; here was born their daughter, Judith Pickering, her birth- 
place being in this county and about one and one-half miles distant 
from the present Elliott home. Near the time of the Pickerings' removal 
to Tennessee, this state had also become the home of David Elliott and 
Sallie (Cook) Elliott, his wife — the former a native of Pennsylvania and 
the latter of Ireland. To them was bom in Port Royal on March 22, 
1819, a son whom they named George H. This boy and the little girl, 
Judith Pickering, grew up together as childhood sweethearts and in 1840 
they were married. Of the ten children born to them Lee Elliott was the 
fifth, his brothers and sisters being as follows ; John A., who is deceased ; 
David G., a resident of Port Royal ; William S. Elliott, M. D., now de- 
ceased; Stonewall Jackson Elliott, who lives with Dr. Lee Elliott; 
Jacqueline, deceased^ Marinda, widow of C. Gardner of Clarksville; 
Henrie, the third daughter, who is now Mrs. T. G. Ezelle, of Woodford; 
Alice, who is Mrs. A. D. Rhinehardt of Port Royal ; and Sallie, deceased. 

The Elliott home, during the childhood of George Elliott's children, 
was the farm on which Dr. Elliott now lives ; for the father of the family 
had given up his inherited occupation in order to give his attention to 
farming. There it was that on February 14, 1867, Lee Elliott was born. 

After a general education in the public schools, a professional course 
was sought by the young man, Lee Elliott. He entered the College of 
Dentistry of Vanderbilt University, where he pursued the prescribed 
study, and was graduated in 1898, receiving the degree of Doctor of 
Dental Surgery. 

Resuming his location on his attractive rural property. Dr. Elliott 
proceeded to engage in the activities of his profession. He has estab- 
lished a large country practice, for his skilled services are in considera- 
ble demand. He also supervises the work on his farm of 225 acres, 
which has been extended to that size from the one hundred acres which 
had been owned by his father. His land produces very satisfactory crops 
of such useful products as wheat, corn and tobacco. 

Dr. Elliott is a Democrat in politics, as was his father, and is also, 
like the latter, a prominent member of the order of Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons. The Independent Order of Odd Fellows is another se- 
cret organization which claims the doctor's membership. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1295 

Milton S. Elkin, a prominent factor in the business circles of Gal- 
latin, is a young man who well represents the younger generation of en- 
ergetic and enterprising business talent of Tennessee, and of his native 
city of Gallatin. He was born May 12, 1884, to Milton S. and Mattie 
(Moore) Elkin. The senior Milton S. Elkin, born in Scott county, Ken- 
tucky, October 9, 1840, was educated in Pennsylvania and took up law 
as his life pursuit. The field of his professional practice was at Gallatin 
and at Nashville, Tennessee, and he became both sliccessful and promi- 
nent as a lawyer. In 1865 he married Mattie Moore, born in 1845 in 
Kentucky, a daughter of Joseph and Mary S. (Herndon) Moore. Mr. 
and Mrs. Moore were natives respectively of North Carolina and Vir- 
ginia, but after their marriage they became residents of Kentucky and 
remained there until their deaths. Mr. Moore farmed extensively and 
owned a large number of slaves. He was a prominent man in his com- 
munity and served for many years as a justice of the peace. Mrs. Elkin 
was educated in the female college at Hopkinsville, Kentucky. She is 
yet living and divides her home between Gallatin and Lebanon. 

Milton S. Elkin, the immediate subject of this sketch, has spent 
practically his whole life in Gallatin. After receiving his education in 
Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tennessee, he entered upon an inde- 
pendent and active business career as a dry goods merchant at Gallatin, 
in which line of activity he continued four years. Subsequently several 
years were spent in the insurance business, and then in 1909 he bought 
a livery business in Gallatin, to which he has since given his attention.* 
The possessor of naturally keen business acumen and a good stock of en- 
ergy and industry, he has made each of his ventures a profitable one 
and in a comparatively brief period has become recognized as one of 
the forceful business men of the city. He is a stanch supporter of the 
Democratic party in political affairs and is now serving as a councilman 
of Gallatin. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Masonic order, 
the Woodmen of the World and the Loyal Order of Moose. In religious 
faith and church membership he is identified with the Baptist denomina- 
tion. He is highly regarded as one of Gallatin's honorable business men 
and exemplary young citizens and his congenial and pleasant disposition 
make him a popular member of the circles, business, church and social, 
in which he mingles. 

Smfth PAMUiY OP Sumner County. In Sumner county is the fa- 
mous family seat, Rock Castle, now a century and a quarter old, and 
through many generations the home and center of family associations 
and memories of the Smith family and its related branches. The pres- 
ent owner of this historic estate is Mrs. Horatio Berry of Henderson- 
ville, and one of the descendants of this old home. The founder of this 
branch of the Smith family was Henry Smith, who came from England 
and first settled in Maryland, and later moved to Stafford county, Vir- 



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1296 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

ginia. He married Sarah Crosby, and one of their children was Gen. 
Daniel Smith, the founder of the family in Tennessee, and the builder 
of Rock Castle. 

Daniel Smith was born in Stafford county, Virginia, on October 29, 
1748, and died at his home in Rock Castle in Sumner county. He was 
educated at William and Mary College, and, like many of the young men 
of talent of his day, became a surveyor. In 1771 he married Sarah 
Michie, of the eastern shore of Maryland, and soon afterwards settled 
upon the western waters. He was appointed deputy surveyor of Augusta 
county in 1773. At that time Augusta county embraced nearly all of 
southwestern Virginia. Mr. Smith settled in that part of the county 
which later formed Botetourt, then Pincastle, then Washington and fin- 
ally Russell county. His place was on Clinch river, twelve miles below 
Blackmore's Port at Maxwell's Hill. It was known as Smith's Station, 
though the fort was called Port Christian. This was in the advance 
guard of settlement thrown across the Alleghenies, previous to the Rev- 
olution, and which had remarkable results in holding all the central west 
as far as the Mississippi river within the possessions of the American 
colonies after the Revolutionary war. 

As early as 1774 Mr. Smith was captain in the colonial troops, and 
was one of the most active company commanders in Dunmore's war. 
The correspondence which passed between him and his superior oflScers 
shows him to be a man of education beyond most men of his day. He 
participated in the crucial battle of Point Pleasant on the Ohio river in 
October, 1774, this engagement being regarded by his friends as one of 
the most important fought on the western slope of the Alleghenies dur- 
ing the eighteenth century. He was also active in many engagements 
with the Indians throughout this country. During the Revolution his 
station was on the frontier, guarding against the combined attacks of 
Indians and British. He was a member of the committee of safety for 
Pincastle county in 1775, and of a committee that sent resolutions to the 
Continental Congress July 15, 1775, in which they declared that they 
would *' never surrender their inestimable privileges to any power on 
earth but at the expense of their lives.'' 

When Washington county was organized, Captain Smith was ap- 
pointed one of the justices of the peace by Governor Patrick Henry. 
December 21, 1776. On the same day he was appointed major of Wash- 
ington county militia. In 1780 he was appointed sheriff of Washington 
county, and the next year, upon the reorganization of the militia, he 
was commissioned colonel in the second battalion. In 1779 he was ap- 
pointed with Dr. Thomas Walker to extend the line between Virginia 
and North Carolina, which line had been run by Jefferson and others. 
He was in the battle of King 's Mountain, and soon after the close of the 
war in 1783, with the Bledsoes, Shelbys, Blackmores, Neeleys and others 
came to Tennessee. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1297 

As one of the pioneers of Tennessee, Major Smith located a large body 
of valuable land near the present town of Hendersonville in Sumner 
county. In 1784 he began the building of Rock Castle, but owing to the 
depredations of the Indians, the house was seven years in being com- 
pleted. It is constructed of cut stone, has seven large rooms, and is as 
sound today as when built and has been **the roof tree" of five genera- 
tions, and is now the property of Mrs. Horatio Berry, a great-great- 
granddaughter of General Smith. Two carpenters engaged in the con- 
struction of the house left work one Saturday afternoon to fish in Drake's 
creek nearby and were killed by the Indians. Two youths, one a son of 
Col. Anthony Bledsoe, and the other a son of his brother, Isaac Bled- 
soe, were living at General Smith's and attending school at Henderson- 
ville, and were killed by prowling Indians. Samuel Donelson, who was 
General Jackson's law partner, married General Smith's only daughter. 
He died of pneumonia while on a visit to the Hermitage. 

In 1790 General Smith was appointed by President Washington 
secretary of the ceded territory south of the Ohio. He was elected by the 
first legislature of Tennessee, one of the four presidential electors. In 
1798 he succeeded Andrew Jackson in the senate of the United States, 
and was again elected in 1805 and served until 1809. In 1793, in the 
absence of Governor Blount, he acted as governor of the territory. He 
was a member of the constitutional convention of 1796. He made the 
first map of Tennessee, published by Carey of Philadelphia, and used by 
Imlay in 1794. Michaux, a French botanist and noted traveler, who 
passed through this section of the country in 1802, and after his return 
to Prance, published an interesting book of travel, speaks of his visit 
to General Smith, of the beautiful fields of cotton and com which sur- 
rounded his house, of the translations of foreign works his library con- 
tained, and of the quiet studious and exemplary life led by a retired 
public servant. Living at a time when many public men were justly or 
unjustly the object, not only of censure, but of oflScial accusation, it is 
worth while to publish the following from Jeflferson's paper: ** Daniel 
Smith was a practical surveyor whose work never needed correction. For 
intelligence, well cultivated talents, for integrity and usefulness, in 
soundness of judgment, in the practice of virtue, and in shunning vice, 
he was equalled by few men and in the purity of motive excelled by 
none. ' ' 

Smith county in Tennessee was named in honor of General Smith, 
and he was easily one of the foremost among Tennessee's distinguished 
ieitizens during the making and founding of this state. 

The only daughter of General Smith and wife was Mary, familiarly 
known as Polly. Samuel Donelson, the son of a neighbor, was the object 
of her affections, but there were parental objections to the successful 
culmination of their romance. The story of how they overcame the 
difficulties in the pathway of love is about as follows. One night in 1797, 



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1298 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

when Polly was in her sixteenth year, her suitor Donelson and Andrew 
Jackson, afterwards president of the United States, placed a sapling lad- 
der beneath her window. In this manner she quietly left Rock Castle, 
and got up behind Jackson on horseback and the party crossed the 
river below Rock Castle, and went to what was known as the Hunter's 
Hill neighborhood where the marriage was performed. Polly Donel- 
son never returned to Rock Castle, until after her husband's death, and 
she was left a widow with three children. These children were : John, 
who served in the Creek war and died soon afterward; Andrew Jack- 
son ; and Daniel Smith. Andrew J. Donelson became a protege of Presi- 
denf Andrew Jackson, and under the influence of that great political 
leader, received many, promotions in public life. Daniel S. Donelson, 
the third son of Polly built and lived in the brick house which is now 
the home of Mrs. Horatio Berry. 

This sketch cannot be properly brought to an end, without the inser- 
tion of a document which contains much interesting reminiscence and 
statement of facts concerning some of Tennessee's most noted char- 
acters. It is the statement of Mrs. Daniel Smith, the widow of General 
Daniel Smith, and it is quoted practically without change as follows: 
. *'As well as I remember Mr. Smith and myself settled here in the 
year 1784. At that period, or shortly after that, Mrs. Donelson and 
family were among the families who came and settled on the south 
side of Cumberland river, where though they were but a few miles 
from me, yet in consequence of the river running between us, and the 
danger of visiting in those days, I did not become acquainted with them 
for two or three years after. The family, however, were universally 
spoken of as one of the most respectable and worthy of the whole 
country. The first time I ever saw Mrs. Jackson, then Mrs. Robards, 
was at the station of Colonel Mansker. One of her brothers had not 
long before brought her from Kentucky, where she and Mr. Robards 
had married and settled. The cause of her return to Tennessee was 
then attributed to the cruel and unjust treatment of her husband, who 
was spoken of everywhere as a man of irregular habits and much 
given to jealous suspicions. About two years after I first saw Mrs. 
Robards, I learned that Robards had arrived in this country and by the 
assistance of the family of his wife, that their differences had been 
reconciled and that they were again living together at Mrs. Donel- 
son 's. They were not long together, however, before the same unhappy 
apprehensions seized the mind of Robards, the consequence of which, 
was another separation, and as it soon appeared, a final one. All the 
circumstances attending this rupture, I cannot attempt to state at this 
late day, but it is hardly possible, considering the free and unreserved 
intercourse that prevailed among all the respectable classes of people 
here, that an incident of this kind should occur without being fully and 
generally known and that every person should concur in the same upon 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1299 

its character, without the best reasons. In this transaction, Mr. Robards 
alone was censured and I never heard a respectable man or woman 
intimate that his wife differed from the most virtuous and prudent 
female. General Jackson boarded at the time in the home of Mrs. 
Donelson, and it was the general belief that his character and standing, 
added to his engaging and sprightly manners, were enough to influence 
the mind of poor Robards, addicted as he was to vicious habits and the 
most childish suspicions. Mr. Robards had not long been gone from 
Tennessee, when information was received here that he had obtained 
a divorce from his wife. Whether the information came by a letter or 
by a newspaper from Virginia addressed to my husband, I cannot 
say with certainty, but think by the latter. It was after this informa- 
tion came that General Jackson married Mrs. Robards and I recollect 
well the observation of the Rev. Mr. Craighead in relation to the mar- 
riage. It was, that it was a happy change for Mrs. Robards and highly 
creditable to General Jackson, who by this act of his life evinced his 
own magnanimity, as well as the purity and innocence of Mrs. Robards. 
And such was the sentiment of all my acquaintances. Since this period, 
I have lived in a few miles of Mrs. Jackson and have never been 
acquainted with a lady more exemplary in deportment or one to whom 
a greater share of the respect and regard of friends and acquaintances 
can be awarded. 

** Given at my plantation in Sumner county. State of Tennessee, 
on the sixteenth day of December, 1826 — Sally Smith." 

Martin V. Bruce. Fortune ofttimes seems a capricious goddess, 
smiling at one time and frowning at another, but in the end she sel- 
dom refuses her favors to those who have proved worthy of them, who 
with grit and determination refuse to succumb to adverse circum- 
stances or to countenance failure but with undaunted courage over- 
come the difficulties that beset them and steadily but firmly press 
forward toward the goal of success. In taking account of the men 
who have been contributors to the progress of Tennessee we take pleas- 
ure in presenting a brief review of the career of Martin V. Bruce, 
of Bruces Switch, Obion county, who by what he has accomplished has 
demonstrated that success is largely a matter of character; that while 
education, influence and capital are invaluable aids to him who knows 
how to use them, the young man who has not been favored by these 
aids but who possesses native ability, pluck and resolution may be an 
equally forceful factor in society. 

Martin V. Bruce began life in Perry county, Tennessee, on Sep- 
tember 24, 1848. He had no educational advantages, no financial aid 
from parent or friends, and had but his own native resources on which 
to rely in getting a start in life and for waging his contest for success 
in life. Today he is the owner of eight hundred acres of land in Obion 



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1300 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

county, seven hundred acres of which is under cultivation and produce 
large crops of cotton, com and wheat, being also the owner of other 
valuable business interests. His eight hundred acre tract lies in a body, 
with nine tenant houses and from sixty-five to seventy people. He 
rents it to tenants. He also has a store at Bruces Switch which he 
manages in connection with his farm and saw mill. He began as a 
farmer, in a very modest way at first, experiencing the varying suc^ 
cesses and failures incident to that vocation but steadily gaining the 
while until he had accumulated the capital which warranted more 
independent and larger agricultural operations. In 1900 he also 
entered into the manufacture of lumber at Bruce 's Crossing, Obion 
county, and is yet identified with that business. His mill is run by 
steam and is lighted by electricity generated at the mill and his force 
averages sixteen workmen. All of this represents years of untiring 
industry on the part of Mr. Bruce and native business genius well 
applied. 

In 1867 he was joined in marriage to Miss Sarah A. Taylor, born 
in Obion county, Tennessee. To their union were bom twelve chil- 
dren, eight of whom grew to maturity and six of whom are now liv- 
ing. Three died young, James J. died at the age of sixteen and of 
those who grew to maturity, Laura is the wife of C. T. Arnold, of Ken- 
ton, Tennessee ; Ella married Ed Prunington and died at about twenty- 
seven years of age; George W. is a farmer of this county; Nevada is 
the wife of A. J. McNeely, of this county; Elbert R., of St. Louis, 
Missouri, is connected with a loan and trust company; Martin V., Jr., 
is a farmer at Amson, Texas ; John A., is a farmer in this county ; and 
Lexie married E. L. Peoples, and died January 6, 1913. Mr. Bruce is 
a son of James and Pearly (Hooper) Bruce, who came to Tennessee 
from South Carolina and of whose eight children he is third in birth. 
Both he and his wife are members of the Baptist church, and he is a 
Democrat in his political views, but would never accept oflSce. 

Jesse Allen. While Tennessee may well be proud of her states- 
men and her soldiers, and freely acknowledge her indebtedness to 
them, yet she is equally indebted to those captains of industry who 
have been contributors in advancing her commercial prestige. In the 
following lines is presented a brief outline of the career of Jesse Allen, 
a retired capitalist of Burns, Tennessee, who both as a soldier and as 
a business man has honored the state that gave him birth. He was one 
of thousands of Southern young men left at the close of the Civil war 
with nothing but those resources within themselves with which to wage 
their contest for success in life. Today Mr. Allen is one of the wealthy 
men of Dickson county. He began under the spur of necessity, but he 
had courage and integrity, a large capacity for business, and was 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1301 

willing to strike hard'blows; such men seldom fail of the merited reward 
of their labors. 

Born in Henry county, Tennessee, May 15, 1840, his life was spent 
on the paternal farm until the opening of hostilities between the states 
in 1861, when he enlisted in Company D, of the Tenth Tennessee Regi- 
ment of mounted infantry, of which N. N. Cox, of Franklin, was colonel. 
He served throughout the war and participated in many of the hardest 
fought battles of that conflict but escaped being wounded or cap- 
tured. Hardships and privation had been the common lot of the sol- 
diery of the South during the latter part of the war. At its close young 
Allen went to Nashville, where at the home of an uncle he was clothed 
and fed, and for some time he was employed there with these neces- 
sities as his only remuneration, though at that time they were luxuries 
to him. Later he became an employe in the A. H. Hurley mercantile 
establishment, where he remained three years and by his ability and 
fidelity to his employers' interests won promotion to the position of 
foreman. Following that he clerked for a time for D. Weil & Company, 
a Jew, and then went to Murfreesboro, where he sold goods at auction 
and also peddled goods through the country. Later he opened a store 
at Murfreesboro but it was burned after a few years and then Mr. 
Allen went into business again, opening a first-class drygoods store in 
the heart of the business section. After several years at Murfreesboro 
he went to Greenville, Mississippi, but he only remained a short time 
and then returned to Nashville, Tennessee, where he became a travel- 
ing salesman for a wholesale house in Nashville. After ten years spent 
in this line of activity he, in partnership with the wholesale firm he 
represented, bought a large quarry and lime kiln in Dickson county 
for $15,000. Of this Mr. Allen became manager and from time to time 
he added to his interests in the establishment until finally he became its 
sole owner. This he has developed until its present capacity is four 
cars of lime per day. It is one of the largest plants of its kind in the 
state, has its own spurs and railroad sidings, and is valued at $100,000. 
It pays the heaviest taxes of any business concern in Dickson county and 
employs on an average of fifty men, though frequently it has double 
that force in its service. 

Richard H. Allen, the father of our subject, was born January 1, 
•1807, in Halifax, Virginia, and came to Williamson county, Tennessee, 
with his parents when he was sixteen years of age. He served a three 
years' apprenticeship at carpentry at Franklin, Tennessee, and from 
there in 1831 went to Paris, Tennessee, then a new town, where he 
acted as foreman in the construction of many of the early buildings of 
that place. There he was married in 1833 to Elizabeth Parker, who 
was born in North Carolina, in 1814, and was a daughter of James 
Parker, a large slave owner in this state. Of the fourteen children 
born to this union, Jesse is seventh in birth and is one of five now 

VoLV— 7 



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1302 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

living. After his marriage Richard H. Allen took up farming in Henry 
county and continued in that occupation until his death, he too being 
a large slave holder. His first wife died in March, 1874, and he after- 
wards married Mrs. Annie Caldwell, widow of Preston Caldwell. In 
politics he was a Whig and in religious faith both he and the mother 
of our subject were devout Baptists. He was a son of Lawson Allen, 
a soldier in the War of 1812, who settled in Williamson county of 
this state about 1823. 

While a resident of Murfreesboro Mr. Allen, our subject, was mar- 
ried in 1871 to Miss America Smith, of Murfreesboro, and to their union 
two children were born: John R. and Jesse A. John R., whose birth 
occurred in 1872, died in 1897. Jessie A., became the wife of Andrew 
D. Clark, now manager of the Jesse Allen Lime Kiln. Mrs. Allen died 
December 2, 1876, at Nashville, and in 1882, Mr. Allen wedded Adelia 
Ware, daughter of John W. Ware, of Cannon county, Tennessee. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
South. Mr. Allen gives his political allegiance to the Democratic party 
but is a stanch believer in prohibition and has labored zealously to pro- 
mote prohibition in Tennessee. Imbued with the spirit of charity, he 
gives liberally of his means to relieve the needy. Mr. Allen is now 
retired from active business and is enjoying the leisure well deserved 
as the reward of years of energetic and fruitful endeavor. Mr. and 
Mrs. Allen now usually spend their winters in Orlando, Florida, where 
they have a handsome home. 

Jesse Kent Sparks is a representative of the younger native legal 
talent of Tennessee and has chosen his native county of Perry as the 
immediate field of his endeavors in carving out a legal career. Though 
he has been before the bar but a little more than three years and has 
yet had barely time to prove his merits as a lawyer, he has given evi- 
dence of that ability and that ambition and energetic spirit which 
presages that he will steadily progress success ward. His name is a 
familiar one in this locality as he is the third in line of descent to bear 
it here, and his great-grandfather, also named Jesse, was for many years 
a resident of the adjoining county of Hickman. The family originated 
in Tennessee with the latter, who came here from his native state of 
Georgia and settled in Hickman county, passing the remainder of his 
career in that locality as a farmer. His son Jesse grew to manhood in 
Hickman county but subsequently removed to Perry county, where at 
the age of forty-five he was united in marriage to Mrs. Polly Homer. 
He became one of the prominent farmers of that county and passed 
away there at the age of eighty. In politics he was a stanch Democrat. 
To his marriage was bom one son, Jesse, who is the father of our sub- 
ject. Jesse Sparks was bom at Lick Creek, Perry county, Tennessee, 
in 1862, and has spent his whole life in his native county. He was edu- 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1303 

cated in the public schools in the vicinity of his birth and at McKenzie 
and Centerville, Tennessee, and began his independent career as an 
agriculturist, locating on the Lick Creek farm of his father. As years 
have passed he has become one of the well known and prominent men 
of Perry county and was its representative in the Tennessee state legis- 
lature in 1909 and 1910. Politically he is an adherent of the Demo- 
cratic party. He is a director of the First National Bank at Linden. 
In 1886 he wedded Miss Minerva Ledbetter, a native of Perry county 
and a daughter of H. M. Ledbetter, a well-known farmer of Perry 
county. Two children came to this union: Jesse Kent Sparks of this 
review, and Ammah, who is now Mrs. D. E. Starbuck and resides at 
Linden. 

Jesse Kent Sparks, bom July 17, 1888, first pursued his educational 
training in the Branham and Hughes school at Spring Hill, Tennessee, 
later becoming a student in Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tennes- 
see, from which institution he was graduated in 1908 with the degree of 
LL. B. As he was then but twenty years old and not of legal age he 
was not admitted to the bar until the following year of 1909. He then 
took up the practice of law at Linden, Perry county, where he has 
continued to the present time. Full of the vigor of young manhood, 
able, energetic and well prepared in technical training, we feel safe in 
predicting that in due time he will be numbered among the foremost 
members of the Perry county bar and as one of the most forceful 
men of that community. He is also at the present time the postmaster 
at Linden, Tennessee, and editor of the Perry County News. He is an 
enthusiastic Democrat and an active and eflScient worker in behalf of 
his party. Fraternally he is aflBliated with Linden Lodge No, 210, Free 
and Accepted Masons, and with Chapter No. 156, Eoyal Arch Masons, 
and is also a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. South. He is 
unmarried. 

James Edwabd Smith. One of the prominent and highly respected 
citizens of Linden, Perry county, Tennessee, is James Edward Smith, 
cashier of the First National Bank of Linden, who has formed a wide 
acquaintance during his twelve years or more of residence there and 
who by his force, probity of character and honorable business methods 
has become recognized as a business man of worth and a citizen of high 
principles. 

He was bom near Wartrace, Bedford county, Tennessee, January 
26, 1876, and represents a family that was established there full a cen- 
tury ago. After completing his educational studies in the Brandon 
Training School at Wartrace, Tennessee, he entered the Bedford County 
Bank at Wartrace, as bookkeeper, and from there he came to Linden, 
Tennessee, in 1899, to take up the duties of cashier in the Perry County 
Bank, of which he became also a stockholder and director. In 1912 



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1304 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

the bank was reorganized as the First National Bank of Linden, in 
which Mr. Smith still continues to hold the responsible position of 
cashier. As a financier he is conservative, yet progressive, and is 
deeply interested in furthering the prosperity of his community. The 
First National Bank of Linden has a capital of $25,000, a surplus of 
$8,000, with deposits averaging $75,000, and has won a large confidence 
and patronage in this community. Mr. Smith also holds farming inter- 
ests in Perry county. 

The first of the family in Tennessee was James Edward Smith, the 
grandfather of our subject, who located in Bedford county. He was 
well educated and taught school there for many years, but later in life 
turned his attention to farming. He married a Miss Stokes, who bore 
him four children, the eldest of whom was Jasper Newton Smith, the 
father of our subject. The grandfather and his brothers joined the 
emigration to California in 1849, but the former died on the way. 
His brothers continued on to California and located there. Jasper New- 
ton Smith, born November 28, 1828, in Bedford county, Tennessee, 
remained in his native county, where he became a prominent and well- 
to-do farmer. He married Sarah Elizabeth Caruthers, also a native 
of Bedford county, and to their union were born twelve children, of 
which family James Edward Smith of this review is next to the young- 
est and is one of the eight children now living. Jasper Newton Smith 
passed away in Bedford county in March, 1912, at the advanced age 
of eighty-four years, and had been preceded in death many years by his 
wife, whose demise occurred in 1888. He was a Democrat in politics 
and served as a Confederate soldier during the Civil war. Both he and 
his wife were consistent members of the Baptist church. 

James Edward Smith was married in 1900 to Miss Addie Starbuck, 
daughter of the late Daniel Starbuck, of Linden, Tennessee. They have 
five children, named: Leila, Elizabeth, Lena, James Edward, Jr., and 
Ben Daniel. Both ]Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members of the Christian 
<»hurch, and in political sentiment and allegiance Mr. Smith is a Demo- 
crat. He is prominently aflBliated with the Masonic order as a mem- 
ber of Linden Lodge No. 210, Linden Chapter No. 156, Jackson Council, 
and of Tennessee Consistory No. 1, at Memphis, in which he has 
attained the thirty-second degree of the Scottish Rite. 

Daniel Eugene Starbuck. A young and energetic figure in the 
business circles of Linden, Tennessee, is Daniel Eugene Starbuck, assis- 
tant cashier of the First National Bank of Linden and a representative 
of one of the wealthy and prominent business families of Perry county. 
Paternally the family is of Irish lineage and originated in this country 
with the grandfather of Daniel Eugene Starbuck, who emigrated from 
Ireland along in the forepart of the last century and settled in Ten- 
nessee, where his attention was given to farming. Daniel Starbuck, his 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1305 

son and the father of our subject, was born in Perry county, this 
state, in 1853. He grew up here and received such educational advan- 
tages as the public school of the time afforded, but he was ambitious for 
a better knowledge than he could thus obtain and by self-instruction 
and extensive reading he sought diligently to correct those deficiencies, 
finally becoming by those means a well educated and informed man. 
He engaged in the lumber business in Perry county and became a well 
known and prominent business man in this connection, being very suq- 
cessful in his operations and accumulating a large estate. He passed 
away here in 1906 and at the time of his death was president of the 
' Perry County Bank at Linden. His political tenets were those of the 
Republican party and in a fraternal way he was identified with the 
Masonic order. In 1881, at Linden, Tennessee, he was joined in mar- 
riage to Frances Eugenia Harris, who was born in Perry county in 1859 
and preceded her husband in death, her demise having occurred in 
1901. Seven children came to their union, as follows : Ethel, now Mrs. 
E. J. Ayers; Addie, the wife of J. E. Smith, who receives individual 
mention in this work; Bessie, who is now Mrs. C. W. Brown; John E., 
Sam H. and Daniel E., the three sons; and Lena, deceased. Both par- 
ents were members of the Christian church. After the death of his 
first wife, Daniel Starbuck, the father, wedded Eureka Hufstedler, of 
Perry county, and to this union was born a son, Thomas Reed Star- 
buck. 

Daniel Eugene Starbuck was born at Linden, Tennessee, June 28, 
1891, was educated at Branham & Hughes Preparatory School at Spring 
Hill, Tennessee, and entered upon his business career as a bookkeeper 
for the Nashville Trust Company, at Nashville. He continued in that 
position until 1910, when he came to Linden to take up the duties of 
assistant cashier in the First National Bank of Linden, his present 
position. He is also a stockholder in that institution. In political affairs 
his allegiance is given to the Republican party. 

In 1910 he was married to Miss Ammah Sparks, daughter of Jesse 
Sparks, a prominent farmer and capitalist of Perry county and a rep- 
resentative in the state legislature in 1909 and 1910. Mr. and Mrs. 
Starbuck are both members of the Methodist Episcopal church. South, 
and are numbered among the most estimable young people of Linden. 

D. A. Payne. Of a high personal status in both the real-estate and 
insurance business ; of a family noted in both lines as one of substantial 
worth ; of prominent church and lodge ^connections and of good social 
standing, the life of D. A. Payne is one to which should be accorded a 
biography as full as our data will permit. 

The maternal line of Mr. Payne's progenitors was that of the Vir- 
ginia family of Darden. David Darden (grandfather of D. A. Payne) 
was born in the Old Dominion State, whence he came in an early period 



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1306 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

to Robertson county, Tennessee, settling in Springfield and becoming 
the proprietor of the first inn ever conducted at that place. He was the 
father of Susan T. Darden (who later became Mrs. Payne and the 
mother of our subject) and also of George W.. Darden, well known as 
one of the best financiers not only of Tennessee, but of the entire South, 
also being, at the time of his death, one of the members of the Nashville 
Board of Control. George W. Darden was most highly honored by the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, who joined with the Nashville city 
council in making his burial one of great pomp and the most largely 
attended ceremony ever held in Springfield, a chartered train of ten, 
cars from the capitol city being paid for by the civic bodies mentioned. 
No less estimable than the Darden family was that of Warren Payne, 
also of Virginia, and also of early settlement in Robertson county, 
Tennessee. Warren Payne was one of the patriots of the War of 1812 
and was the father of Perry Payne (1817-1889). The latter was a 
farmer for some years and also gave public duty as county register 
for three terms; he later entered the mercantile business in Springfield 
in company with Milton Green, and was engaged in that vocation up to 
the time of his death. He and his wife, the above-mentioned Susan 
Darden Payne (1828-1873) were among the best-known and highly 
respected people of the county. She was a member of the Cumber- 
land Presbyterian church and he of the Primitive Baptist, but in later 
years he attended the former church with his wife. Perry Payne was 
known as a successful man, for he had great ability and the work of his 
hands prospered. But his was a heart too generous for a self-seeking 
world ; never, it is said, did he ever turn a deaf ear to any request for 
charitable assistance, and such requests, repeatedly granted, resulted 
in the dissolving of his pecuniary resources. Bereft of fortune though 
he was, he died rich in affection. 

Of the four children bom to Perry and Susan Payne, two besides 
our subject are still living. George W. Payne, bom in 1851, now lives 
in Nashville. Thomas H. Payne, born in 1854, is a resident of Oregon. 
D. A. Payne, to whom this brief review is dedicated, first saw the light 
of day on November 18, 1855, in Springfield, Robertson county, Ten- 
nessee. 

After gleaning a useful sum of knowledge from the public schools 
of this locality, young D. A. Payne began life in a self-supporting capac- 
ity as a clerk and salesman in his father's mercantile establishment. 
After a time he became interested in the railway postal service and 
after successfully passing the government examinations he acted in the 
capacity of a mail clerk for five years. Mr. Payne showed remarkable 
ability in this exacting work, earning the distinction of being called 
one of the best clerks in the fifth division of the postoffice department, 
only two others in his division being considered his equals in the swift 
and accurate performance of duty. After a time Mr. Payne entered 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1307 

another line of traveling activities, one for which his mercantile experi- 
ence and his years of traveling gave him peculiar fitness; this was the 
occupation of a traveling salesman, in which work he also secured 
gratifying results. This, too, was a temporary vocation for D. A. 
Payne, who resigned that itinerant service in 1894 in order to take up 
a line of business permitting a more definitely localized residence. 

In the year named, Mr. Payne entered — ^as the pioneer of this com- 
munity in that business — the work of a real estate agent. He has 
combined with it the activities of an insurance underwriter and has 
formed a partnership with H. H. Mason. Mr. Payne conducts a large 
amount of business both in Tennessee and in Kentucky and his labors 
meet with most favorable results. 

As a citizen of Springfield Mr. Payne is both prominent and highly 
esteemed. Like his father and his uncle, George W. Darden, he holds 
a distinguished place in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, having 
passed all chairs and being incumbent of the office of treasurer, which 
he has held for many years. Politically he is an independent Democrat 
and takes a very deep and active interest in civic affairs, in both local 
and national movemente. He and his family are connected with the 
Presbyterian church, U. S. A. 

Mrs. Payne, as Miss Emma Funk, was in her girlhood well known 
in Lebanon and Danville, Kentucky, where her father, Madison Funk, 
was prominent as a landholder. Her marriage to Mr. Payne was sol- 
emnized on November 18, 1903, and during the ensuing years they have 
become the parents of two children, Hattie S. Payne and Madison P. 
Payne, both of whom are still at home. Mrs. Payne holds an imprtant 
place in Springfield's social life, especially in those phases of it that 
are ethically purposive along lines of public welfare. She has for many 
years been the president of the local organization of the Woman's Chris- 
tian Temperance Union, which office she still ably fills. 

Edward L. Anderson. A banker, tobacco manufacturer and one of 
the leading business men of Gallatin, Mr. Anderson is now foremost 
in infiuence and position in the affairs of Sumner county. However, 
he began his career as a poor boy, educating himself, and the success 
he has won and the influence he has acquired have all been the result of 
a notable career of self -achievement. 

Edward L. Anderson, who represents one of the old families of Ten- 
nessee, was born at Livingston, Overton county, Tennessee, December 
30, 1879. His parents were Byrd and Geneva (Draper) Anderson. The 
paternal great-grandparents were Caleb Anderson and wife, who were 
early settlers of Jackson county. Edward B. Draper, the maternal 
grandfather, was also an early settler in the same county, where he 
lived and died, being an extensive farmer and the owner of a number 



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1308 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

of slaves. He also had a tannery and made shoes. The results of the 
war broke him up in business. 

The founder of the Anderson family in Tennessee was the great- 
grandfather of the Anderson now in business at Gallatin. He was 
Caleb Anderson, who came from Virginia to Jackson county, Tennes- 
see, at a time when most of the country was still public domain, and he 
took up a large quantity of land, including some splendid water power. 
The water power was developed for the operation of a mill, which this 
pioneer settler erected on his land. The land and mill property which 
this pioneer established in Tennessee were passed on to his descendants, 
and the land is still held in the name of members of the Anderson 
family, while the mill is being conducted by one of his grandsons. 

William Carroll Anderson, the grandfather, was born in Jackson 
county, Tennessee, where he spent all his life as a prosperous farmer 
and miller, being connected with the business which had been estab- 
lished by his father. During the Civil war, when he was in his old 
age, some soldiers from the Union army captured him and compelled 
him to ride a horse bareback to Gallatin. This was an experience which 
almost killed him, and he never entirely recovered from the eflEects of 
that ride. One of his sons, named John, was a soldier of the war and 
was killed at Fisher Creek. 

Byrd Anderson, father of the Gallatin business man, was born in 
Jackson county in 1851, and is now a resident of Sumner county. 
Farming has been his occupation throughout practically all his life. 
His wife, Geneva (Draper) Anderson, was born in Overton county in 
1856. Of the six living children, Edward L., is the oldest. The father 
is a Democrat. He is a member of the Methodist church, while the 
mother is a member of the Christian church. 

Reared on the home farm, Edward L. Anderson was educated prin- 
cipally in Burritt College at Spencer, Tennessee, where he graduated 
in 1897. This education was the result of monpy which he had him- 
self earned. For a number of years he has been connected with the 
manufacturing of tobacco, and this has in fact been his principal busi- 
ness ever since he was a boy. He has a large factory at Gallatin, and 
has made it the source of a very prosperous income. 

Mr. Anderson has for three years been superintendent of the Elec- 
tric Light & Water Company at Gallatin. He is vice-president of the 
Sumner County Bank & Trust Company, and is a director and stock- 
liolder in the First National Bank. He also has interests in farming, 
and is one of the most substantial men in business circles of his home 
city. 

In 1905 he married Miss Jamie P. Anderson, a daughter of James 
Anderson, who for a number of years was judge of the county court of 
Sumner county and a prominent man in local affairs. The two chil- 
dren of their marriage are : Walter L., and Edward L., Jr. Mr. Anderson 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1309 

and his family are members of the Christian church. In politics he is 
an independent Democrat, and has served as an alderman of Gallatin. 

William G. Schamberger. The successful career of William G. 
Sehamberger, one of the prominent financiers and business men of 
Sumner county, Tennessee, affords added proof that opportunity exists 
in the older as well as in the newer sections of our country and that 
opportunity is as much a matter of character as of favorable conditions 
in the outside world. The direct descendant of German forebears, 
he has exhibited to a strong degree those traits of thrift, industry and 
energetic endeavor universally accredited to the German people, and 
he knows how to make money make more money, which is the secret of 
wealth. 

William Q. Schamberger was born in Vanderburgh county, Indiana, 
December 6, 1859, a son of John G. and Helena B. Schamberger, both 
natives of Germany and now deceased. The father came to America 
when a young man and was married to Helena B. Schwab, then Mrs. 
Schroeder, a widow, near Evansville, Indiana. He was a carpenter by 
trade and did considerable carpentering at Princeton, Indiana, finally 
moving to Spencer county, that state, and from there to Mount Ver- 
non, Indiana, where he engaged in the mercantile business for a num- 
ber of years. Then in 1873 he changed his location to Gallatin, Tennes- 
see, where he purchased a small farm and continued to operate it until 
his death, at which time he was also in the coal business at Gallatin. 
Of the three children of these parents, two are now living : William G. 
of this review, and Dora, now Mrs. W. Winn, of Sumner county, Ten- 
nessee. Both parents were brought up in the Lutheran faith but became 
identified with the Methodist Episcopal church, South, after their 
removal to Tennessee. The father was a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and in political views. was a Democrat, serving 
at one time as alderman of Mount Vernon, Indiana. 

William G. spent his earlier youth in Indiana and began his educa- 
tional training in the city schools of Mount Vernon, that state, com- 
pleting it in the country schools of Sumner county, Tennessee. He 
began business life as the proprietor of a store in Gallatin and con- 
tinued thus identified nearly fourteen years, being also engaged in the 
milling business a little more than eight years and being quite suc- 
cessful in both lines of business activity. In 1905 he organized the 
Sumner County Bank and Trust Company, of which he became presi- 
dent and has since officiated "in that station. This institution is capi- 
talized at $25,000, has average deposits of $100,000, and has taken 
a place among the prosperous financial institutions of the county. The 
same year, 1905, Mr. Schamberger also entered the real estate and loan 
business and in this line also he has been very successful, operating 
mostly on a commission basis. His personal holdings include a fine 



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1310 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

farm of 550 acres in Sumner county, the entire east side of the public 
square (with the exception of one store building) of Gallatin, besides 
considerable other valuable city realty. He started with but little 
money, but he had business acumen of a high order and was endowed 
with that faculty of indomitable will and energy which conquers all 
things. From the foregoing lines it will be seen that he is not of the 
standstill class of men, but is a man of push and energy who not only 
advances his own material interests but thereby promotes the pros- 
perity and advancement of his town and county as well, which, in turn, 
adds to the commercial prestige of the whole commonwealth of Ten- 
nessee. 

On September 5, 1882, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Scham- 
berger and Miss Mary "W. Harrison. She is a daughter of Dr. J. W. 
Harrison, a native of Sumner county, Tennessee, and a well-known 
country physician here for many years, whose people were among the 
earliest settlers in Sumner county. The three children bom to Mr. and 
Mrs. Schamberger are: Freddie M., who married Emmett McCuUock, 
now secretary of a large saddlery company at Nashville, Tennessee; 
Harrold L., with Anderson & Company at Gallatin, Tennessee; and 
Helena, now a student in school. 

Mr. Schamberger is an adherent of the Democratic party in political 
views. Deeply interested in community affairs, he has given hearty 
co-operation to many movements for the general good, and has served 
as mayor of Gallatin two years and as an alderman twenty years. Both 
he and his wife are valued members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
South, and Mr. Schamberger is affiliated fraternally with the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, of which latter 
order he is a past chancellor commander. He always delights in doing 
for the good of Gallatin what to some seems impossible, as he has been 
tested by his raising money for schools, seminaries, etc. 

James M. Venters, M. D. The medical profession of Sumner 
county is represented by some of the most skilled and learned men of 
this calling to be found in the state, who have devoted themselves, their 
time, their energies and their lives to the preservation of public health 
and the alleviation of human ills. Theirs is no easy task, nor is it 
always remunerated as befits their high standing and undoubted great 
work, and yet they cheerfully accept the disadvantages, content in the 
knowledge of useful careers. The training of the modem physician is 
remarkably rigid and embraces not only a college course, but extended 
subsequent study, the constant changes and developments in the pro- 
fession demanding the practitioner's closest attention, while the coun- 
try physician has the added labor of covering a wide territory, always 
being compelled to hold himself in readiness to answer a call, irre- 
spective of time or weather. One of the representative physicians of 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1311 

Sumner county, whose devotion to duty, professional skill and kindly 
sympathy has won him a high place in the esteem of the people of his 
community is James M. Venters, M. D., of Portland, a man fitted by 
nature and training for his honored calling. Dr. Venters is a native 
of southwestern Virginia, and was born February 5, 1873, a son of G. 
M. and Ehoda (Branham) Venters. 

John Venters, the paternal great-grandfather of Dr. Venters, was a 
native of England, from which country he emigrated to the United 
States, settling first in South Carolina and subsequently removing to 
Virginia, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until his 
death. His son, James Venters, was bom in Virginia and was a suc- 
cessful farmer, but late in life met with financial reverses. He served as 
a soldier during the war between the states and is now making his home 
in Kentucky, being eighty-seven years of age. On the maternal side. 
Dr. Venters' grandfather was Martin Branham, a native of what is 
now "West Virginia, whose people came from South Carolina. As a 
young man he moved to Virginia, there taking up four thousand acres 
of land from the government, and this property he left to his estate at 
the time of his death. G. M. Venters, father of the doctor, was bom in 
1846, in Virginia, and in 1884 accompanied his parents to Kentucky, 
where he located in farming. He also followed horse trading, buying 
as many as five hundred animals at a time and taking them to Georgia, 
and this business he continued to follow until his death, which occurred 
in 1895. He was married to Rhoda Branham, who was bom in 1848, 
and she died in 1882, having been the mother of seven children, of 
whom six are now living, Dr. Venters being the third in order of 
birth. The mother was a member of the Baptist church, and Mr. 
Venters was a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity. 

James M. Venters received his early education in the public schools, 
following which he attended Lexington State College, where he remained 
two years. He next was a student in Hospital College of Medicine, of 
Louisville, which he attended from 1901 to 1904, in the latter year 
being graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Following this 
he was engaged in practice for two years in southeastern Kentucky, but 
in 1906 came to Portland and established himself in a country prac- 
tice, now having a large and representative clientele. In addition to 
the onerous duties of a large practice, Dr. Venters also manages his 
175-acre farm, which is in an excellent state of cultivation, and on which 
he raises tobacco, wheat, corn and hay. He is well-deserving of the title 
of self-made man, having started out in life on his own account at the 
tender age of ten years, since which time he has received no financial 
help whatever. His sturdy independence, tireless industry and com- 
mendable ambition have gained him the respect of all who know him, 
and Sumner county has no more popular young professional man. 
Fraternally, the doctor is aflBliated with the I. 0. 0. F. and the Loyal 



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1312 TENxNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Order of Moose. He is a member of the Sumner County Medical Soci- 
ety, the Tennessee Medical Society and the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, and takes an active interest in the work of these organizations^ 
and his political proclivities cause him to support the principles and 
candidates of the Democratic party. 

William Polk Moore, Jr., M. D. Thirty years devoted to the prac- 
tice of his profession is the record of Dr. W. P. Moore, Jr., of Portland, 
Tennessee, thirty years of faithful service in the alleviation of the ills of 
his fellow men. During this time he has risen to an enviable position 
among the medical men of his state, but his energies have not been 
confined to the duties of his calling, for he has been engaged success- 
fully also in various lines of business, and has shown equal skill along 
commercial lines. A striking example of the benefits to be gained 
through the practice of constant industry, integrity and sobriety, he 
has been the architect of his own fortunes, and a record of his career 
will be read with interest by those who appreciate self-made man- 
hood. 

William P. Moore was born in Sumner county, Tennessee, June 15, 
1857, and is a son of Dr. W. P. and Amanda (Dickey) Moore. He lost 
his mother when he was still a child, but was given a good training in 
his youth, and his early education was secured in the Portland public 
schools. Subsequently he entered Vanderbilt Medical College, from 
which famous institution he was graduated in 1882, and the follow- 
ing year received his degree from the University of Nashville. Immedi- 
ately after completing his studies he entered upon the practice of his 
profession in Portland, where he has since continued, and he is at this 
time one of the best known and most highly valued physicians in this 
part of the state. Dr. Moore entered upon professional life with but 
little capital, and his earlier years were attended by many trying strug- 
gles, but perseverance, a love for his chosen calling and inherent ability 
eventually brought recognition and appreciation and the financial 
emoluments that go therewith. In the field of business he has likewise 
succeeded, being the proprietor of a large dry-goods, ladies' furnishings 
and millinery establishment, located in his own building, in addition to 
which he is the owner of another business building and a well-cultivated 
farm. As the proprietor of a tobacco business, he is the only inde- 
pendent dealer in Portland. 

On June 22, 1890, Dr. Moore was united in marriage with Miss Ella 
Goostree, daughter of Watson W. and Fannie (Gimlin) Goostree, the 
former a native of Tennessee and the latter of Kentucky. Mr. Goos- 
tree was for some years a farmer, but in his later years entered the 
mercantile field. Dr. and Mrs. Moore have one daughter: Belle, who 
married, June 22, 1910, J. B. Derryberry, who is engaged in a gen- 
eral merchandise business in Portland. Mr. and Mrs. Derryberry have 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1313 

a little boy, William Spur Derryberry, born March 28, 1911. The 
family is connected with the Church of Christ, and in political mat- 
ters Dr. Moore is a Democrat, but takes only a good citizen *s interest 
in affairs of a public nature. His life has been an active and useful 
one, and his connection with various movements of a progressive nature 
have aided materially in advancing the interests of Portland. 

Pat W. Kerr. There is no more urgent problem in America today 
than the problem of educational reform. The success of the demo- 
cratic experiment, the preservation of our free institutions, is depend- 
ent primarily upon its successful solution. Vocational education and 
citizenship training must be developed. Besides these broad considera- 
tions are new problems, those of health regulation and the social care 
of backward children, the development of schools as civic and social 
centers — ^problems of the most practical kind. To this work some of 
the most earnest and public-spirited citizens of Tennessee are today 
devoting their energies, and prominent in this class stands Pat W. 
Kerr, superintendent of schools of Portland, and a man whose whole 
active career has been spent in educational work. Mr. Kerr was born 
January 2, 1879, in Trousdale county, Tennessee, and is a son of Joe 
M. and Martha A. (Carey) Kerr. 

Levi E. Kerr, the paternal grandfather of Pat W. Kerr, was born 
in Tennessee, whence his parents had come from North Carolina, at 
an early date. They settled on a farm in White county, and there spent 
the remainder of their lives,. Levi E. inheriting their property and 
adding thereto, and also being a tiller of the soil throughout his career. 
John G. Carey, the maternal grandfather of Mr. Kerr, spent his life 
in farming in Trousdale county, and there djed advanced in years and 
with a handsome competence. Joe M. Kerr was born in White county, 
Tennessee, in 1848, was there educated in the district schools, and 
remained in his native neighborhood until reaching the age of eighteen 
years. At that time he removed to Trousdale county, where he was 
married in 1868 to Martha A. Carey, who was born in this county in 
1852, and they had a family of four children, Pat W. being the third 
in order of birth. Some time after his marriage Mr. Kerr went back 
to White county, but eventually returned to Trousdale county, where 
his death occurred in 1896, his widow surviving until 1911. They 
were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in political mat- 
ters Mr. Kerr was a Democrat. 

Pat W. Kerr received his education in the Masonic Institute at 
Hartsville, and in 1895 began his career as an educator, teaching public 
school for one year. The next two or three years were passed in farm 
labor, when he again took up teaching, and has so continued to the 
present time, gaining success and popularity in his chosen calling. He 
taught White Sulphur Springs school at Rome, Tennessee, where he 



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1314 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

remained four years, and was also at D. A. Duke College, at Difficult, 
Tennessee, and after two years came to Portland, where in 1907 he 
took charge of the high school. Since then he has acted in the capacity 
of superintendent of schools, and his administration has been featured 
by numerous innovations and much needed reforms. Mr. Kerr has 
given his office conscientious service, and his ability in his profession 
has never been questioned. A scholarly man and deep thinker, he is an 
omnivorous reader and is well informed on all live issues of the day. 

In 1904 Mr. Kerr was married to Miss Lydia Lipscomb, daughter 
of John E. Lipscomb, living at Hartsville, Trousdale county, success- 
ful farming people. Two children have been bom to this union: 
Gladys L. and Harold, both being deceased. Mrs. Kerr is a member 
of the Christian church and her husband of the Methodist Episcopal 
denomination. He is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, 
in which he has held the chair of advisor, but the greater part of his 
time is devoted to educational work, and he is a valued member of the 
Middle Tennessee Educators Association. In politics he is a Democrat 
Mr. Kerr also has some farming interests, and is a stockholder of the 
Farmers Bank of Portland and a member of the directing board of 
that institution. 

Edgar F. Peden, M. D. Bringing to his practice thorough scho- 
lastic training, innate soundness and accuracy of judgment, and a cheer- 
ful disposition, Dr. E. F. Peden has maintained a high position among 
the disciples of -^sculapius in Tennessee. The greater part of his 
professional life has been spent in Portland, where since 1904 he has 
ministered to the sick and built up a large and representative prac- 
tice, and he has also been successful along commercial lines, owning 
a flourishing drug business and being part owner in a large business 
block. Dr. Peden bears the added distinction of being a native son of 
Tennessee, having been bom in Sumner county, August 4, 1872. His 
paternal grandfather, Hosie Peden, was born in Virginia and accom- 
panied his parents to Tennessee as a lad, passing the remainder of his 
life here in agricultural pursuits. On the maternal side, Dr. Peden 's 
grandfather was also a Virginian, but was reared in Kentucky, where 
he became a successful farmer and merchant. J. W. Peden, father of 
the doctor, was bom in 1838, in Sumner county, Tennessee, and as a 
young man enlisted in the Thirtieth Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, 
in the Confederate service, fighting with that organization until his 
capture by the Union troops. At that time he was confined at Fort 
Donelson, and continued to remain a prisoner for ten months. On 
receiving his honorable discharge, he returned to the duties of peace, 
taking up his residence on the old home farm, where he still resides, 
and which he owns. He has developed a handsome, valuable property, 
and is considered one of the substantial men of his community. In 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1315 

politics he is a Democrat, and his religious belief is that of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. He was married to Mary Anderson, who was 
born in Scottsville, Kentucky, in 1843, and she died in October, 1911, 
having been the mother of two children : W. H., who makes his home 
with his father on the old homestead ; and Dr. E. F. 

E. F. Peden received his early education in the public schools of 
Sumner county, following which he became a student in the Portland 
high school. In 1896 he entered the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of Nashville, where he was graduated in May, 1899, with his 
degree, and first settled himself in practice at Mitchellville, Tennessee. 
Dr. Peden came to Portland in 1904, and here he has continued to reside 
to the present time. He has an excellent practice, drawn to him by his 
undoubted ability, his deep sympathy and his kindness of heart, and 
holds a high place in the esteem of his fellow practitioners. Not long 
after establishing himself in Portland, Dr. Peden opened a pharmacy, 
which he has continued to maintain, and in partnership with Dr. W. P. 
Moore is the owner of a business block. 

Dr. Peden was married in 1901 to Lena Wright, daughter of G. T. 
Wright, a retired farmer of Portland. Dr. Peden is a valued member 
of the Odd Fellows and the Masons, and in his political proclivities is 
an independent Democrat. His religious convictions make him a Bap- 
tist, while his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
South, and both have numerous friends in religious and social circles 
of the city. 

James 0. GAMsniL. One of Saundersville's successful men in the 
mercantile business is J. 0. Gambill, who has displayed his business abil- 
ity both in the management of his store and in the operation of his 
farm. Bom in Robertson county, August 9, 1859, he is the only son 
of B. P. and Caroline (Brewer) Gambill. . 

The settlement of Mr. Gambill 's ancestors in Robertson county 
dates back to the time of his grandparents, Benjamin Gambill and John 
M. Brewer, pioneers in the county and very well known and prosperous 
men of their time, the former being a farmer, also engaged in the mill- 
ing business and for years a magistrate, and the latter the owner of 
many slaves and a believer in the Union, in the army of which he had 
one son in service. 

Mercantile pursuits for years claimed the time and attention of the 
father of J. 0. Gambill, he being successfully engaged in business at 
Erin, Tennessee, where he is one of the leading citizens. He belongs 
to the Methodist Episcopal church, South, and is a Democrat in politics. 
He was bom in Robertson county ; his wife was born in Sumner county. 

After his boyhood days in school were spent, J. 0. Gambill began 
life in the milling business and was thus engaged until he received a 



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1316 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

position as clerk in a store. Subsequently he became railroad agent 
at Erin, in which capacity he was engaged for twelve years. The fol- 
lowing ten years were spent in the mercantile business at Erin, and in 
1901 came to Sumner county where he farmed for ten years. April 1, 
1911, he opened up the general store at Saundersville, where he is at 
present located and where he is doing a prosperous business. 

The union of Mr. Gambill and Susan Gray, to whom he was mar- 
ried in 1893, has resulted in three children : William 0., Houston, who 
attends high school at Gallatin, and Walton, five years old. Mrs. Gam- 
biirs father, long one of Sumner county's leading farmers and highly 
respected men, lives at Gallatin. 

In his political views, Mr. Gambill is a Democrat, and fraternally 
he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, being past chancellor com- 
mander. He is one of Saundersville 's foremost citizens, having been 
postmaster since January, 1912. He carries a nice stock of merchandise 
in his store and is the owner of a large farm. 

Throughout the career of Mr. Gambill, both in his mercantile and 
agricultural pursuits, have been evident the persevering endeavors and 
the industriousness and activity which have crowned his efforts with 
success and brought him to the forefront among his fellowmen. 

John C. Revell. The above-named gentleman is one of the well 
known and much respected planters of Obion county, where he has 
extensive property; and one of the prominent citizens of the thirving 
little city of Obion, where he maintains his residence, one of the sev- 
eral fine houses which he possesses here. 

Tennessee has been Mr. Revell 's home since 1834 and Obion county 
for about forty-seven years. His birthplace was in North Carolina, 
where his parents spent a large portion of their lives. They were 
Axim Revell and Martha (Norvill) Revell and were the parents of 
ten children, of whom the sixth in line was J. C. Revell, the subject of 
this biographical review. The date of his birth was March 16, 1828. 

As a boy, Mr. Revell 's first interest in Tennessee began when in 
1834 his parents removed from North Carolina to the part of Tennes- 
see which was then known as Hayward county. He early turned his 
attention to agricultural pursuits and in this pursuit he has succeeded 
beyond his most sanguine expectations. 

In 1852 Mr. Revell was united in marriage with Miss Mary Jones, 
of Crockett. With the passing of the years their home was brightened 
by the coming of seven children, of whom three are yet living. They are 
Mrs. Odela Cunningham of Obion; Mr. Guy Revell, a farmer of this 
county, district 14, and Mr. Milton Revell, also a farmer of district 14. 

The second marriage of J. C. Revell took place in 1903, at which 
time he was united to Mrs. Mary Allsadine (Fairleigh) Seabolt. The 
Church of the Disciples, or Christian Church, is that of the religious 



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JOHN C. REVELL 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1317 

afl&liation of Mr. Revell and his family. He has long been associated 
with leading fraternal societies, having belonged to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows since the year 1854, and being also prominently 
connected with the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons since 1867. 

Mr. Reveirs agricultural property consist of nearly four hundred 
acres of fertile land. Three hundred acres of this is now under cul- 
tivation, its chief grain product being corn. Pastures for the feed- 
ing of stock also comprise a part of its extent. Mr. Revell i& an expe- 
rienced planter and his farming operations also have the advantage 
of being conducted by means of the best machinery of modem and 
most approved construction. Not only is J. C. Revell very successful 
as an agriculturist, but also is he held in high personal esteem by all 
who know him. He is now probably the oldest citizen in the village 
of Obion. Being a cripple, he could not serve in the war, but his 
sympathies were with the South. He would never accept oflSce and is 
still active and hale and hearty. 

Charles Andrew Derryberry. In this era of the practical, educa- 
tion is keenly alive to the need for the purposive; and *' vocational 
training" is the watchcry of the majority of educators, as well as of 
those parents who would anticipate lives of definite usefulness for their 
children. America is one of the most businesslike of nations and her 
commercial leaders are demanding an ever better preparation of those 
who would enter the arena of business life. In lieu of this need, much 
credit is due the men who conduct and supervise institutions for thor- 
ough training in both educational foundations and the practical super- 
structure of business courses. 

Among these we note Charles Andrew Derryberry, who is person- 
ally responsible for the present School of Business in Jackson, the first 
institution of its kind ever organized in this place. Of its originator 
and head, not only professional data, but also genealogical and bio- 
graphical information of a personal kind will be of interest. 

In Uptonville, Madison county, Tennessee, Charles A. Derryberry 
was bom on May 9, 1870. His parents were William Jordan Derry- 
berry and Narcissa Weathers Derryberry. On the parental farm which 
was his birthplace and his father's lifetime residence, Charles Derry- 
berry spent his juvenile days, attending the rural schools of his vicin- 
ity. From these he passed to the high schools of Hayward county. On 
completing this period of his education, he entered professional life, 
deferring special and more advanced courses until a later time. 

The schools of Madison county were the first field for Mr. Derry- 
berry 's activities as a teacher. After his service in that region, he fol- 
lowed the same line of work in Henry county. Having thus served 
his own state for a goodly term of years, he then accepted positions in 



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1318 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

the high schools of Graves county, Kentucky. Altogether his period 
of public school teaching continued until 1901. 

In the year mentioned Mr. Derryberry became a student in the 
Southwestern Baptist University in Jackson, where he carried fuU 
courses for two years. At the end of that time he waa tendered, in 
recognition of his proficiency and his pedagogical acumen, the position 
of principal of the Stenographic Department in this same institution. 
In 1905 the university authorities deemed it best to confine the college 
curricula to classical, literary and scientific lines, leaving the commer- 
cial training to independent outside enterprises. This gave Professor 
Derryberry an excellent opportunity to further define his own work 
along individual lines. 

He therefore established the Jackson School of Business in that 
same, year of 1905. This was the first school of business ever estab- 
lished in the city of Jackson. It has flourished in gratifying degree and 
still continues its important work, with Mr. Derryberry as its head. 

Professor Derryberry has become identified with many of the promi- 
nent movements of Jackson. He has numerous fraternal associations, 
including the following: The Free and Accepted Masons, Lodge 45; 
the Knights of Pythias, Lancelot Lodge 13, of which he is a past chan- 
cellor; and the Woodmen of the World, in Lodge 469. He is an intel- 
ligent political thinker, adhering to the main doctrines of the Demo- 
cratic party. The religious connections of the Derryberry family are 
with the Baptist church. 

The home of Charles Andrew Derryberry was established in 1892, 
on which date he was united in marriage to Miss Pearl Birge Graves, of 
Grundy Center, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Derryberry are the parents of 
two children, named Voris Graves and Flo. S. Derryberry. The family 
is one of both intellectual and social importance in Jackson. 

James Dale McMurry. Among the younger attorneys of Trous- 
dale county, Tennessee, the subject of this review occupies a command- 
ing position. He is a lawyer to the manor bom, his father, John S. 
McMurry, having been a prominent and successful attorney of Harts- 
ville for nearly half a century. John S. McMurry was bom in Trousdale 
county in 1843, and continued to reside in that county all his life. He 
married Miss Caroline Duncan McLain, daughter of Dr. Jesse McLain, 
a native of Tennessee, where he practiced medicine for many years and 
died in the city of Nashville at the age of eighty years. John S. Mc- 
Murry read law with Judge Andrew McLain, his wife's uncle, and in 
1865 was admitted to the bar. From that time untilhis death on April 
23, 1909, he practiced his profession in Hartsville, a fine example of the 
old school lawyer, courteous and dignified, but persistent and ener- 
getic in protecting the interests of his clients. He enjoyed a lucrative 
practice, but through his liberality gave away a large portion of his 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1319 

income, and never accumulated much of an estate. He was a Demo- 
crat in his politics and was an active participant in political campaigns 
in behalf of that party. In 1905 he was elected to the state senate and 
served one term in that body, where he made a record of which his 
constituents might justly feel proud. His fraternal relations were with 
the Masonic fraternity. His father, Charles McMurry, was bom in 
Tennessee while that state was a part of North Carolina and lived there 
all his life as a farmer. He was also a justice of the peace for many 
years and was an influential citizen. Caroline Duncan McMurry was 
bom in Maury county, Tennessee, in 1855, and died in December, 1900. 
She and her husband were the parents of nine children, seven of whom 
are now living. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
a faithful wife and a devoted and loving mother. 

James Dale McMurry, the third child of the family, was bom in 
Trousdale county, Tennessee, April 13, 1873. In his boyhood he 
attended the public schools and in 1897 was graduated at the Harts- 
ville Masonic Institute. He then entered his father's law office as a 
student and prosecuted his studies with such assiduity that in November, 
1898, he was admitted to the bar. Immediately upon his admission he 
began practice in Hartsville, where he has built up a large clientage, 
his practice extending to all the state and Federal courts. The thorough 
training he received under the preceptorship of his father, together with 
his subsequent study and experience, gave him all the essential qualifica- 
tions of the successful lawyer — one who commands alike the respect of 
the bench, bar and general public. Like his father, he is a Democrat, 
and has served as county attorney. 

On January 1, 1899, Mr. McMurray married Miss Laura Puryear, 
daughter of William L. Puryear, a native of Trousdale county, where he 
was a wealthy and successful farmer. To this iinion have been born four 
children — three sons and a daughter. John P. and Jesse S. are attend- 
ing school, and Cecil P. and Elizabeth are at home. Mrs. McMurry is a 
Baptist in her religious faith, and her husbnd is a member of the 
Presbyterian church. 

FiNiiEY Marborough Dorris is a fine representative of the active and 
substantial citizens of Nashville. He is a partner of George A. Karsch 
and is one of the leading undertakers in the city, and being thoroughly 
skilled in all branches of his profession, his services are much sought in 
this community. 

A son of Rev. William 6. and Elzira (Ruth) Dorris, he was born in 
Clarksville, Tennessee, February 15, 1863. The family in 1865 moved 
to Sumner county, Tennessee, where Finley M. Dorris was educated, 
principally under the tutelage of Prof. C. B. Tate, a noted educator of 
Virginia. In 1880, at the age of seventeen years, he entered the employ- 
ment of his uncle, William R. Cornelius, an undertaker of Nashville, 



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1320 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

and during the twenty-two years that he was associated with him he 
became familiar with the details of all branches of the profession. In 
1902 Mr. Dorris engaged in business in Nashville on his own account, 
continuing alone until 1907 when he formed a partnership with George 
A. Karsch. In 1911 these gentlemen, who have met with eminent success 
in their work, erected their present establishment, which is considered 
by many as being the most beautiful and well adapted of its kind any- 
where to be found. 

Mr. Dorris is a member of various fraternal and social organizations. 
He belongs to the Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons, in which 
he has taken the 32nd degree, and is also a Shriner. For twenty-nine 
years he has been a member of the Knights of Pythias. He is also a 
member of the Country Club and the local Board of Trade ; a member 
of McKendree Church, and has been an oflBcial in the I^Iethodist church 
for more than twenty-five years. In 1912 he was asked to become a 
candidate for member of the County Court, and out of the sixty odd 
candidates he led the field without having a card printed or asking a 
man for his vote. 

Mr. Dorris was married January 7, 1885, to Miss Mattie Carter, (who 
was born at Greenhill, Tennessee,) a daughter of Charles and Elizabeth 
(Stevenson) Carter, natives of this state. Two children have been born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Dorris: Finley Carter and Frances Elizabeth, who is 
now one of the young schoolgirl set. On March 13, 1912, Carter Dorris 
married Miss Margaret Barnett of Pikeville, Tennessee, a daughter of 
Dr. James and Gertrude (Rankin) Barnett. To them one child has been 
bom: MaiTgaret Dorris. 

The Dorris Family — In tracing the origin of the Dorris family, we 
find that the name ** Dorris'* is a Greek name. It was first spelled Doris, 
and we have been able to trace it back to the Greek city of Doris. In 
this city the first Doric column was built, and was built by one of the 
Doris family. It was first called the Doris column, and afterwards 
changed to the Doric column. We also find that Hellenus gave the 
name of Hellenes to the Greeks, and that he had three sons. The second 
son was Dorus. The country that Dorus inherited was named by him 
' ' Doris, ' * and from this country came the family name * ' Dorris. ' ' (Hol- 
lins* Ancient History.) 

In the Roman Army under Julius Caesar fought a Greek general by 
name of General Josef Dorris. After the conquest of Great Britain he 
was awarded by Caesar the county of Downs, Ireland, for meritorious 
service rendered. This was about the years 54 and 55 B. C. (Caesar's 
Commentaries.) 

Josef Dorris, a lineal descendant of Gen. Josef Dorris, and a native 
of the County of Do^vtis, Ireland, had nine sons, seven of which emigrated 
to America in the early part of 1700, locating first near Baltimore, Mary- 
land. After a short period, William, Isaac and John went to Amhurst 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1321 

county, Virginia, and located. While here William married, and a son 
from this marriage by name of Josef Dorris migrated to Mecklenburg, 
North Carolina, and became a noted Baptist minister. He married Cyn- 
thia Irwin, and from this union there were two sons, John Irwin and 
Thomas. After her death, he married Mary Williams and by her had 
ten sons and three daughters, among whom were : George P., Stephen, 
Isaac, William, RoUand, etc. Several of these sons were with General 
Francis Marion, who led the North Carolina forces in the Revolutionary 
war, and made efficient soldiers. 

William and Isaac married two sisters by name of Frost from Frost- 
burg, Maryland. The Frost family being a prominent family, the town 
was named for their father, who owned a body of land on which was 
discovered one of the first coal mines in America. 

William, Isaac, and their half brother, John Irwin, came South pros- 
pecting, and while on the trip they met with Peter Demombreun; 
together with him they came on his keelboat down the Holston river to 
the Tennessee river and down the Tennessee river on to the village of 
Nashville. Peter Demombreun afterwards located in Nashville, and 
William, Isaac and John went to Fort Hamilton, now known as Tyree 
Springs. After locating at Fort Hamilton, William and Isaac went back 
for their families in Maryland, returning by wagon to Fort Hamilton, 
where they secured land and settled. Later on came their brothers — 
Stephen, who became the chaplain in General Jackson's army at New 
Orleans ; George P., who went to St. Louis, and Roland, who located in 
Sumner county. 

John Irwin married Elizabeth Menees near Springfield, Tennessee, 
and had one son and two daughters: Thfi son. Dr. William Dawson 
Dorris of Nashville, a noted physician in his day, and one of the first to 
advocate the germ theory when the cholera was so bad in Nashville 
in 1869. 

William Dorris married Katherine Frost, and from this union there 
were two sons and six daughters : Samuel Frost, Betsy, Rebecca, Kate, 
William D., Tobitha, Drusilla and Levina. Samuel Frost, Betsy, Rebecca 
and Kate were bom in Baltimore, Maryland, before the family moved 
and located at Fort Hamilton. After locating at that place William D., 
Tobitha, Drusilla and Levina were born. Samuel Frost married Susanna 
Pitt of Cottontown, Tennessee. Betsy Dorris married John Hudson. 
Rebecca married Samuel Hendricks. Kate married Drew Edwards. 
William D. married and went to Illinois to live; his wife's namf» is 
unknown to the writer. Tobitha married John P. Hendricks. Drusilla 
married James Hendricks. Levina married Pleasant Mays. 

After Samuel Frost Dorris and Susanna Pitt married they moved 
near Fountain Head, Tennessee, on Stroughters branch, and here made 
their home for many years. From this union there were eight sons and 
four daughters: Henry, William Gibbs, Jeremiah, James, Isaac G.^ 



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1322 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Daniel W., Benjamin F., George B., Katherine, Zilpha, Susan and Mar- 
tha. Katherine Dorris married Richard Shaflfer. Zilpha married John 
Calvin Shivers. Susan married Robert Ruth. Martha married William 
R. Cornelius. 

Samuel Frost Dorris, father of these children was born in Baltimore, 
Maryland, November 20, 1787, and died at Nashville, Tennessee, October 
16, 1878. Susanna Pitt, mother of these children, was bom in Cotton - 
town, Tennessee, April 23, 1794, and died at Nashville August 24, 1870. 
Samuel Frost Dorris, while living at Fountain Head, Tennessee, wfis 
engaged in transporting goods by teams from Nashville, which was the 
distributing point for all merchandise for miles around, including nearly 
the whole of Tennessee and Southern Kentucky into the interior. Nash- 
ville was then a small hamlet with scant promise of its present size and 
prosperity. Mr. Shelby owned the land lying on the East Side of the 
river, which is now known as **East Nashville." Mr. Dorris had a fine 
saddle horse which Mr. Shelby was so anxious to possess that he offered 
to exchange all of that large tract of land for the animal. In those 
days there was no sale for the land, and as Mr. Dorris had use for the 
horse he refused to trade. Mr. Dorris in 1825 removed from Fountain 
Head, Tennessee, to Nashville, where he spent his closing days, dying 
at the venerable age of ninety-one years, and was laid to rest in the old 
City Cemetery beside his wife, Susanna Pitt. 

The true ** Dorris" type is light hair, blue eyes, fair complexion, a 
mechanical turn of mind, very active and of quiet disposition. 

In tracing the history of the Dorris family from its early beginning 
the writer was not able to find or learn of any one by the name of Dorris 
with but one exception who. ever possessed any great amount of wealth. 
They all seem to be content with living quiet and peaceful lives. 

Rev. William Gibbs Dorris, son of Samuel Frost and Susanna Pitt 
Dorris, and father of Finley M. Dorris, was bom near Fountain Head, 
Tennessee, on Stroughters branch, May 6, 1815. In 1825 the family 
moved to Nashville by wagons, coming over the Nashville and Gallatin 
dirt road, there being no pikes in those days. Arriving at the Cumber- 
land river on the East Side, they had to cross in flat boats. The family 
located on North Front street, just below the site of the old Methodist 
Publishing House. He relates that General LaFayette had just made 
his visit to Nashville by boat up the Cumberland river. 

After moving to Nashville he went to school for a short period, after 
which he for a time served as apprentice to a tailor. In 1832 he went 
to Jackson, Tennessee, engaging in the tinner's business with his brother, 
Henry, and from there he went to Bolivar, Tennessee, and while in 
Bolivar he relates the witnessing of the scene of the falling of the stars, 
which was in 1833. After two years spent at Jackson and Bolivar, 
Tennessee, he went to Huntsville, Alabama, and engaged in cattle trad- 
ing. He did not follow this occupation very long, as it did not suit him, 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1323 

but secured a position in the jewelry house of Thomas Cain. While 
working for him, in the year 1834, he married his daughter, Charlotte, 
and from this union they had two children : Thomas and Sarah. Shortly 
after his marriage he and his brother-in-law, James Cain, went into the 
dry goods business at Decatur, Alabama. They were very successful in 
their business venture, but they concluded to speculate in cotton, which 
broke them up. 

William 6. Dorris had now joined the Masons, and a brother Mason 
and chum of his, Charlie Lane, went into the dry goods business with 
him, and he was again very successful. They continued this business 
until the death of his wife, which occurred in 1846. Charlie Lane often 
told him he had no business behind a counter selling goods, and often 
suggested to him that he would make a good preacher. Neither of these 
young men were members of the church at that time, but a few years 
later they both joined the Methodist church, and both made good and 
useful preachers. Charlie Lane joined the Texas Conference and W. G. 
Dorris the Tennessee Conference in October, 1849, which at that time 
comprised the whole of Middle Tennessee and North Alabama. The 
Conference sent him to hifi( first charge as a Junior Preacher to the Lime 
Stone Circuit, Alabama. Two years later, in October, 1851, he was sent 
to his first station at Shelbyville, Tennessee. While here he met Miss 
Elzira Ruth, daughter of George W. Ruth, a jeweler, whom he married 
on October 27, 1853. Prom this union were bom twelve children, three 
dying in infancy and nine coming to maturity : William Murphy, who 
married Fanny Oden of Rutherford county, Tennessee; George Benja- 
min, who died in infancy; Florence Eugenia, who never married; 
Blanche Gibson, who married Charles W. Bedford of Bourbon county, 
Kentucky; Charles Westley, who died in infancy; Finley Marborough, 
who married Mattie Carter of Nashville, Tennessee; Henry Beaumont, 
who married Nettie Comfort of Warren county, Kentucky; Virgie 
Abston, who died at the age of twenty-three; Martha Summers, who 
married Lindsley Bender of Sumner county, Tennessee; Annie Ruth, 
who married Maudaut Patterson of Robertson county, Tennessee ; Birdie 
Frazier, who died in infancy; Robert Pane, known as Bishop, who mar- 
ried Kate Stroude of Wilson county. 

In October, 1855, William G. Dorris was sent to Murfreesboro, Ten- 
nessee, and in 1857 to McKendree Church. He also served the churches 
of Columbia, Tennessee, Andrew Charge, which is now known as Elm 
Street, and Hobson's Chapel. About this time he bought out the Eclipse 
Foundry and made Eclipse stoves, and had his warehouse at 56 Broad 
Street. For a while he had as a partner a man by name of **Kitch," but 
he soon bought him out and ran it alone until the Civil war came on and 
forced him to give it up. In October, 1861, he was sent to Clarksville, 
Tennessee, remaining there during the Civil war. In 1865 he was sent 
to Columbia, Tennessee. The country at that time was in a torn up con- 



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1324 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

dition and he found it impossible to secure a home for his family, so he 
decided to buy a farm, which he did in Sumner county, near Saunders- 
ville, moving his family on it the latter part of October, 1865. From 
here on he served various charges until 1880, when D. C. Kelly, the 
Station Pastor at Gallatin, Tennessee, concluded to make the race for 
prohibition governor and W. G. Dorris was sent there to fill out his unex- 
pired term. In October, 1880, he was sent as presiding elder to the 
Lebanon District, and in October, 1882, was sent as presiding elder to 
the Murfreesboro District for four years, which concluded his work as 
an active member of the Conference, and he was placed on the super- 
annuated list and retired to his farm, where he lived until his death, 
which occurred on April 8, 1900. 

Of the many thin^ that were written and spoken of him, the follow- 
ing written by his life long friend, Dr. J. D. Barbee, expresses more 
fully from every viewpoint the power, the character and the esteem in 
which he was held by those with .whom he came in contact : 

*' William G. Dorris was born in Kentucky, May 6, 1815, and died 
at his home near Nashville, Tennessee, April 8, 1900. In his early man- 
hood he was a model for the artist, being tall and symmetrically propor- 
tioned, and withal possessing a strikingly handsome face. To a digni- 
fied mien he added an easy, graceful carriage, and a stranger passing 
him on the street would involuntarily turn for a second look and men- 
tally inquire: *Who is it?' A full, round, sonorous voice, with tender, 
persuasive tone, and his benignant eye ever impressed those with whom 
he conversed that he was a man of loving heart and kind spirit. In 
character he was integrity personified. I would at any time have been 
willing to subscribe an unqualified endorsement of him in this regard, 
and that was the general estimate. An incident in his early life illus- 
trates his reputation with those who knew him well. He and another 
young man had formed a copartnership to enter into the dry goods busi- 
ness at Decatur, Alabama, and young Dorris had gone to Philadelphia 
to purchase the first stock of goods for the firm. There he met a friend 
who was retiring from business at Huntsville, Alabama, who introduced 
him to a wholesale house, saying : * Sell this man all the goods he wants. ' 
This endorsement was never dishonored, of course, and it is a noteworthy 
fact that after years of successful business the two young partners 
became each an itinerant Methodist preacher, one of them finally dying a 
member of the Texas Conference,' and the other, at an advanced age, fall- 
ing asleep in Jesus, a superannuated member of the Tennessee Confer- 
ence. 

''William G. Dorris never enjoyed the advantages of thorough college 
training, but he was nevertheless an educated man. His mind was dis- 
ciplined to think, and that is education. He was a self-made man, as 
every man is who is made at all or amounts to anything worth the men- 
tion. It is application, not genius, which makes the difference between 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1325 

men intellectually. This good man applied himself and learned from 
all sources. He gathered great store from books and had the gift of 
absorbing much from persons with whom he associated ; and even in his 
old age he conversed and preached out of the fullness of his mind to the 
delight and edification of his hearers. A wealth of incidents, anecdotes, 
and facts of life made him a charming fireside companion and a pecu- 
liarly interesting public speaker. 

** Common sense and intelligent judgment were conspicuous qualities 
of his mind ; hence it was not possible for him even to have bordered on 
fanaticism, or to have viewed any object so intensely as to Have seen 
it exclusively or disproportionately to other objects with which it stood 
related; therefore he always acted with sound wisdom and discretion. 
Hence he was a safe counselor, and one could scarcely have gone wrong 
in following his advice. He was an exemplification of the proverb: 
* Moderation is the daughter of wisdom and the mother of power. ' 

** Justice and Charity blended in his judgment of others, and he 
beheld the scales in equipoise even when weighing an enemy. With a 
judicial mind and a warm, sympathetic heart, none had cause for appre- 
hension in his hands. As a friend he was sincere, true and courageous ; 
in nothing was his individuality more distinctly and intensely marked. 
He was not the friend of the sunshine who 'when winter comes is flown.' 
Though all men might forsake his friend, he stood by him unmoved and 
immovable. 

*'As a Christian he was simple and sincere, and being very modest, 
he professed little but exemplified much. Like the sun which does not 
fire a cannon to announce his rising but simply shines, so he reflected 
Christ in his life, and every one took knowledge of him that he had been 
with Jesus. He illustrated Paul's definition of the gospel, *It is the 
power of God unto salvation to every one that believeth ; ' and his high- 
est claim was that he was a sinner saved by grace. He who claims 
more is self-righteous and puffed up, and is sure to behave himself 
unseemly. 

**As a preacher he was perspicuous and strong, instructive and 
edifying, therefore eminently useful. Having joined the Tennessee Con- 
ference in October, 1849, he preached his semicentennial sermon to his 
brethren of that body in session at Columbia, Tennessee, in October, 1899. 
It was a memorable discourse, reminiscential and spiritual and sounded 
like the trumpet blast of a superannuated captain urging his younger 
brethren on to tl\e battle from which he was retiring to receive his crown, 
for the crowning day was at hand. During the half century of his 
itinerant career he filled all grades of appointments, from the humblest 
to the highest, and ever acquitted himself like a man ; and at the great 
age of eighty-five years he peacefully fell asleep in Jesus." 

A copy of his semi-centennial sermon,, preached to the members of 
the Tennessee Annual Conference (in session October, 1899), at Colum- 



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1326 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

bia, Tennessee, is on file in the archives of Vanderbilt University, 
Nashville. 

Ruth Family: Having been repeatedly asked by the immediate 
membei*s of his own, as well as other branches of the family, to place 
in convenient form his knowledge of the family history, the writer has 
endeavored to outline briefly, such facts as may satisfy those who are 
interested. 

A little more than a century has elapsed since our country took its 
place among the nations; that period may mark the beginning of a 
family history as well as the birth of a nation. While our knowledge of 
those ancestors who existed before the first mentioned names, or of 
the ante-revolutionary period, has not come to us so complete as to be 
authentic, being only traditional, enough is known to say in truth, they 
were of respectability, with them, like those who succeeded them, **The 
post of honor is the private station." 

Of the record here made the writer has received much from his own 
parents; also from Mrs. Margaret Walsh, of Murfreesboro, daughter 
of James Ruth, now in the seventy-second year of her age. Some in- 
formation, also, some interesting tradition, was obtained from the late 
Robert Ruth, who was a son of David Ruth, first mentioned. Robert 
Ruth was bom in Raleigh, North Carolina. When a young man he came 
to Nashville, and died there at an advanced age. He was a man of much 
strength of character, and by extensive reading and study he attained 
a high literary culture. For some of the facts here stated, as well as 
a verification of his own knowledge, the writer is indebted to his sister, 
Mrs. W. 6. Dorris, of Avondale, Sumner county, Tennessee. 

David Ruth, with whom this record begins, was the son of James 
Ruth and Sarah Tenne Ruth, who came to Pennsylvania from Scotland 
with the tide of emigration to the Middle and Southern colonies, that 
began about the middle of the eighteenth century. David Ruth was a 
native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was bom about the year 1761. 
His ancestry were of Presbyterian faith. At the age of sixteen he was 
draughted into the service of the Continental Army, and was engaged 
in the battle of the Brandywine, September 11, 1777. He was married 
a few years subsequent to that period to Mary McGlochlin, the daugh- 
ter of Joshua McGlochlin, a Presbyterian minister, who lived near the 
city of Wilmington, N. C. Soon after his marriage he removed to 
Granville county. North Carolina. 

His immediate descendants were James, David, ^arah, Elizabeth 
and George Washington Ruth, the last named, being bom October 6, 
1799, was the youngest and father of the writer. There is a well au- 
thenticated tradition that he was honored with the name of ** George 
Washington" by reason of the following circumstances: — General 
Washington, during the month of November, 1799, made a tour of North 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1327 

Carolina and passed near the residence of David Ruth, the babe being 
a few weeks of age and unnamed, he was held a few moments in the arms 
of the first President. It is an historical fact that General Washington 
died of pneumonia contracted by reason of undue exposure on his re- 
turn from his tour, his death occurring the following month. About 
the year 1802 David Ruth removed to Raleigh, then coming into promi- 
nence as the capital of the state. At the age of seventeen George W. 
' Ruth was apprenticed to Mr. Jehu Scott, the ** Jeweler and Silversmith" 
of Raleigh, who was reputed to be one of the most skillful and thorough 
of his craft, having mastered his trade in the mother country. At the 
end if his apprenticeship he was discharged with full recommendations 
as to his skill as a workman, and as a ** young man worthy of confi- 
dence." With his discharge, he received a set of tools, some of which 
had been **much used but serviceable." With these and a limited ward- 
robe, a bundle of modest weight, he left Raleigh, determined to estab- 
lish himself in some of the rapidly developing states of the southwest. 
Leaving Raleigh, he traveled mostly on foot, passing through the states 
of South Carolina and Georgia, he at length reached Mobile, at that 
time the most prominent point in the territory of Alabama. Finding 
the field occupied, he directed his course to St. Stephens, then the terri- 
torial capital and land office. The town he described as being filled up 
with land speculators, adventurers and gamblers. While successful in 
his trade, he fell a victim to chills and finally a severe attack of fever. 
After a residence of near five months, he left St. Stephens in search of 
more healthful location. The town, from its unhealthy location, subse- 
quently fell into decay, and is now only known as a steamboat landing 
of little importance. 

Leaving St. Stephens, he visited Tuscaloosa, and then Huntsville, 
and stopping in the latter place, he worked a brief period for Thos. 
Cain, the pioneer *' watch maker and silversmith" of that place. From 
thence he went to Fayetteville, Tennessee, where he engaged to work 
for E. M. Ringo. His stay there was brief. He arrived in Shelbyville 
in the summer of 1822, and here he found he had been preceded by 
Daniel Turrentine, who was somewhat his senior, having immigrated 
from Hillsboro, North Carolina, a short time previous, and had already 
established himself. He, having had the advantage of a thorough 
master, Mr. Turrentine gave him employment, which position he re- 
tained for more than four years. On the 30th day of May, 1824, he 
was united in marriage to Miss Anne Downs, who was bom in the state 
of Maryland, near Baltimore, her father being James Downs, whose 
immediate ancestors were residents of Virginia, and members of the 
Church of England, her mother being Anne Shilcut, whose family were 
of Scotch origin, and of the Society of Friends (or Quakers). Her 
father died prior to her birth. Her mother died in giving her birth and 
she was given to her maternal grandmother. 



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1328 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

When about six years of age she was taken from her grandmother 
by relations of her father. She remembered crossing a large body of 
water in a boat, which was probably Chesapeake bay, her destination 
some distance from the opposite shore. She did not remain long, as an 
uncle Peter Shilcut, whom she quickly recognized, rode up to an or- 
chard fence, where she was playing with other children, she was taken 
upon the horse before him and carried away, he being on the road to 
Tennessee, where he settled. She was never informed as to the reasons 
that prompted either of those parties in their conduct to her, her uncle 
although treating her with great kindness and even consideration, gave 
her no intimation beyond expressing his purpose to give her means. 
.He did give her a substantial and comfortable home. But his death 
occurred soon after and no deed was given. He died intestate, being 
carried away after a few hours of illness of cholera in July, 1833. 
He was a pioneer merchant of Shelbyville, coming to that place soon 
after James Deery, who arrived with the first stock of merchandise in 
1811. Peter Shilcut is described by those who knew him to be an up- 
right merchant, of a taciturn manner, yet of a kindly nature. In ap- 
pearance he was of medium height, a swarthy face, black eyes and dark 
hair, his place of business was a two-story building of hewn cedar logs^ 
and stood on the spot now occupied by the Farmers Bank building, on 
the southwest corner of the public square. 

George W. Ruth after being in the employ of Mr. Turrentine for 
several years, at length entered into a partnership, the style of the 
firm being, Turrentine & Ruth. On the 30th of May, 1830, a de- 
structive cyclone swept over the business portion of Shelbyville, de- 
stroying totally their building, causing a serious loss in goods and mate- 
rial. This building stood on the spot now occupied by S. K. Brantley, 
and owned by him. It was a small frame one-story, and was rebuilt 
on the same place with a work shop and forge in the rear, and stood until 
removed to Depot street during the year 1855 or 1856, and torn away 
by Moses IVIarshall, Esq., giving place to his present brick building. 

Soon after the storm he was induced to remove to Lebanon, Ten- 
nessee, by Dr. Frazer, a leading citizen of that place. Not being satis- 
fied with the outlook, he returned to Shelbyville after an absence of 
nearly one year, again entering into business with Mr. Turrentine, 
which partnership continued until January 29, 1833, when they dis- 
solved by mutual consent, Mr. Turrentine remaining in the original 
stand. The following July cholera broke out in Shelbyville, Mr. Tur- 
rentine falling a victim to the great scourge. 

George W. Ruth lost by cholera three children within three days, 
Mary, the eldest, being eight years of age on the 3d of July, and 
Paulina aged six years, and Da^^d aged fifteen months on the 5th of 
July. 

Mr. Turrentine was a man of slight form, medium height, genial 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1329 

temperament, of strict integrity and great piety. The writer has been 
informed by Richard Foreman, Esq., that he visited him in company 
with his father, Richard Foreman, Sr., while on his death bed, his 
residence being on the spot now occupied by the residence of 0. Cowan, 
Esq. 

In 1837, George W. Ruth removed to Nashville, and entered the 
employ of Paul Negrin, a leading jeweler and silversmith, whose place 
of business was on what is now the comer of College and Deaderick 
streets. He remained with Mr. Negrin only about a year and a few 
months, when he returned to Shelbyville and resumed business at the 
old stand of Turrentine and Ruth. John M. Seaborn, Esq., a jeweler 
and silversmith, came to Shelbyville from East Tennessee in 1842, and 
entered into a partnership with George W. Ruth, but the firm was of 
limited duration, no date having been preserved. His failing health 
determined him to engage in a more active business. In 1849 he formed 
a partnership with the Hon. James Mullins, the firm being Ruth & 
MuUins, their stock being family groceries exclusively, this being the 
first firm to engage in that business in Shelbyville, such goods having 
been sold in all stores with other merchandise. They continued business 
several years. He then resumed his former business as jeweler, and 
up to the time of his death, occupied a building that stood on Depot 
street nearly opposite the store-rooms owned by Moses Marshall, Esq. 

George W. Ruth died on Friday morning, August 20, 1858. He was 
reared by Presbyterian parents, being early after his conversion or pro- 
fession of religion associated with Methodists, he continued a thor- 
oughly consistent member of that connection until his death. He was 
long a member of the Masonic fraternity, was mayor of Shelbyville, 
served many years as a magistrate, a steward in the church and filled 
other positions of trust in the community whose confidence he re- 
tained to the fullest extent. 

The following extract from his obituary written by the Rev. Wel- 
borne Mooney, who was his pastor, will show in strong light his char- 
acter as a churchman: 

**His life of unblemished holiness was indeed a living comment on 
the religion he professed; a comment known and read of all who knew 
him. He was a reading intelligent christian; well informed as to the 
doctrines of his church ; in fact, he was one of the best theologians we 
ever met among the laity of any church. At different times in his his- 
tory he filled the offices of class leader and steward, and filled them too 
with credit to himself and usefulness to his brethren. The death of 
such a man is a public calamity.*' 

The following is an extract from the notice of his death in the Shel- 
byville Expositor: 

** There was perhaps, no man, in the community more beloved and 
respected than the deceased. No one knew him but to love him.'' 



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1330 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

The following is a note to the writer from Joseph H. Thompson, 
Esq., who, in his early life, was engaged in business with him: 

**I knew George W. Ruth from my boyhood, but began to know 
him best when I entered his employ in 1846. He was then one of the 
merchants of Shelbyville. I remained with him until he went out of 
business, but my intimacy with him continued until his death in 1858. 
Mr. Ruth was a man of strong individuality. He was full of sympathy 
for humanity ; always a friend to the poor and the unfortunate. He was 
a man of nerve and courage ; and open, frank and manly ; hated sham ; 
despised intrigue and corruption. Although bom and reared by Pres- 
byterian parents, his early associations led him into the fold of Meth- 
odism. Mr. Ruth was a student, and to him the writings of the fathers 
of the church were familiar subjects. While a strong churchman, he 
never closed his eyes to the good that was in others. He was a good 
citizen, faithful in all the relations of life." 

The descendants of David Ruth were: David, who married Martha 
Woodard. Born 1790, died 1863. James, who married Elizabeth Nutt. 

Born 1789, died 1837. Sarah, who married Miller. Elizabeth, 

who married Barbour. George W., who married Anne Downs. 

The descendants of George W. Ruth were: Jane Maria, bom Feb- 
raary 11, 1828. Married Maj. Thos. J. McQuiddy, February 24, 1847. 
Elzira Stone, born October 26, 1829. Married Rev. William G. Dor- 
ris, October 27, 1853. Died, Pebraary 1, 1911. John Wesley, born 
February 27, 1839. Married Fannie E. Newton, March 26, 1865. Died, 
1906. Charles Leonidas, bom January 17, 1841. Married Julie T. 
Hardwick, July 16, 1867. George Anne, bom October 20, 1844. Mar- 
ried Robert Wright, October 31, 1872. Died March 8, 1880. Ambrose 
Driskell, born January 12, 1845. Married Jennie S. Newton, Septem- 
ber 24, 1867. Samuel Moody, bom March 30, 1848. Married Sophia 
Winfred, October 24, 1871. 

Sloss D. Baxter. Although heredity and environment have, may- 
hap, played some part in fashioning the life of Sloss D. Baxter, a suc- 
cessful attorney of Nashville, the development of his natural talents, 
his mental attainments, and his untiring devotion to the duties of his 
profession, have won him a high reputation for legal knowledge and 
ability. A son of the late Edmund D. Baxter, and grandson of Judge 
Nathaniel Baxter, he was bom, September 6, 1880, in Nashville, Ten- 
nessee, which he has always proudly claimed as home. 

Scholarly in his. tastes, and an ambitious student, Mr. Baxter ac- 
quired his early education under private tutors, and at Saint Albans, 
Radford, Virginia. In 1901, he was graduated from the law depart- 
ment of the Vanderbilt University, and since that time has been ac- 
tively and prosperously engaged in the practice of law in Nashville, 
where he has built up a large and lucrative clientele. 

Mr. Baxter married in February, 4900, Miss Corneille Lindsey, 
a daughter of A. V. S. Lindsey, of Nashville. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSBANS 1331 

Col. William Parsons Washburn. For nearly half a century, the 
late Colonel Washburn was a member of the bar of Kjioxville and east 
Tennessee. During that time he was associated with the most prominent 
men of his day, and himself became one of the most eminent in the 
group of lawyers who were the recognized leaders of the bar and as 
men of affairs in this section of the state. A successful lawyer, he was 
also identified with larger business and had a lar^ influence and place in 
public affairs. Colonel Washburn was a most wholesome type of citi- 
Jfen, clean in both private and public life, conscientious to a fault, and 
one whose ideals were high and who sought to live on a high plane. 

William Parsons Washburn came from distinguished ancestry, and 
of an old New England family. He was born in the old scholastic cen- 
ter at Amherst, Massachusetts, April 15, 1830. His parents were Rev. 
Royal and Harriet (Parsons) Washburn, natives respectively of Ver- 
mont and Massachusetts. The mother was the daughter of a minister. 
Rev. David Parsons, and her grandfather of the same name was one of 
the most noted ministers of the New England states. Rev. Royal Wash- 
bum was a clergyman of the Congregational church at Amherst, where 
his death occurred in 1833. 

The late Colonel Washburn was reared in Massachusetts, and 
received a collegiate education as a matter of course, being graduated 
from Amherst College in 1851. For several years he served as a tutor 
at Culpepper, Virginia, and in 1856, at the instance of Horace Maynard, 
came to Knoxville to prepare himself for the practice of law. He was 
at the beginning of his professional career when the Civil war broke out, 
and he espoused the cause of his adopted state, entering the Confederate 
army, and making a brave and patriotic irecord. After the war he 
returned to this city, and entered upon the practice of his profession 
with zeal and ability and success rewarded his efforts from the state. He 
formed a partnership with Mr. Horace Maynard who was for many 
years one of the leaders of the Knoxville bar, and their association 
through a long period brought the young lawyer into contact with the 
most prominent men of the day and rapidly promoted him to profes- 
sional distinction. Throughout his career as a lawyer. Colonel Wash- 
bum gave particular attention to equity causes, and ranked second to 
none as an equity lawyer. His fairness and honesty with his colleagues, 
his great respect for the law, and all who interpreted it, his fidelity to 
his clients, made him one of the most popular members of the Knox- 
ville bar. After the dissolution of his partnership with Mr. Maynard he 
became associated with General G. W. Pickle, and the firm of Washburn, 
Pickle & Turner continued for a number of years. About three years 
before his death, the firm dissolved and Colonel Washburn soon after- 
wards took into his oflSce his nephew, James Maynard, and the firm of 
Washburn & Maynard continued until the death of Mr. Washburn. 

Colonel Washburn was a Democrat in politics and took a prominent 



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1332 TENiNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

part in public life. He was many times named as special judge to 
serve in the lower courts, and was also at different times a special judge 
of the supreme court. One of the esteemed members of the Local Bar 
Association, and for his felicity of utterance he was often designated by 
the other members of the bar to speak on memorial occasions, and was 
equally popular as a speaker in social events. As a business man he was 
vice-president of the Knoxville Gas Company, was secretary of the 
Knoxville Car & Wheel Company, and was a director in the Mechanigs 
National Bank. Colonel Washburn was prominent as a church man, whs 
elder for a number of years in the Second Presbyterian church at Knox- 
ville, and for twenty years or more was superintendent of the Sunday 
school in that church. 

Colonel Washburn was twice married. In 1864 he married Mrs. 
Minnie (Brown) Leonard, who died in 1877. His second wife was 
Mrs. EJiza Maynard, daughter of Robert Harper. Mrs. T. 0. Baker of 
Brooklyn, New York, was an adopted daughter by his first marriage. 
The two children born to the second marriage were a daughter who 
died in infancy, and a son, William P. Washburn, who is mentioned in a 
succeeding paragraph. Mrs. Washburn and her son still reside at the 
old Washburn residence west of the city on the Kingston Pike, this 
home being considered one of the most beautiful in east Tennessee. 

William P. Washburn, Jr., son of the late Colonel Washburn, and one 
of the rising attorneys of Knoxville, was born in this city on August 30, 
1885. From the public schools he entered the University of Tennes- 
see, where he graduated in 1906, then became a student at Princeton 
University where he graduated with the class of 1907, and was subse- 
quently a student of the Harvard College of Law and spent one year in 
travel and study in Europe. His admission to the Knoxville bar 
occurred in 1909 and since then he has been rising rapidly to profes- 
sional distinction. His oflSce is in the Holston National Bank build- 
ing, and he resides with his mother on the Kingston Pike. 

JosiAH C. Duncan. In the death of Josiah C. Duncan on August 1, 
1911, Knoxville lost one of its most interesting and most highly 
esteemed citizens. In an age of electrical invention and usage, the career 
of Mr. Duncan was that of a pioneer. He belonged to the old-time tele- 
graphers, having been an operator during the war, and soon after the 
conflict taking charge of the telegraph office at Knoxville. He later 
identified himself with the newer application of electricity to the phon- 
etic telephone, and his name deserves remembrance for his connection 
both with telegraphy and telephony in this city. 

Josiah C. Duncan was born in Cumberland county, Virginia, in 
1840. He had only moderate advantages at school, but early in life 
manifested a practical energy, which carried him successfully through 
life. When he was eighteen years of age he began to learn the science 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1333 

of telegraphy, which at that time was still crude and only about thirteen 
years old. He made himself expert as an operator, and when the Civil 
war came on he was taken into the service with the Army of Tennessee 
as an operator, and gave a soldier's part in a position of special useful- 
ness in military operation. The year following the close of the war, in 
1866, he came to Knoxville to take charge of the Western Union Tele- 
graph Company, and continued in that service for a number of years. 
Throughout most of his active lifetime he was a student and experi- 
menter in electrical and phonetic science, and was one of the first men 
in Tennessee to assume practical direction of the new invention, the 
telephone. The invention of the telephone and its first practical demon- 
stration occurred in 1876, and four years later in 1880 Mr. Duncan organ- 
ized the East Tennessee Telephone Company at Knoxville. It was under 
his direction that the first telephone was introduced into use in that 
city, and he had the managemept of the local exchanges during their 
growth into general popularity. He became president and treasurer 
of the People's Telephone and Telegraph Company, and held that position 
during the latter years of his life. Mr. Duncan married Miss Fannie J. 
Brooks, a daughter of Gen. Joseph A. Brooks, who was prominent as a 
farmer, and a member of the State Guards during the war. His death 
occurred in 1879. Mr. and Mrs. Duncan were the parents of four sons. 
The late Mr. Duncan had an ideally h&ppy home and in his social rela- 
tions was a man of many kindly qualities and numbered his friends 
by the score. As a business man he was thorough and possessed of an 
energy which gave him a successful place among his contemporaries. He 
was ready at all times to assist in the upbuilding of his home city, and 
its advancement along civic and material lines. His family now reside 
at 1500 Cumberland avenue. 

Robert M. Jones. Among the attorneys of Knoxville, Tennessee, a 
high place is given to Robert M. Jones, of the firm of Wright and Jones. 
He is considered one of the most brilliant members of the Knoxville bar 
and added to his mental powers he has the capacity for hard work and 
close application. He is not only an able lawyer, he is also an honest 
one, and his personality has won him wide popularity. 

Robert M. Jones was bom in Roane county, Tennessee, on the 3d of 
September, 1870. His father is the Rev. Henry B. Jones, and his mother 
was Mary (Hudson) Jones. The Rev. Henry B. Jones was born in the 
state of Virginia and became a minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He became in time a widely known and very. influential minis- 
ter, and is still living, his wife having died in 1890. 

Robert M. Jones was one of seven children and after having passed 
through the public schools the question as to any further education pre- 
sented rather a blank face. He had always been brought up with the 
realization that an education was the most valuable weapon a man could 

Vol V— 



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1334 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

possess in his battle with life and therefore many sacrifices were made 
that he might be well equipped along these lines, for ministers do not 
receive munificent salaries. He attended Roane College and later 
became a student at a university, from which he was graduated in 1892. 

Having determined to become a lawyer the young man now entered 
the oflSces of T. Asbury Wright in Rockwood, and after four years of 
study, was admitted to the bar. This was in 1896 and immediately after 
his admission he began to practice in Roane county, where he resided 
until June 1, 1911, when he moved to Knoxville and formed a partner- 
ship with Mr. Wright, and this association has continued ever since, 
and is considered one of the reliable firms of Knoxville. 

Mr. Jones is a member of the Republican party and belongs to the 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons and to the Knights of Pythias. He 
is also a member of the Cumberland Club, and Cherokee Country Club. 

Hon. M. L. Ross. The wholesale grocery house of M. L. Ross & 
Company at Knoxville was founded and built up on the solid elements 
of commercial integrity, straightforward methods, and an almost unique 
energy of its chief executive oflScers. This company, starting on a small 
scale, finally came to possess a trade over half a dozen states, and was one 
of the commercial enterprises which gave character and stability to the 
city of Knoxville. 

The founder and for many years the head of this company whose 
death occurred May 30, 1899, easily ranked as one of Knoxville 's most 
prominent business men, and by his connection with the larger affairs of 
the city was equally useful and influential as a citizen. The late M. L. 
Ross was born in Anderson county, Tennessee, and was one of three chil- 
dren bom to James and Mary (Martin) Ross. The father, a native of 
Virginia, and of Scottish descent, was first married to a Miss Slover, by 
whom he had five children. He later married Miss Mary Martin. James 
Ross attained official distinction as a soldier under General Kirkpatrick 
during the War of 1812, and subsequently was engaged in merchandising 
for upwards of fifty years. His death occurred in 1869. During the 
first half of the nineteenth century, he was one of the leading men of 
the state and had a large circle of influential friends, including such 
men as John Bell, General ZoUicoffer, James K. Polk and Andrew John- 
son. 

The late Martin L. Ross was reared in a good home, and in an atmos- 
phere of reflnement and culture endowed by the many associations with 
such men as have already been named, and was a student at Emory & 
Henry College in Virginia when the death of his father occurred in 1869. 
That event caused him to leave college, and he returned home to take 
charge of a store in Anderson county. After managing this success- 
fully for a time he sought out a larger field for his enterprise and in 
1871 came to Knoxville. Here he formed a co-partnership with Major 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1335 

D. A. Carpenter, for the purpose of conducting a wholesale grocery 
business. The first name of the undertaking was Carpenter & Boss, 
and this continued until 1879. Mr. Boss in the meantime had become 
the chief executive of the concern and the firm name was then changed 
to M. L. Boss & Company. Under this title it came to possess a fore- 
most position as a wholesale grocery, and extended its trade to five or 
six of the adjoining states. 

In 1870 Mr. Boss married Miss Helen Carey, a daughter of Hon. 
William Carey, of Careyville, in Campbell county. Three children were 
bom to their union, and the two now living are Mary Martin and William 
Carey Boss. Mrs. Boss and her family have a very attractive and beau- 
tiful residence at 1415 Laurel avenue in Knoxville. 

BoBERT H. Haralson. The life of Bobert H. Haralson, of Lebanon, 
affords an excellent illustration of what independence, self-confidence 
and persistent effort can accomplish in a material way for an individual. 
The men of that stamp are also usually those that a community numbers 
as the leaders in the different phases of community affairs. This is true 
of Mr. Haralson, for besides demonstrating substantial business abilities 
as a farmer and stockman he has also given very efficient service in an 
official way and is now serving his third term as sheriff of Wilson county. 

This is his native county, for he was bom here June 18, 1866, a son 
of James and Annie (Young) Haralson. Both parents also were natives 
of Wilson county, the father's birth having occurred in 1832 and that 
of the mother in 1834, and both departed life there, the former having 
passed away in 1886 and the demise of the latter having occurred in 
1894. Nine children came to their union and of this family six are now 
living, Bobert H. being the third of those surviving. Both parents were 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church, South. James Haralson 
spent his life as a farmer and directed his efforts in that vocation with 
that intelligence that brought gratifying rewards and established him 
as a successful man. He was a member of the time-honored Masonic fra- 
ternity and of the Ladependent Order of Odd Fellows, and in the exer- 
cise of his franchise the Democratic party received his unswerving sup- 
port. When the long sectional quarrel flamed out at last into civil war 
he ranged himself with his native state on the side of the South and 
served three years in support of the Southern cause as a member of 
Hatton's Begiment. During the siege of Murfreesboro in 1864 he waa 
wounded and waa then discharged from the service on account of dis- 
'ability. He suffered heavily from the ravages of the war, having lost 
over forty mules, besides other property, but after the conflict closed he 
started out anew and at the time of his death had acquired a very com- 
fortable estate. His father was Zara Haralson, a Virginian by birth 
who came into Tennessee in an early day and settled on a farm in Wil- 
son county, where he spent the rem*ainder of his years. His estate com- 



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1336 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

prised some seven hundred acres of fine land and he was also a large 
slave owner. Annie Young Haralson, the mother of Robert H., was a 
daughter of William Young, a native of England, who after his immigra- 
tion to this country was located first in Pennsylvania but later removed 
from there to Wilson county, Tennessee. He was a farmer, a man of 
competence and was one of the best known citizens of Wilson county, 
where he served forty-two years as a justice of the peace. 

Robert H. Haralson grew up a farmer boy in Wilson county and 
received in the meantime a public school education. He began inde- 
pendent labor as a farm hand at twenty-five cents per day, and later 
took employment at sawing logs, for which labor he received forty 
cents per day and provided his own dinner. At the time of his mar- 
riage in 1891 he had a cash capital of $7.50 and was in debt $140, but 
he was young and had health, energy and pluck, assets that were worth 
more to him than unlimited inheritance, fie bought a farm and put 
his best abilities into play to pay for it. This he had accomplished 
by the end of the second year and he yet owns this farm of eighty-two 
acres. He has dealt considerably in stock and has been quite success- 
ful in that line of business venture. His entrance into oflScial life was 
made when he was elected constable. This was before he had attained 
his majority and he had to wait seven months to reach legal age and to 
be able to qualify for the office. After serving six years as a constable 
in Wilson county he took up similar duties for a time in Fannin county, 
Texas, as a special deputy sheriff, but later he returned to his former 
home in Tennessee. In 1908 he was elected sheriflf of Wilson county 
and has been twice re-elected, which fact gives conclusive evidence of the 
satisfaction he has given the citizens of his county in his service as 
sheriff and his conduct as a man. 

Mrs. Haralson was Miss Florence Martin prior to her marriage, a 
daughter of J. F. Martin, a well-known and successful farmer of Wilson 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Haralson have three children : Annie, at home ; 
Perry, who is attending school, and Robert, now three years old. Mrs. 
Haralson is a member of the Baptist church. Mr. Haralson sustains fra- 
ternal associations as a member of li|agnolia lodge. Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows at Lebanon, and as a member of the Modern Woodmen 
of America, in both of which orders he has held the highest office of 
his lodges. Politically he gives stanch allegiance to the Democratic 
party. 

J. Lewis Sadler, M. D., has been active in his profession since 1897, 
having seen service in Cuba as hospital steward in the Fourth Tennes- 
see Volunteers, after which he located in Nashville, Tennessee, continu- 
ing there until the time when he located in Johnsonville, in 1905. Since 
that time Dr. Sadler has been prominently identified with the medical 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1337 

profession in this city, where he has a well established practice, and an 
enviable reputation in his profession. 

Bom in Colbert county, Alabama^ on August 7, 1875, Dr. Sadler is 
the son of William George and Sarah E. (Sadler) Sadler, the mother 
being a distant relative of her husband. The father was born in Alabama 
in 1848 and was a son of Lewis Hubbard Sadler, one of the pioneer 
physicians of northern Alabama, himself the son of George Twyman 
Sadler, a civil engineer of the early days in Alabama. Lewis Hubbard 
Sadler came with his family into Tennessee about 1878, and engaged in 
the practice of his profession in Nashville, there dying in 1880. His 
son, William G., early identified himself with business interests and activ- 
ities in that city, and for several years was engaged as a traveling sales- 
man. He eventually became interested in the manufacture of fertilizers, 
and the .first ton of acid phosphate made from the Tennessee phosphate 
rock of Hickman and Maury counties was manufactured by him. Mr. 
Sadler is now secretary of The National Fertilizer Association, and is 
established in Nashville in a business way, although he maintains, his 
home at Monterey, where he has a fine residence. He is also interested 
to some extent in farming in Humphreys county, and is prominent and 
prosperous, taking an important place among the leading business men 
of this section of the state. He is an Independent Democrat and a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church. South. Fraternally, he is a 
charter member of Reynolds Lodge No. 33, of the Knights of Pythias, 
in which he is past grand chancellor. He is a Mason of the thirty-second 
degree, a Knight Templar, and is aflSliated with the Ancient Arabic Order 
of the Nobjes of the Mystic Shine, Al Menah Temple of Nashville. Mr. 
Sadler served in the Confederate army in an Alabama regiment, as did 
also his honored father. The mother of Dr. Sadler was bom in Robert- 
son county, Tennessee, at Sadlersville, and was married on December 
25, 1869. They became the parents of five children, four of whom are 
living : Edna L., married to Richard Preuit, of Leigh ton, Alabama ; Mary 
Lizzie, the wife of L. L. Haygood, of Humphreys cotinty ; Vashti Louise, 
married to W. W. Wilhoite, of Monterey, Tennessee ; and Dr. J. Lewis 
of this review. 

J. Lewis Sadler was educated in the public schools of Nashville, fol- 
lowed by a season in which he was placed in the hands of private tutors. 
He then entered the Vanderbilt University at Nashville and there pur- 
sued a medical course, graduating from that institution in 1897 with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. Dr. Sadler began the practice of his 
profession in Mount Pleasant, Tennessee, where he continued for the 
space of a year, after which he entered the army as hospital steward in 
the Fourth Tennessee Volunteers. Following his army service, Dr. Sad- 
ler located in Nashville, where he remained in practice until 1905, when 
he came to Johnsonville, and here he has been busily engaged in medical 
practice ever since. He has built up a representative and ever grqjving 



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1338 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

practice in the years that have passed, and is occupying a leading place 
in the medical fraternity in this section of the state, where his ability 
is recognized and acknowledged. 

Dr. Sadler is a stanch Democrat, and his fraternal relations are rep- 
resented by his membership in the Knights of Pythias. 

On November 9, 3911, Dr. Sadler was united in marriage with Miss 
Annie C. Parker, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James E. Parker, well- 
known residents of Johnsonville, in Humphreys county. The marriage 
took place at Johnsonville, Tennessee. 

Dr. Andrew B. Martin. In reviewing the career of Dr. Andrew B. 
Martin, it is interesting to note one highly important factor — ^heredity. 
Entirely a self-made man, still the stock from which he sprung gave him 
the impetus and patience to meet destiny more than half way and con- 
quer it. Dr. Martin is yet another portrait in the gallery of poor boys 
who have gained a measure of distinction. Dr. Martin is the son of 
Matthew M. and Matilda (Crow) Martin. The father was bom in Albe- 
marle county, Virginia, was a physician" who for a number of years 
conducted a practice in Smith county, and moved to Paris, Texas, with 
his family, where he died in 1849. He was a Mason and a member of the 
Presbyterian church. The mother was bom in the north of Ireland in 
1802 and died in Tennessee in 1876. Thus in the ancestry of Dr. Mar- 
tin is to be found the good old blood of Virginia and that of Ireland. 
Peter Martin, his grandfather, left Virginia, his native state, in 1792, 
and emigrated to Kentucky, where he lived the balance of his life in the 
vicinity of Bowling Green. A farmer, the stubborn soil yielded to his 
intrepid nature, and this not inconsiderable trait contributed to the 
physical capital of his grandson. On the other hand does he possess that 
rare asset, humor — so felicitous in easing the obstacles of the workaday 
world — for his maternal grandfather was a loyal son of Erin, who was 
born and died in his native land. 

Dr. Martin was born in Smith county, Tennessee, on December 9, 
1836. From the common schools he went to the law school of Cumber- 
land, from which he was graduated in 1858, after which he immediately 
began the practice of law, pursuing that calling until 1878, when he was 
elected professor of law in the Lebanon law school. He has been a mem- 
ber of the board of trustees of Cumberland University for forty-five 
years, and president of that board for more than thirty years. His life 
has been filled with big interests, not alone that of his profession, but 
politics and business of various natures. Notwithstanding his profes- 
sional prominence and activities, he has served the Democratic party in 
many capacities. He was at one time a presidential elector-at-large on 
Hancock's ticket, and he has represented state interests in the legisla- 
ture, of which he was a member from 1871 to 1872, acting in that time 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1339 

as chairman of the judiciary committee. The degree LL.D. was con- 
ferred upon him by Lincoln University of Illinois in 1883. 

Dr. Martin is a member of the Presbyterian church, and in addition 
to his interests there, his fraternal relations include such organizations 
as the Masons and the Knights of Pythias, and in the latter order he has 
served as chancellor commander, and as master in the former. He is 
also a member of the Knights of Honor. 

In 1868 Dr. Martin married Alice Ready, daughter of Charles Beady, 
of Murfreesboro, Tennessee. She, like her husband, was a member of 
the Presbyterian church and active in its work. Seven children were 
bom to them, four of whom are living. Mary, Martha, Helen and Andrea 
are the four surviving ones. The three first named are widowed, while 
Andrea is the wife of Ira J. Partlow, and lives in West Virginia. In 
1890 Mrs. Martin died, and three years later Dr. Martin married Sue 
Brittain, of Qeorgia. 

Dr. Martin maintains his home in Lebanon, Tennessee, and he is 
recognized as one of the most successful educators in his subject in the 
state. Aside from his professorship in the law school, he is financially 
interested in a number of industrial and manufacturing plants in the 
community, and is enjoying a degree of prosperity which is commensur- 
ate with the efforts he has expended in life thus far. 

Dr. PHUiiP N. Matlock, a successful physician and a prominent and 
influential citizen of Obion county, Tennessee, whose residence is at 
Masonhall, is a man of intrinsic merit as a man, a citizen and a physician, 
and as supporting evidence of this statement is his record of forty-three 
years of continuous service there in a professional capacity and the fact 
that he has held the highest position in the Masonic order in Tennessee 
that the Free and Accepted Masons of the state could confer upon him. 
He comes of Revolutionary stock and is himself a Confederate veteran 
of the Civil war. 

Philip N. Matlock was born in Davidson county, Tennessee, January 
9, 1844, and was the only son in a family of five children bom to Simp- 
son and Maria (Shumate) Matlock, both of whom were natives of David- 
son county. Simpson Matlock owned a farm of five hundred acres and 
was a citizen of prominence there. Philip N. grew up on the home farm 
and after pursuing the usual studies in the common schools of that local- 
ity he completed a course in Franklin College. It was about this time 
that the storm of civil war lowering finally burst over the country. 
In 1861 young Matlock, then but a youth of seventeen years, entered the 
Confederate service as a private in Harding's Artillery, being subse- 
quently transferred by the war department to Carter's Scouts with the 
commission of first lieutenant, which rank he held until the close of the 
war. He was thrice wounded, the first time at Stone's River on Decem- 
ber 31, 1862, when his right shoulder was injured. He was next wounded 



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1340 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

in his left thigh at Sulphur Branch Trestle, Alabama, September 2, 
1862, and on April 3, 1865, at Tuscaloosa, a few days before he sur- 
rendered, he received a wound in his right leg. Being paroled shortly 
afterward, he returned to his home in Tennessee and at once took up a 
course of medical study at Nashville College. Graduated in 1867 he 
began the practice of medicine, locating first at Fredonia, Kentucky, 
but removing in 1869 to Masonhall, Obion county, Tennessee, where he 
has since continued and where he is now the only representative of his 
profession. In line with the interest of his life work he sustains mem- 
bership in the Obion County Medical Society, the Tri-State Medical 
Society, the Tennessee State Medical Society and the American Medical 
Association. 

On June 18, 1865, was solemnized his marriage to Miss Mary J. 
Jetton, and to this union were born six children, three of whom are 
yet living, viz.: Philip E., and Preston C. and Presley (twins). 

Dr. Matlock has also literary gifts of considerable merit, and in a 
fraternal way is prominently aflBliated with the Masonic order as a 
member of the blue lodge, chapter and commandery. In 1896 he served 
as grand master of the Masonic Grand Lodge of Tennessee, is a past 
grand worthy patron of the Order of the Eastern Star of Tennessee, 
and is now (1912) grand sojourner of the Grand Chapter of Tennes- 
see. 

The Matlock family originated in Tennessee with William Matlock, 
the grandfather of Dr. Matlock, who came to this state from North Caro- 
lina in 1789. He was a soldier of the Revolution and was captured 
at Charleston by the British. His wife was Mary Simpson, who alone 
of her family survived from a murderous attack by Indians near Nash- 
ville, Tennessee. Simpson, the father of Dr. Matlock, was the youngest 
of ten children bom to William and Mary (Simpson) Matlock. 

Walter M. Castile, agent for the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis 
Railroad Company at Johnsonville, Tennessee, was bom in Camden, 
Benton county, Tennessee, on the 18th day of March, 1882, and is the son 
of JTames Monroe and Amy Jane (Cole) Castile, both bom in Benton 
county. The parents were both left orphans at an early age, and no 
records were preserved of their families so that it is impossible to give 
in this connection any further information concerning their ancestry. 
They were married in Benton county on September 23, 1867, and they 
became the parents of eight children, five of which number are yet liv- 
ing. Walter M., of this review, was the only son. The father was edu- 
cated in the common schools of Benton county and in the Benton Semi- 
nary at Camden, Tennessee. After leaving school he taught in the pub- 
lic schools for a number of years, and later was superintendent of the 
public schools of Benton county for a number of years. Later on he 
engaged in the milling and mercantile business. In 1910 he located in 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1341 

Johnsonville and is now making his home in this city. He served through- 
out the war in the Confederate army, and received seven wounds in the 
battle of Atlanta. He saw much active service, participating in many 
battles and was taken prisoner at Island No. 10 on the Mississippi river 
and spent several weary months in the prison at Chicago, Illinois. Mr. 
Castile is a Democrat, and has taken a prominent part in the politics 
of the state, serving in the state legislature from the 26th senatorial 
district. He and his wife are both members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and Mr. Castile is a member of the Masonic fraternity, aflSliat- 
ing with Camden Lodge No. 179. 

Walter M. Castile was educated in the public schools of Camden, and 
on leaving school he took up the study of telegraphy, at the age of 
twenty-two becoming active in the railroad service in the capacity of 
telegrapher. He was engaged in that work in the Camden office for five 
years, after which he was appointed agent at the Denver, Tennessee, office, 
where he continued for a period of nine months. His next appointment 
was that of agent at the Johnsonville office of the Nashville, Chattanooga 
& St. Louis, which position he has ably and efficiently filled since 1908. 

Mr. Castile, like his father, is a Democrat, and a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. South, as is also his wife. He is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity, Caldwell Lodge, No. 273, and of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, Lodge No. 606, at Denver. 

Mr. Castile was united in marriage in 1905 with Miss Bamma Gar- 
rett, the daughter of Mr. and IVIrs. John W. Garrett of Camden. They 
have no children. 

WiUiiAM Thomas McGlothlin. The really useful men of a com- 
munity are those in whom their fellow citizens can rely in affairs of 
public importance; to whom they can come for assistance in seasons of 
financial distress; men who have won this confidence by the wisdom of 
their own investments and by the honorable lives they have led on every 
field of effort and as neighbors and friends. Very often, in prosperous 
town^, these men are retired farmers and merchants, frequently they 
are bankers, and in not a few cases it will be found that they are veterans 
of that great struggle which makes the war between the states yet fresh 
after the passage of a half a century of time. Such a one in every par- 
ticular is W. T. McGlothlin, president of the Farmers' Bank of Portland, 
a citizen whose entire career has been one of industry,- integrity and up- 
right living. Mr. McGlothlin was bom in Sumner county, Tennessee, 
August 4, 1837, and is a son of James and Lucinda (Beard) McGlothlin. 

Joseph McGlothlin, the paternal grandfather of W. T. McGlothlin, 
was born in Ireland, and he and wife and one child emigrated to the 
United States in 1800, settling in Sumner county, Tennessee, where he 
reared a family and spent the rest of his life in agricultural pursuits. 
On the maternal side, Mr. McGlothlin 's grandfather was David Beard, 



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1342 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

who was born in Sumner county, and there spent his entire life in tilling 
the soil. James McGlothlin was born in Sumner county, October 21, 
1804, was reared on his father's farm, and eventually engaged in agricul- 
tural pursuits on his own account, accumulating a tract of 300 acres and 
becoming one of his community's prominent citizens. He was a Demo- 
crat in politics, a devout Christian, and a member of the Presbyterian 
church, in the faith of which he died November 3, 1856. He married 
Lucinda Beard, who was born in Sumner county, March 3, 1807, and 
she passed away August 15, 1853, having been the mother of six children, 
of whom four are still living, W. T. being the second in order of birth. 

W. T. McGlothlin received his education in the schools of Sumner 
county and Western Tennessee, and when the war between the states 
broke out was a student in Cumberland University. Abandoning his 
studies, he enlisted for service in Company B, Thirtieth Regiment, 
Tennessee Volunteer Infantry, in the Confederate army, with which or- 
ganization he served first as private, and after the reorganization as 
ordinance sergeant. He fought at Fort Donelson, where he was 
captured by the Union troops, but eventually, after seven months, 
managed to secure his exchange at Vicksburg, Mississippi, and at once 
rejoined his regiment, participating in the battles at Chickamauga, Mis- 
sionary Bidge, from Dalton to Atlanta, Franklin and Nashville, and then 
participated in his last battle, at Benton, North Carolina, April 26, 1865. 
A brave and cheerful soldier, he was respected alike by oflScers and men, 
and faithfully performed whatever duties fell to his lot, and when he 
returned to private life, he just as faithfully performed the duties of 
peace. On his return, he began life on a farm and taught school for 
several years, but in 1868 entered the mercantile business, in which he 
continued for ten years. Being industrious and thrifty, he wisely in- 
vested his earnings in farm land, which he disposed of several years 
ago to enter the Portland Bank. He was connected with that institution 
until 1911, when he became one of the organizers of the Farmers' Bank 
of Portland, of which he has since been made president. This institution 
is considered one of the solid and substantial banking houses of this part 
of the state, and is capitalized at $20,000, with $60,000 deposits. Mr. 
McGlothlin 's connection with the house has stimulated public confidence, 
and his wise and shrewd administration of its affairs has served to pop- 
ularize its cofl^ers. 

In September, 1874, Mr. McGlothlin was married to ^liss M. C. West, 
daughter of David and Mary (Wright) West, natives of Robertson, 
Tennessee, where they spent their lives in agricultural pursuits. Mr. 
and Mrs. McGlothlin are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
He is a Master and Royal Arch Mason and a Democrat in polities. 

James Thomas Baskerville. Prominent among the legal talent of 
Sumner county, Tennessee, is James T. Baskerville, of Gallatin, a former 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1343 

state senator from this district, who is not only one of the best lawyers 
of Gallatin but is of high standing as a citizen and business man. He 
springs from Revolutionary ancestry on the paternal side and is of Irish 
lineage by maternal descent, and both the Baskervilles and his mother's 
people, the McQlothlins, are numoered among the oldest and nnst re- 
spected connections of Sumner county, the former having been established 
here as early as 1801. The Revolutionary ancestor referred to was Rich- 
ard Baskerville, the great-grandfather of James T., who fought in the 
Revolution as a Virginia patriot and whose son, Thomas, bom in the 
Old Dominion state, came to Tennessee as a settler in 1801. Thomas 
located on a farm in Sumner county, where he spent his remaining years 
as an agriculturist. His son, Abner, the father of James T., was bom 
in Sumner county, Tennessee, in 1838 and is yet living. As a loyal 
soldier of the South he served the cause of the Confederacy during the 
Civil war as a member of the Thirtieth Tennessee Regiment and partici- 
pated in all of the principal engagements in Tennessee up to and includ- 
ing the battle of Chickamauga, where he was severely wounded. He was 
detained in the hospital several months but upon his discharge was un- 
able for further military service and returned to his home in Sumner 
county. He took up farming as his vocation, and in later years has 
filled different public oflSces of responsibility, having served as tax asses- 
sor of Sumner county from 1892 to 1896, and as a county trustee from 
1900 to 1906. In political affairs he has always been a stanch adherent 
of the Democratic party, and in church memberrfiip he is identified with 
the Christian denomination. He owns a good farm in this county and 
now devotes all of his time to its management. In this county he wedded 
Nancy J. McGlothlin, who was bom in Sumner county in 1840 and passed 
away at the old homestead here in 1907, a devoted member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. South. * Her father was James McGlothlin, an 
early settler of Sumner county, who continued his residence here until 
his death. His father, Joseph, immigrated to this country from Ireland. 
Of the children born to Abner and Nancy (McGlothlin) Baskerville, 
five are living and are as follows: James T., of this review; R. H., a 
Sumner county farmer; J. A., a bookkeeper in the comptroller's oflSce at 
Nashville, Tennessee; SaUie, who is a teacher and resides at Portland, 
Tennessee ; and J. E., who also is a resident at Portland, Tennessee. 

James T. Baskerville was educated in the common schools of Sumner 
county and in the Franklin training school, Franklin, Kentucky, and 
was prepared for law at Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tennessee, 
where he was graduated in 1896. Shortly thereafter he b^an the active 
practice of his chosen profession at Gallatin, where he rose rapidly at the 
bar and now stands at the fore among the best legal talent of Sumner 
county. He has a large clientage and is admitted to practice in all the 
courts of the state, his success being the reward of merit and untiring 
effort to make his professional efficiency that of the highest order. He 



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1344 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

has been city attorney of Gallatin eight years. Like his father, Mr. 
Baskerville is a stanch Democrat and is one of the strong and influen- 
tial workers in Sumner county in behalf of his party. He was a member 
of the state Democratic executive committee 1906-1907. He was his 
party's successful candidate for the state senate in 1908 and sat in that 
body in 1909 and 1910, proving an exceptionally energetic and able 
member during his service. The high appreciation in which he was held 
by his colleagues was attested by his important committee duties and 
other responsible distinctions. He was chosen to serve on the judiciary 
committee, the committee on ways and means, as well as on several other 
committees, and was made chairman of the committee on constitutional 
amendment. He is a good business man as well as a good lawyer and 
holds a number of profitable investments in this vicinity. As a prominent 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows in this state he is now 
serving as conductor in the Tennessee grand lodge of this order; and 
through his firm belief in its benevolent principles and his homiletic skill 
as an expositor of its teachings he has been of much service to the order 
in making addresses before its different lodges in this state and for 
years has been frequently called for this service. His religious faith 
is expressed by membership in the Christian church. 

In April, 1901, Mr. Baskerville was happily married to Miss Lua 
King, a daughter of William H. and Mary E. (Harcourt) King. Mr. 
King was a native of Mississippi but removed to Sumner county, Tennes- 
see when a young man and was agent for the Adams Express Company 
at Gallatin for many years. He passed away in Sumner county. Mr. 
and Mrs. Baskerville are the parents of three children, named : Marion, 
Nancy and Amelia, who are now aged respectively ten, seven and two 
years. 

Robert Edward Saunders, the well known live stock dealer of Sum- 
ner county, is one of the prosperous and substantial farmers of that 
county, where he was born February 14, 1859, a son of H. H. and Eliza- 
beth M. (Bondurant) Saunders. The birth of H. H. Saunders occurred 
in the same county in October, 1819, while his wife was born in Davidson 
county in 1829. H. H. Saunders engaged in agricultural pursuits with 
much success, becoming the owner of over six hundred acres of land, 
and he and his brother, William, were the pioneer merchants of Saun- 
dersville, the former also having served in the Seminole Indian war. 
Of the eleven children born to him and his wife, four are now living, of 
whom the subject of this sketch is the sixth in number. Previously a 
Whig, after the war he became a Democrat, and he and his wife were 
enthusiastic workers in the Methodist Episcopal church. He died in 
1879, she surviving until September, 1906. 

One of the first preachers of the Methodist Episcopal denomination 
in Tennessee, Rev. Herbert Saunders, the paternal grandfather of R. E. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1345 

Saunders, came, in 1798 from Culpeper county, Virginia, to Sumner 
county, Tennessee, where he built the first Methodist EiJiseopal church 
in the county — Saunders' chapel. He married a niece of Patrick Henry 
— Miss Russell, who had seven brothers in the Revolutionary war, one 
of whom was Robert Russell, a general of note under General Washing- 
ton. The maternal grandfather of R. E. Saunders, Jacob Bondurant, 
settled early in Davidson county and engaged in farming, becoming 
the owner of a large estate and a large slave holder. Rev. Hubbard 
Saunders was a great lover of fine horses and imported some very val- 
uable ones from Virginia. He raised Tenn, Oscar, Nell Saunders, and 
imported from Europe, Wonder, one of the greatest stallions in the 
South. Rev. Herbert Saunders and wife and also the father and mother 
of Robert E. Saunders, are buried in the Saunders cemetery on the old 
Saunders homestead. 

After his common school education was completed, R. E. Saunders 
attended high school, being instructed by Capt. C. S. Douglas, who con- 
ducted a high school in Hendersonville. Farm life has appealed to Mr. 
Saunders from the beginning and he has never diverted his attention 
from this pursuit, being especially interested in live stock. He owns the 
good farm where he lives and where live also his brothers, W. B., Joseph 
E. and J. T. Saunders, together with whom he owns the homestead 
which has been in the family for over one hundred years. He is a heavy 
trader in all kinds of live stock. A magistrate for twelve years, he has 
been reelected for six years more, has been a school director for ten or 
twelve years, is a Democrat in politics, and a Mason, being past master 
of Saundersville lodge, No. 359. Mr. Saunders has never married. 

James W. Blackmore. One of the best known and most highly re- 
spected citizens of Sumner county, Tennessee, is James W. Blackmore, 
of Gallatin, prominent for years as one of the ablest members of its bar, 
as one of its leading financiers, and who as soldier and public oflScial 
has performed that service that gives him recognition among Tennes- 
see's honored men. He wore the **gray'' four years in defense of the 
southland, and his service in a later period as state senator was marked 
by the same earnest effort and conscientious devotion to the interests and 
welfare of his state of Tennessee, while as president of the First National 
Bank of Gallatin he has long been a dominant factor in the financial 
circles of Sumner county. The name of Blackmore is a familiar one in 
Sumner county, for the family was established here more than a century 
ago and its members have ever maintained the name in high prestige for 
worth and attainment. 

George D. Blackmore, the originator of the family here, born and 
reared in Maryland, ran away from home as a youth and after serving 
throughout the Revolution as a member of the patriot army, came to 
Tennessee. He settled on a farm in Sumner county and continued there 



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1346 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

until his death. He became a well known pioneer of thi^ section, and as 
a major in th^ state troops took an active and leading part in driving 
the Indians from the state. His wife was Elizabeth Neely, a daughter 
of Capt. Alexander Neely, who was killed by the Indians. The career 
of William M. Blackmore, their son, and the father of James W. Black- 
more, of this review, is a part of the Tennessee history of his time. He 
was born on the Sumner county homestead in February, 1803, was edu- 
cated here and took up law as his profession, being admitted to the bar 
along in the '20s. Rising rapidly in his profession, he also became a 
prominent figure in the Democratic political circles of the state, and 
served as a member of the state legislature in 1848 and 1849. Previous 
to this he served as a soldier in the Mexican war, and was captain of Co. I, 
First Regiment, Tennessee Infantry. He was elected a brigadier of the 
state militia, and with his command participated in the battles of Mon- 
terey, Vera Cruz and Cerro Gordo. He was a prominent member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows in this state, was a charter mem- 
ber of Howard lodge, No. 13, at Gallatin, and at one time served as grand 
master of the Tennessee grand lodge of this old and honored order. As 
a lawyer he excelled and for years maintained an extensive practice. He 
served as attorney general of this district at one time and was a clerk 
and master in chancery of the Sumner county court at the time of his 
death in November, 1853. No less able and successful as a financier, 
he left a large estate at his death. Rachel J. Barry, who became the wife 
of William M. Blackmore, was bom in Sumner county, Tennessee, in 
June, 1812, and died in her native county in June, 1843, a consistent 
member of the Presbyterian church, and the mother of three children, of 
whom James W. Blackmore is now the only survivor. She was the 
daughter of Redmond D. Barry, who was born near Dublin, Ireland, and 
was educated in the University of Dublin. As a surgeon he took service 
in the English navy, but later he resigned on account of his s>Tnpathy 
and friendship for the American colonies, -finally deciding to cast his 
fortunes with them. Locating first in North Carolina, he practiced med- 
icine there a number of years, but subsequently took up the study of 
law under the father of John C. Breckenridge, and followed law in 
Tennessee for the remainder of his life, becoming a very wealthy man 
for his time. He died in Sumner county in 1821. He was a Catholic in 
religious faith but he married Jane Alexander, a daughter of William 
Alexander and a staunch Presbyterian, who reared her children in 
her own faith. 

James W. Blackmore, the youngest child of his parents, was born in 
Sumner county, Tennessee, March 9, 1843. After pursuing the usual 
preliminary studies in the public schools of Gallatin he entered Central 
University, Danville, Kentucky, where he was a student in the sopho- 
more class when the Civil war broke out. In this struggle he was in 
sympathy with the South, convincing evidence of which loyalty he gave 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1347 

by promptly enlisting in Company I of the Second Tennessee Infantry, 
with which he remained in service four years to a day. He participated 
in the first battle of Manassas, Virginia ; the battles of Richmond and 
Perryville, Kentucky; Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, and Mis- 
sionary Ridge, Tennessee ; Dalton, Jonesboro and Atlanta, Georgia ; and 
then served under General Hood to Nashville and on his retreat through 
Tennessee and into North Carolina, surrendering with the troops at 
Greensboro, North Carolina, on the day that closed his four years of 
service. 

Resuming his interrupted studies, he completed his literary course 
and then took up the study of law with Judge Joseph C. Guild as bis 
preceptor, subsequently completing his legal studies in Cumberland 
University, Lebanon, Tennessee, where he was graduated in law in 1867. 
On his admission to the bar immediately afterward, he began the prac- 
tice of law with George B. Guild, continuing this association until 1871, 
since when Mr. Blackmore has labored independently, his practice exten- 
ing to all the courts. He has always been a staunch Democrat and has 
always taken a prominent part in the local political councils of his party. 
As state senator representing Sumner, Robertson and Trousdale counties, 
he served in the Tennessee state legislature from 1883 to 1885 and at 
that time gave eflScient service as a member of the bond committee that 
settled the state debt, serving also as chairman of the railroad committee. 
As a strong and able lawyer he has long stood among the fore in his pro- 
fession in SuDiner county, and has served as city attorney of Gallatin. 
He has showi. no less strength as a business man and as president of 
the First Muiional Bank of Gallatin he has directed the affairs of the 
bank wiUi wisdom, fidelity and great financial ability. He also has 
heavy boldings in land and city property hereabout and ranks as one 
of the most substantial men of Sumner county. 

In November, 1871, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Blackmore 
and Miss Mariah L. Ewing, daughter of William B. Ewing, who was a 
successful farmer of Davidson county, Tennessee. She was an active 
and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church. South, and 
died in March, 1896. In 1900 Mr. Blackmore took as his second wife, 
Miss Lola Ezell, a native of Marshall county, Tennessee, and a daughter 
of J. B. Ezell, a prominent farmer of that county. Mr. and Mrs. Black- 
more are both members of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, and 
Mr. BJackmore has been superintendent of the Sunday school of that 
denomination in Gallatin since 1877. He is a member of the Beta Theta 
Phi college fraternity. An able worker in his various avenues of activity, 
his life and services have been of that character which well entitles him 
to consideration in this history of Tennessee and Tennesseeans, for in 
every service he has honored the state that gave him birth. 



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1348 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Morris Streng Wile. The ability to make a prosperous career from 
a beginning without capital and with only the resources of personal 
character has been well displayed in the life of Mr. Wile, who is head of 
the Gallatin ]\Iilling Company and otherwise prominently connected 
with local business affairs. 

Mr. Wile is a native of Sumner county, where he was born August 13, 
1868. His parents were L. and Jennie (Streng) Wile. The maternal 
grandparents were Joseph and Fannie Streng, both of whom were na- 
tives of Germany, and the former died in Mississippi of the yellow fever 
in 1878. He spent a number of his years as a merchant. Mr. L. Wile, 
the father, was born in Germany in 1824, and passed away in 1911, His 
wife was born in New York state in 1845. The father, coming to America 
a young Inan, met and married his wife at Louisville, Kentucky, in 1866. 
Prom that city he came to Gallatin, where he was a merchant, running 
a general store for a number of years. He accumulated a very good 
estate, although he had some severe business reverses during a portion 
of his career. Of his two children the only one now living is the Gallatin 
miller. The family were members of the Jewish faith, and the father 
was in politics a Democrat. During the Civil war he served as a soldier 
on the southern side, and from a wound received in service carried a 
bullet to his grave. 

Morris S. Wile attended the common schools at Gallatin as the begin- 
ning of his education, but when he was thirteen years old his father failed 
in business, and from that time on he had to make his own way. It was 
with this handicap that he started in life, and has always been self-sup- 
porting. Up until he was about twenty-one years of age, he was em- 
ployed chiefly in his father's store. At that time he began work in a mill, 
and milling has since been his principal occupation. He finally acquired 
the majority of the stock in the Gallatin Milling Company. The mill 
has a capacity of one hundred and fifty barrels of flour per day, is a 
modern and up-to-date institution, and its products are shipped through- 
out the state. At the present writing over sixty thousand bushels of 
wheat are stored ready for the grinding, besides a large amount of com 
and other grains, these figures indicating the extent of the business. Mr. 
Wile is also a stockholder and director in the First National Bank of 
Gallatin. 

He was married in January, 1899, to Bettie Abraham. She is a native 
of the state of Mississippi, and they are the parents of one child, ^amed 
Simon A., now nine years old. The family are communicants of the 
Jewish church, while Mr. Wile is aflBliated with the Masons and the 
Knights of Pythias, being past chancellor commander of the latter order 
and for some years has taken an active part in the work of the order. 
In politics he is a Democrat. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1349 

Thomas Y. Carter, M. D. All of the efforts of Dr. Thomas Y. Carter 

are centered in the profession for which nature and education have fitted 

him — the practice of medicine. This concentration of effort has rendered 

■ his skill and ability unusually effective and has resulted in a high degree 

of eflSciency in his work. 

Dr. Carter was born in Sumner county, Tennessee, November 22, 
1879, the only child of J. A. and Alice (McDole) Carter, both of whom 
are now living in that county. Bom in Virginia in 1848, Dr.*Carter's 
father in his early youth came with his parents to Tennessee, where he 
has been very successful in his agricultural pursuits. Politically, he is 
a Democrat, and has served as steward in the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Dr. Carter's mother was born in Sumner county in 1856. 

A Virginian by birth, Thomas Carter, paternal grandfather of Dr. 
Carter, came to Tennessee about 1850, where he bought a large portion of 
land, and at the time of his death was the owner of six hundred or seven 
hundred acres. The maternal grandfather of Dr. Carter, P. A. J. 
McDole, was also a native of Virginia and a successful farmer, who 
came to Tennessee from Kentucky. 

Choosing the medical profession as his life work. Dr. Carter pursued 
his studies at Bowling Green, Kentucky, and Vanderbilt University, 
Nashville, graduating from the latter institution in 1905. Since then 
he has been practicing medicine in Westmoreland, where he is held in the 
highest esteem and where the undivided attention he gives his work is 
much appreciated. 

Dr. Carter's marriage to Lillian Poster occurred in June, 1910. She 
is a daughter of W. B. Poster, a lumberman of Allen county, Kentucky. 
One child, Annie Joe, fourteen months old, has been bom to bless the 
union of Dr. and Mrs. Carter. The doctor and his wife are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and he belongs to the I. 0. 0. P., 
M. W. A., and W. 0. W., and is a member of the county, state. South 
Medical and American Medical associations. 

Exclusively devoted to his chosen profession. Dr. Carter has been 
eminently successful from the beginning and enjoys a very large and 
lucrative practice. The attention he gives his patients is not a perfunc- 
tory service, but is characteristic of the whole hearted manner in which 
he applies himself to his work. 

John M. Hodges. An important factor in any community is the 
banker. To him the patrons of his institution and others look for guid- 
ance in their financial affairs and upon the advice, which his investing 
experience enables him to offer, they often make decisions regarding their 
own problems. The stability of a bank is largely measured by the char- 
acter and conservatism, the wisdom and experience of its oflScers and 
directors. As cashier of the Westmoreland Bank, Mr. Hodges stands 
for all that is most desirable in an institution of this kind, and conducts 

Vol. V— 10 



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1350 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

its affairs in a maimer that gains the confidence of the people in general, 
who feel that he is a man whose judgment can be relied upon both in the 
inyestment of the funds of the bank and in assistance rendered its pa- 
trons. In the esteem of those with whom he has had direct business rela- 
tions, he stands very high. 

Bom in Sumner county, Tennessee, November 20, 1875, Mr. Hodges 
is a son of C. W. and Sophia (Martin) Hodges, both of whom were born 
in that county, the former in 1853 and the latter in 1858. C. W. Hodges, 
like his ancestors, belongs to that class of tillers of the soil who have found 
in farming both a profitable and satisfying occupation. Well known 
in his community and very prosperous, he now lives on his farm in his 
native county, where he raises wheat, com, oats and tobacco. To him 
and his wife were born three children: John M., the subject of this 
sketch ; Belle, the wife of C. C. Brown, a farmer of Sumner county ; and 
Thurman T., who died in 1912. C. W. Hodges is a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church, and his fraternal affiliations are with the P. & A. 
M. and I. O.jO. F., belonging to Bethpage Lodge, No. 521, F. & A. M. 
He is a Democrat in politics and has served as justice of the peace. 

The Hodges were among the first settlers in Tennessee, coming from 
Virginia at a very early date, and the family is one of the oldest in the 
state. Samuel W. Hodges, father of C. W. Hodges and grandfather of 
John M. Hodges, was a well known and successful farmer and slave 
owner of Sumner county, who served under Jackson in the Seminole 
Indian war. In this county also John M. Hodges' maternal grandfather, 
Lewis L. Martin, was bom and lived the life of a prosperous farmer. 

John M. Hodges was educated in the public schools of his native 
county and later took a college course at Bethpage. The fourteen years 
of his pedagogical experience following fitted him well for the office he 
was to hold later, for in the study of human nature which teaching in- 
volves, he learned much of incalculable value in any business pursuit 
where insight is required. 

In January, 1907, John M. Hodges was elected assistant cashier of the 
Westmoreland Bank, and in September of the same year cashier, which 
office he is holding at the present time. This bank has a capital of $8,000 
and surplus and undivided profits of $1,000, and its average deposits 
amount to $50,000. In conducting the affairs of this bank, Mr. Hodges' 
prudence, insight and wisdom have been apparent on many occasions. 
He is justice of the peace and a member of the county Democratic execu- 
tive committee, and has served as auditor of the county officers' books. 
Belonging to the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics a Demo- 
crat, his fraternal affiliations are with the F. & A. M. as past master, the 
I. 0. 0. F. as past grand, the Jr. 0. U. A. M. as past councillor and the 
M. W. of A. as deputy head consul, being also a member of the 0. E. S. 

The marriage of Mr. Hodges to Carrie Bradley occurred in Septem- 
ber, 1898, she being a daughter of J. W. Bradley, a prosperous farmer 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1351 

of Sumner county, now retired, who served for a period of four years 
in the Confederate army. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Hodges were 
bom five children: Joy and Virgil, Paul, Eve and Eva May, twins, in 
school, and Wayne, the baby. 

Mr. Hodges' resourcefulness ^nd his ability to meet in a masterful 
way every contingency which has arisen have marked him as a self-reliant 
man. His business integrity, character, ability and personality have 
made him most highly esteemed and respected among his fellow men. 
He is a self-made man in every sense of the word. 

» Hon James H. Bate. Former state senator from Sumner county, the 
Hon. James H. Bate well upholds the prestige and dignity of a family 
which has been notable in Tennessee hisfbry for the greater part of a 
century. Men of this name have held many high posts in the local and 
state affairs, one of them being governor and others distinguished in 
military service. James H. Bate, himself, had a gallant record as a 
soldier, and was the captain of his company during the Civil war. A 
number of years he spent in Texas, but he has returned to Sumner 
county to pass the declining years, of his life, and he now has a com- 
fortable farmstead at Castalian Springs, the old homestead of the 
family. 

James H. Bate was bom in Sumner county, Tennessee, October 16, 
1841. He is a son of James and Amanda P. (Weathered) Bate. Grand- 
father Humphrey Bate was a native of North Carolina and he came to 
Tennessee with his family and became one of the early settlers and 
farmers of Sumner county, where he spent the remainder of his life. 
Closely related to the Bate family is the Brimage family. They came 
from England, and one of the family, Wm. Brimage, served as governor 
of the Island of Bermuda under appointment from King Qeorge III 
after which he settled in North Carolina. 

James Bate, the father, was bom in North Carolina, and during 
young manhood came to .Tennessee, where he died in 1842, having spent 
many years in Sumner county. His business was that of farming, and he 
owned a large acreage and managed his plantation with slave labor. He 
was a captain in the Tennessee State Militia. His wife, Amanda Bate, 
was a daughter of William Weathered, who was a Virginian, and came 
from that commonwealth into Tennessee. He was one of the successful 
farmers of this state in the early days. James Bate and wife were the 
parents of four children, some of whom are distinguished. William B. 
was formerly United States senator and also governor of Tennessee. 
Oapt. Humphrey Bate, the second son, was killed at the battle of Shiloh 
while in the command of his company. Elizabeth P., the only daughter, 
became the wife of Major E. P. Tyree, who was a major in the service 
during the Civil war. The other is James H. Bate, the subject of this 
sketch. 



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1352 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

The last named received his education in the Rural Academy of 
Sumner county, after which he spent two years in Bethany College, of 
West Virginia, the famous old school in the Pan Handle of that state, 
established by Alexander Campbell, the founder of the Christian denom- 
ination. The outbreak of the Civil waj found him in pursuit of knowl- 
edge at this institution and he at once entered the army as a private, 
but in 1863 was made captain. He was first under fire at Aquia Creek, 
also fought at the first battle of Manassas, and was in the first regiment 
to reenlist for service. As a veteran he participated in the battle of 
Chickamauga, the battle of Missionary Ridge and several other of the 
important engagements which marked the struggles of the northern and 
southern armies in the southern half of the Confederacy. His experience 
as a soldier continued for four ;f ears, during the entire period of the war. 

After returning from the field of battle, his home for five years was in 
Memphis, where he. was employed as a collector for one of the wealthy 
men of the city. This was followed by a farming experience, after which 
he went to El Paso, Texas, being a passenger on the first railroad train 
run into that city, which was in about 1881. He has the distinction of 
having constructed the first international street railroad in the state of 
Texas, and edited one of the first papers in the western part of that state. 
During his residence of five years in Texas he accumulated a good deal 
of money by his different ventures, and then returned to Sumner county, 
which has been his home to the present time. He is the owner of three 
hundred acres of land comprising the old Bate homestead near Castilian 
Springs. The old place where he was born and with which are connected 
so many family associations was built in 1840. 

Mr. Bate was married in 1897 to Rebecca Allen, the daughter of Van 
Allen, who was one of the prosperous farmers of Sumner county. The 
two sons of their marriage are William B. and Francis X., both of whom 
are school boys. Mrs. Bate is a member of the Presbyterian church, 
while his church is the Baptist. Politically he is a Democrat, and in 1897 
represented the county in the lower house of the legislature, and in 1898 
was returned as a state senator. 

Hon. Marcus D. Rickman, of Hartsville, farmer, miller and mem- 
ber of the state legislature, is a native son of Tennessee and a descendant 
of two of the state's most worthy pioneer families. His paternal grand- 
father, Mark Rickman, was a native of North Carolina. During the 
Revolutionary war he served under Gen. Nathaniel Greene, and at the 
close of that conflict received a grant of land in Tennessee for his mili- 
tary services. He removed to Tennessee in 1787, and his daughter, Nancy 
Rickman, was the first female white child born in the city of Nashville. 
His son, Samuel H., the father of Marcus D., was born in Sumner county, 
Tennessee, in 1805, and passed his life upon the farm where he was bom, 
his death occurring in 1892. He was a successful man and at one time 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1353 

was the owner of about fifty negroes. He served as colonel in the state 
militia, was widely known, popular and well respected, was a Democrat 
in his political convictions, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He married Prances E. Henry, a native of Sumner county, 
where she was born in 1829, a daughter of Jack H. Henry, also a native 
of that county, and a granddaughter of William Henry, who came to 
Tennessee from Virginia when the region now included in Sumner 
county was a wilderness. The only settlement of consequence in that 
section of the state at that time was the one at Castalian Springs. The 
Henry family is of Irish extraction. Jack H. Henry served in the Semi- 
nole war. He was a Methodist Episcopal minister for many years and 
died at the age of eighty-two years. Ten children were born to Samuel 
H. and Prances E. Rickman, five of whom are still living. The mother 
died in 1897. Like her husband and father, she was a devout member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church and was popular among her neighbors 
for her many little acts of Christian charity. 

Marcus D. Rickman, the second child of the family, was born in 
Sumner county, Tennessee, August 18, 1849. He was educated in the 
public schools of his native county and began life on the farm. About 
1880 he embarked in the sawmilling business, and in 1896 he built a model 
flour mill with a capacity of one hundred barrels of flour daily. In con- 
nection with this mill he also operates a com mill and ships meal and 
flour to all the territory within reach of Hartsville. Notwithstanding 
his active operations as a miller, he has always retained his interest in 
agriculture. Although he is classed as a Democrat, he is rather inclined 
to be independent in his political views. Since he was twenty-two years 
of age he has served as a magistrate. In 1909 he was elected a member 
of the state legislature, and in 1912 was reelected. While in the legisla- 
ture he served upon the important committees on agriculture, redistrict- 
ing the state for members of the general assembly, and banking and 
commerce. To the office of legislator he brought the same careful methods 
that have distinguished him in his conduct of his private afl^airs, and the 
interests of his constitutents were always faithfully guarded in the sup- 
port of bills that would promote their general prosperity or the defeat 
of measures that he regarded as inimical to their welfare. Mr. Rickman 
is a member of the Masonic fraternity and has served his lodge as wor- 
shipful master. The teachings of this time-honored order form the basis 
of his ideals of good citizenship, and the tenets of brotherly love, relief 
and truth constitute a guide for his daily life and relations with his fel- 
low men. He and his estimable wife are both members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

In 1873 Mr. Rickman married Miss Ella Mills, a daughter of Lewis 
G. Mills, a lifelong farmer of Sumner county. Two children have been 
born to this marriage. Mattie L. is now the wife of H. C. Smith, of 
Nashville, and Roy M. is associated with his father in the milling business. 



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1354 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Nathan Green, LL.D. There is probably no better known name in 
the legal circles of the South than that of Judge Nathan Green, for 
fifty-seven years identified with the law department of Cumberland 
University, that illustrious institution where so many of America's most 
prominent men have received their legal education, his last twelve years' 
service being as dean of the law department. His father, for a number 
of years a professor of Cumberland University law department, and one 
of the most eminent jurists of Tennessee, was a supreme court judge 
twenty-five years, and was chancellor of this state for several years. Judge 
Grafton Green, only son of the subject of this sketch, is now one of the 
presiding judges on the supreme bench of Tennessee. For more than a 
half century Judge Nathan Green has had a large part in shaping the 
character of the legal talent of Tennessee, which is of an exceptionally 
high order, and for emulation he has given to the thousands of students 
that have come under his charge the example of an upright life, of talents 
employed to their fullest extent in useful, worthy and noble service 
for the advancement of humanity, and of a citizenship that in all its 
phases has marked him as one of America's noblemen. Now eighty-six 
years of age, the gloom of the deepening shadows of his life's twilight 
is dispelled by the consciousness of a life well spent and by the wealth 
of sincere and devoted friendships which are his. 

The Greens come of Virginia Revolutionary stock and have borne a 
prominent part in the military life of our country as well as in law, 
having been represented in the Revolution, the second struggle for 
American independence, the Mexican war and the Civil war. 

Judge Nathan Green was bom in Franklin county, Tennessee, Feb- 
ruary 19, 1827, a son of Nathan and Mary (Feild) Green. The father, a 
Virginian by nativity, was bom in 1792 and died in Lebanon, Tennes- 
see, in 1866. The mother, bom in North Carolina in 1792, was a daugh- 
ter of James Field, a lifelong resident of North Carolina, and her death 
occurred in 1849. The senior Nathan Green grew to manhoood in Vir- 
ginia and received his education there, including his preparation for 
the profession he followed throughout life and in which he became so 
eminent, that of law. He came to Tennessee in 1812 and it was not long 
afterward until he became chancellor of the state, subsequently serving 
from 1827 to 1852 as a judge of the supreme court of this state. He was 
yet filling that honorable position when he resigned to take a profes- 
sorship in the law department of Cumberland University, with which 
institution he was thereafter identified until his death. He was first a 
Whig and then a Democrat in i)olitical sentiment, was identified frater- 
nally with the Masonic order, and was a soldier in the war of 1812. 
He and his wife were both devoted members of the Cumberland Presby- 
terian church and he was also an elder of his church. Of the eight chil- 
dren that came to their union, our subject is the only one yet living. 
Their eldest son, one of the brave, aggressive and distinguished Confed- 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1355 

erate soldiers of the Civil war, is mentioned in the Confederate Military 
History as follows: 

**Brig.-6en. Thomas Green, beloved and honored by everybody as a 
man, the chevalier of Texas soldiery, whose training as a soldier was 
commenced at San Jacinto and was perfected as captain of cavalry in 
Indian warfare and at Monterey in Mexico, and whose flag floated in the 
ascendant in every battle in Texas, Louisiana and New Mexico where 
his sword was drawn, determined to capture the enemy's gunboats on 
Red river. In the attempt at Blair's Landing, April 12, 1864, his valu- 
able life was given to his country, on the banks of the river, while lead- 
ing his men to the onset. His name had been a household word in Texas, 
and his fame is^ still cherished in memory throughout the state that he 
honored in his life.'' Major-Qeneral Banks, commanding the Federal 
army during that engagement, in his report to General Sherman, said: 
''General Green was killed by the fire of the gunboats of the 12th; he 
was the ablest officer in their service." 

Thomas Green, the grandfather of him of whom we write, was also 
a native Virginian, a very wealthy planter of that state, and served in 
the patriot army during the Revolution. 

Judge Nathan Green was educated, in Cumberland University and 
was graduated from the liberal arts department in 1845, with high 
honors. In 1847 he was one of the first seven students to enter the law 
department of Cumberland University, this department being estab- 
lished Jan. 9, 1847, by Judge Abraham Caruthers, who resigned a seat on 
the State bench to accept the position. Judge Green graduated from the 
law school in 1849, and in 1845 his father. Judge N. Green, Sr., resigned 
a seat on the State bench and responded to an urgent call from Judge 
Caruthers to assist him with the work of the law department. Shbrtly 
thereafter in 1856 Lebanon's honored citizen was elected a professor 
of law in the law department, which position he has held continuously 
ever since, and today has the honor and distinction of being the oldest 
teachers in the state. The three gentlemen mentioned above continued 
as the faculty of the law department until the breaking out of the war 
in 1861. 

Judge Green was among the first to respond to the call of arms, and 
a braver and more courageous man never shouldered a musket than was 
he, and his war record is one any man would be proud of. He soon 
distinguished himself by his bravery and daring, and won immediate 
recognition from his superiors in rank. He was made an adjutant 
general and staff officer under Gen. A. P. Stewart during the early part 
of the war. During the latter part of the war he served as superintend- 
ent of the engineering works and came through the entire conflict 
unscathed. 



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1356 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Immediately after the close of the war Judge Green came back to 
Lebanon and to his great sorrow found his alma mater in ashes. The fine 
college building located in the southern part of Lebanon in the center of 
a large campus was used during the war as barracks for the soldiers. 
A Confederate soldier, who had attended the college, became incensed 
at it being occupied by negroes, filled one room with cedar rails one 
night and applied the torch, destroying the entire property. Undaunted 
by the great disaster that had befallen his alma mater, Judge Green 
immediately set about to re-establish the school, which he succeeded in 
doing under great difficulties and got together about twenty students, 
all of whom were either Confederate or Federal soldiers, and among that 
number was Judge Horace Lurton and Capt. R. P. McClain, a prominent 
member of the Lebanon bar here. 

In 1866 Judge Green, Sr., died and Hon. Henry Cooper succeeded to 
his position. Judge Cooper resigned in 1868 when Judge Robt. L. 
Caruthers was called to the position, and he, too, resigned a seat on the 
Supreme Bench. Judge Caruthers resigned in 1881 and died the fol- 
lowing year and was succeeded to the professorship in the law school by 
Dr. Andrew B. Martin, and he, together with Judge Green, has conducted 
the school continuously ever since. Judge Green is the oldest teacher 
in the State of Tennessee and has the distinction and honor of having 
taught more law students than any other living man. In numerous 
instances has he taught both the father and in after years his son. Cum- 
berland University has the honor of having had more men to graduate 
from its Law Department that have made themselves prominent and 
famous in the affairs of both Nation and State than any other institu- 
tioik in the country, and today its graduates are to be found in both 
branches of Congress and on the Supreme benches of Tennessee, Ala- 
bama, Florida, Texas, Arkansas, Missouri, North Carolina, Oregon and 
Montana. Judge Green was also chancellor of the university from 1873 
until he resigned from the position in 1900. Nature was kind to him in 
her bestowal of a most vigorous intellect and that faculty which grasps as 
it were by intuition, the salient points of any subject presented for con- 
sideration. He has always been a man of liberal and broad views, of 
genial disposition and generous impulses, and of spotless integrity. In 
all the relations of life he has honorably and faithfully performed his 
duty. In political affairs he has always been an adherent of the Demo- 
cratic party, and like his father, he has long been affiliated with the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. He has also attained prominence as a litterateur through 
the authorship of two books, **The Tall Man of Winton'' and ''Sparks 
from a Back Log,*' both of much literary merit and of large circulation. 

Judge Green has been twice married. In 1850 he wedded Miss Betty 
McClain, daughter of J. S. McClain, and of the children of this 
union three are living: Ella, the wife of Judge W. Caldwell, of West 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1357 

Tennessee; Mattie, who became Mrs. Reagan Houston, and resides in 
San Antonio, Texas; and Grafton Green, a graduate of Cumberland 
University, and who as judge of the supreme court of Tennessee is ably 
upholding the remarkable prestige of the family name for legal ability 
and attainment. The wife and mother died July 4, 1893. She was a 
valued member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. In 1902 Judge 
Green married Miss Blanche Woodward, who passed away in 1910. He 
is a member of the Presbyterian church, U. S. A., and is an elder of his 
church at Lebanon. 

Judge Green's old colonial home, one of the handsomest in Lebanon, 
was destroyed by fire several years ago, which came as a severe blow 
to him owing to the fact that many tender memories associated with the 
old building, which has since been replaced with a handsome modem 
brick bungalow. Judge Green is a lover of the beautiful, both in nature 
and life, and very fond of flowers, dahlias and sweet peas being his 
favorites, and his favorite pastime in the morning and afternoon is 
working his flowers in his flower garden near the house. 

The 1912 graduating law class presented the university with life-size 
portraits of both Judge Green and Dr. Martin, which were hung on either 
side of the stage at Caruthers Hall and between which hangs a life-size 
portrait of Judge Abraham Caruthers, founder of the Lebanon Law 
School, presented to the university by Judge Green a number of years 
ago. The young men of the 1913 law class recently presented Judge 
Green with a handsome silver loving cup on the occasion of the celebra- 
tion of his eighty-sixth birthday. On the same day the members of the 
Sunday school of the Presbyterian church surprised him with a delight- 
ful reception held in his honor in the main auditorium of the church. 

Such is the brief review of one of the most eminent and respected of 
Tennessee 's citizens. His life has been one of noble ambition and char- 
acter, of superior intellect and education fittingly applied in all his 
endeavors and has made a deep impress for noble manhood and unfalter- 
ing integrity upon the annals of Tennessee. In conclusion is quoted a 
paragraph that recently appeared in a Tennessee paper: 

Though Lebanon's most honored and revered citizen has already 
passed the eighty-sixth milestone in the path of life, yet to look at his 
erect and dignified bearing and manner both in public and private life, 
every movement of which bespeaks the refinement and bearing of a true 
Southern gentleman, one would easily judge him to be many years 
younger than he really is and for the past twenty years there has been 
no appreciable or noticeable lessening in his vigor and vitality, and his 
friends here and over the entire United States, who are legion, wish for 
him that the hourglass of life has yet many, many more years of life 
allotted him before it has run its course and that the days and hours of 
which may be filled with unalloyed happiness, pleasure and content- 
ment, which he so richly deserves. 



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1358 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Joseph E. Faust. A large number of the Tennessee pioneers came 
from Virginia. Among them were Joseph and Betsy Faust, who settled 
on a farm and there passed the remainder of their lives. They were of 
German extraction, industrious and frugal, and assisted in reclaiming 
the land from the wilderness. Their son, Joseph E. Faust, was bom in 
Wilson county, Tennessee, August 5, 1824, received such an education as 
the schools of that early day afforded, and learned the trade of mill- 
wright. His life was passed in Wilson, Smith and Macon counties, where 
he was regarded as a useful citizen and a measurably successful man, 
though he suffered severe losses from floods in 1865 and 1882. He was 
a Democrat in his political belief and a member of the Masonic fraternity. 
His death occurred in Macon county in April, 1905. He married Mary 
Kearley, who was born in Smith county, Tennessee, in 1838, the daughter 
of William Kearley, a prominent physician and farmer and one of the 
well-to-do men of that day. She died in October, 1912, at Lafayette. 
Seven children bom to Joseph E. and Mary (Kearley) Faust are still 
living, viz ; John B., a miller at Lafayette ; Ada, wife of W. L. Chamber- 
lain, of Lafayette; Thos. E., an attorney of Lafayette; Nettie, wife of 
James Loftis, of Cookville ; Dr. William D., who is practicing his profes- 
sion at Ada, Oklahoma; Joseph E., the immediate subject of this review; 
Oscar L., who is engaged in the lumber business at Memphis. 

Joseph E. Faust, son of Joseph E. and Mar>^ Faust, was born in 
Smith county, Tennessee, January 18, 1868. After attending the com- 
mon schools of Macon and Trousdale counties he matriculated in the law 
department of Cumberland University, where he was graduated with the 
class of 1890. Shortly after receiving his degree he began the practice 
of his profession at Hartsville, Tennessee, where he is still located. By 
close attention to his business and a conscientious discharge of his duties 
to his clients he has succeeded in building up a lucrative practice, which 
extends to all the state and Federal courts. While he has many friends 
among his brother attorneys, he has never formed a partnership with 
any one, preferring to conduct his cases in his own way. In this way 
he has developed a strong, self-reliant character that has placed him 
among the leading members of the local bar. 

Mr. Faust is a firm believer in the principles and policies of the Demo- 
cratic party, and in every campaign for several years he has rendered 
that party eflScient service as a public speaker. He has served three 
terms in the state legislature, where he was always on the alert with re- 
gard to measures that would further the interests of his constituents, 
and he has also filled the position of clerk of the chancery court. But 
in whatever capacity he has been called to serve — as lawyer, legislator or 
public official — ^he has never shirked his duty. Beginning life with small 
means, without the aid of influential friends or favoritism in any way, 
he has achieved success through his own efforts and a careful considera- 
tion of the rights of his fellow men. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1359 

Mr. Faust's fraternal relations are with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. In the latter order he has 
passed through the chairs and is a past chancellor. In church matters 
he has adopted the faith of his mother and holds membership in the Bap- 
tist church. 

In February, 1891, Mr. Faust married Miss Fannie Allan, daughter 
of Arch. Allan, a prominent citizen of Trousdale county, where he was 
engaged in the livery business. He served several terms as sheriff of 
the couuty and as township trustee, and was also engaged as a mail con- 
tractor. Mr. and Mrs. Faust are the parents of the following children : 
Allan, Lizzie, Rupert, Ethel Frances and Mary H. All are attending 
school except the eldest and youngest. 

Lytle Dalton. Back in the colonial days the English government 
gave a grant of land in Tennessee to Lord Dalton. This grant he trans- 
ferred to his sons, who settled in what is now Sumner county, and they 
became the founders of the Dalton family in Tennessee. About the be- 
ginning of the nineteenth century a man named Ball came from Virginia 
to Tennessee with his family. His son, Lytle Ball, who was born at Harts- 
ville in the year 1820, married Eliza Ann Holt, and this couple were 
the maternal grandparents of the subject of this sketch. Lytle Ball was 
a farmer all his life and for forty years held the office of constable. The 
paternal grandparents, R. C. and Mary S. (Carson) Dalton, were bom 
in Tennessee. The grandmother is still living near Hartsville at the age 
of ninety-four years, and is active for one of her age. J. R. Dalton, the 
father of Lytle Dalton, was born and reared in Trousdale county, Ten- 
nessee. During the Civil war he served for three years as a member of 
General Forrest's celebrated cavalry command, being twice wounded 
while in the service. At the close of the war he returned home and resumed 
his vocation of farmer. He married Agnes Ball, a native of Trousdale 
county, and to this union were born twelve children, eleven of whom 
are still living. In 1905 the parents removed to Oklahoma, where they at 
present reside, retired from active business cares and enjoying the fruits 
of their labors of former years. J. R. Dalton has been a lifelong Demo- 
crat in his political opinions, but was never an aspirant for public hon- 
ors. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Lytle Dalton was born near Hartsville, Tennessee, March 4, 1869, 
the day President Grant was inaugurated for the first time. He was 
educated in the public schools and at the Hartsville Masonic Institute, 
after which he taught for six years in the public schools. His work as a 
teacher commended him to the authorities, and in 1900 he was elected 
county superintendent, which office he held for six years, when he re- 
signed. By his own efforts he has achieved success in a financial way, 
and is universally recognized as **a man of affairs." He owns a fine 
farm of four hundred acres, as well as property in the city of Hartsville, 



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1360 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

holds stock in both the banks of that city, and is a director in the Bank of 
Hartsville. 

Upon arriving at his majority Mr. Dalton adopted the political faith 
of his honored father and cast his lot with the Democratic party. His 
fidelity to Democratic principles and his activity in winning victories for 
his party marked him as a leader, and in 1906 he was elected to the oflSce 
of county court clerk. It was this election that caused his resignation 
as county superintendent of schools. At the close of his first term as 
county clerk he was reelected and is now serving his second term. 
Whether as private citizen, teacher, superintendent of schools, or clerk 
of the court, Mr. Dalton has always been diligent and conscientious in the 
discharge of his duties, and his reelection was but the natural reward 
of his faithfulness and executive ability. Mr. Dalton is a Knight of 
Pythias and a past chancellor of his lodge. 

In 1905 he married Miss Ada, daughter of Henry Dalton, a farmer of 
Trousdale county, and they have two children — Lillian and Lois. Mr. 
and Mrs. Dalton are both members of the Christian church. 

Edwin S. Payne. Shakespeare tells us that '*Some men are born 
great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon 
them." Whatever degree of greatness or success that may have come to 
Edwin S. Payne has been the result of his own well directed efforts and 
the exercise of sound business judgment and sagacity, tie was born in 
that part of Sumner county, Tennessee, which now constitutes Trousdale 
county, April 30, 1844, a son of Edwin L. and Sallie D. (Mc All ester) 
Payne. His father was bom in Culpeper county, Virginia, in 1812, came 
with his parents to Tennessee in 1818 and passed the remainder of his life 
in that state, his death occurring in 1872. He was twice married. His 
first wife was a Miss Haynes, and to this union four children were born, 
all now deceased. After her death he married Sallie D. McAUester and 
this marriage was blessed with eight children, five of whom are yet living, 
the subject of this sketch being the second in the order of birth. The 
mother of these children was bom in Smith county, Tennessee, and died 
in Trousdale county, Tennessee. Mr. Payne knows but very little regard- 
ing his paternal ancestry further than that his father was a Lifelong 
Democrat in his political affiliations and for a number of years held the 
office of magistrate. He was a quiet, unostentatious farmer all his life, 
and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, his second wife having 
been a Baptist. Garland McAUester, Mr. Payne's maternal grandfather, 
was an early settler of Tennessee. He married a Miss Flower. Both 
grandfathers were slaveholders prior to the Civil war. 

Edwin S. Payne's early life was that of the average farmer's son. 
The summer months were passed in assisting in the farm work, and in 
the winter seasons he attended the country schools, where by close ap- 
plication to his studies he managed to acquire a good, practical education. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1361 

At the age of seventeen years he enlisted in Company D, Second Ten- 
nessee Confederate Cavalry, and served with that organization for nearly 
four years, taking part in the battles of Shiloh, luka, and a number of 
other engagements. He was paroled at Gainesville, Alabama, May 11, 
1865, and returned home to build up his shattered fortunes. At that 
time his total capital consisted of $1.35, but with courage and determina- 
tion he went to work upon the farm, where he continued for two years. 
He then accepted a position as clerk in a store and followed that occupa- 
tion for two years, at the end of which time he went into a small store 
with his father. Here he laid the foundation of his fortune. Prom that 
time to the present he has been interested in mercantile pursuits, and 
for forty-three years he has occupied the same site at Castalian Springs, 
where he has a large and well assorted stock of general merchandise, and 
is regarded as one of the successful merchants of that section. He is 
also extensively interested in farming operations. His first purchase of 
land was that of one and three-fourths acres, but he now owns an excel- 
lent farm of 550 acres in one body, having recently sold two hundred 
acres. Mr. Payne was for several years president of the People's 
National Bank, and is now one of the directors of that institution. 
He holds stock in the Montgomery & Moore Company and the Armistead- 
McKinney Company, of Nashville, and is also one of the stockholders 
in the Willard Tobacco Company. In addition to these holdings he 
owns property in the city of Gallatin, Tennessee, and is considered by 
those who know him best to be one of the wealthiest men in Trousdale 
county. In the accumulation of his fortune he has been guided by 
principles of fairness and square dealing, believing that ^'A good name 
is greater than great riches.'* 

Mr. Payne is a member of the Masonic fraternity and has been hon- 
ored by being elected worshipful master of his lodge. He is a stanch 
supporter of the Democratic party and its principles, but has never been 
an aspirant for public office. 

In 1872 Mr. Payne was united in marriage with Miss Ellen, daughter 
of Baxter Lipscom, one of the pioneers of Sumner county, Tennessee, 
and to this union were born four children, two of whom are yet living, 
Thomas S., residing in Nashville, and Henry C. in California. Mrs. 
Payne died November 27, 1897, and on April 24, 1900, Mr. Payne married 
for his second wife Mrs. John T. Reynolds, who was Miss Lizzie Martin, 
of Maury county, Tennessee. Three children have come to bless this 
second marriage. Allie May and Lewis Carr are attending school, and 
Frayola F., three years old, is the baby of the family. Mrs. Payne is a 
member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. 

Humphrey Bate, M. D. For a period of about forty-five years Sum- 
ner county has had the services in professional capacity of a father and 
son named Bate. The family name has many other distinctions to make 
it notable in local history, and in good citizenship, in business and 



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1362 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

military life the members of the family have always made good records. 
The present Dr. Bate well upholds the high standing of the family, and 
is one of the leadiig practitioners of medicine in the county. 

Dr. Humphrey Bate was born in Sumner county, May 25, 1875, a 
son of Humphrey H. and Nancy (Simpson) Bate. The maternal grand- 
father Simpson came from his native state of North Carolina into Sum- 
ner county, Tennessee, as one of the early settlers. The paternal grand- 
father, Humphrey Bate, also came from North Carolina, and spent most 
of his active life on a farm in Sumner county. He had the distinction 
of being the first master of the Masonic lodge at Hartsville. 

The education begun in the common schools of Sumner county. Dr. 
Bate continued in the University of Tennessee and was graduated in 
medicine from the University of Nashville in 1897. His medical prac- 
tice began soon after, but in 1898, at the outbreak of the Spanish- 
American war, he entered the United States army as surgeon and con- 
tinued until the close of the war. All his time is devoted to the demands 
of a large and lucrative practice. He is a member of the county and 
state medical societies, and has a nice farm property near his residence 
at Castalian Springs. 

Dr. Bate was married in 1898 to Miss Gertrude Brown, a daughter 
of C. H. Brown, who is a retired farmer now living in Gallatin. Dr. 
Bate by his first wife had two children, namely: Nell and Edna, both 
of whom live in Gallatin. ^Irs. Bate, the mother of these daughters, 
died in 1909. She was a member of the Christian church. In June, 
1910. Dr. Bate was united in marriage with Miss Ethel Hesson, a 
daughter of Harvey Hesson, who was bom in Smith county, this state. 
By this marriage there is one child, Alcyone. Mrs. Bate has member- 
ship with the Baptist church. Dr. Bate is a Democrat, but takes no 
active part in politics. 

Andrew J. Sparkman. The organizer of the Farmers & ^lerchants 
Bank of Bethpage, of which he is now cashier, Mr. Sparkman is one 
of the vigorous and enterprising business men of Sumner county. He 
has been farmer, banker and public official, and his career up to middle 
life contains all the elements of substantial success. 

On the paternal side the Sparkman family originated in Ireland, 
where the great-grandfather of the Bethpage banker was bom. Coming 
from that country, he settled first in North Carolina and then in Ten- 
nessee. The grandfather, whose name was George Sparkman, was born 
in North Carolina, whence he came to Tennessee with his parents and 
spent his life in this state as a farmer. During his time and among 
his contemporaries, he was one of the wealthiest men in Van Buren 
county. The largest slave owner in his section, he used their labor in 
the cultivation of his broad estate of a thousand acres. Besides raising 
all the crops of the fields, he specialized in stock. His family consisted 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1363 

of ten or twelve children, and to each of them as they grew up he gave 
a fine estate, so that each one was comfortably fixed at the beginning 
of his career. On the maternal side the grandfather was Solomon Spark- 
man, of North Carolina, whence he came to Tennessee at an early day, 
and the maiden name of his wife was Goddard. She attained to the 
great age of one hundred and two years. 

The father of Mr. Sparkman was long a successful farmer in Van 
Buren county. His name was Solomon Sparkman, and he was bom 
in Van Buren county in 1842, and died in 1904. His wife, Martha Jane 
(Sparkman) Sparkman, was bom in 1844 and died in 1907. During 
the Civil war he favored the Confederate cause, but instead of going 
to the front on actual military duty he remained at home and assisted 
in the manufacture of ammunition, which was just as necessary to the 
service as that of carrying a musket. He and his wife were parents of 
eight children, four of whom are now living, named: Moses, Andrew, 
Geoi^e and Wiley. The old homestead in Van Buren county is still 
owned by three of these sons, who bought out the other heirs. The 
parents were both members of the Baptist church, and in politics the 
father was an independent. 

Andrew J. Sparkman was bom in Van Buren county, Tennessee, 
March 20, 1872. Reared in the country, at an early age he determined 
to acquire a better than ordinary education. In order to pay his way 
through Burritt College at Spencer, where he was graduated in 1897, 
he worked for some time as janitor, this service paying his tuition there. 
He also taught school for four years, and then for a year was at work 
on a farm. His next promotion in life was his election to the office of 
county court clerk of Van Buren county, a position in which he rendered 
efficient service for eight years. From this state he then moved out to 
California, from there came back as far as Oklahoma, where he bought 
a farm. Then in 1909, locating at Gallatin, he purchased the Judge 
B. D. Bell place. In the same year he bought the old James Head farm, 
which he sold in 1910. The latter year he undertook the organization 
at Bethpage of the Farmers & Merchants Bank, of which he has since 
been cashier. This is one of the solid institutions of Sumner county, 
and has had a very prosperous career during its first two or three years 
existence. There is at the present time a surplus of $10,000 with profits 
of $2,500, and the deposits amount to more than $40,000. During his 
residence in East Tennessee Mr. Sparkman dealt to a considerable 
extent in coal lands, and his career has been a money-making one in 
nearly every venture which he has taken up. 

He is active in Democratic politics, although he is at the present 
time not an aspirant for any official honors. His fraternal affiliation 
is with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, while he and his wife 
are members of the Baptist church. 

In 1900 occurred his marriage to Miss Myra Safley, a daughter of 



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1364 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Lawson Safley, who was a farmer of Warren county for many years 
and in connection with his agriculture was a minister of the Baptist 
church. 

Richard C. Owen. One of the representative business men of Harts- 
ville is Richard C. Owen, who is the proprietor of a large tobacco manu- 
factory and an active public spirited citizen. He is one of the fourth 
generation to reside in Tennessee, his great-grandfather having come 
from North Carolina at an early date and settled in Williamson county. 
His grandfather, Richard C. Owen, for whom he was named, and his 
father, Robert Owen, were both bom in Tennessee and there passed 
their entire lives. Robert Owen was bom in Williamson county in 
1840. He was wounded at the battle of Shiloh and after some time in 
the hospital returned to his farm in Rutherford county, where he became 
interested in the tobacco business. He was successful in his business 
ventures and left an estate valued at some $50,000 upon his death in 
1909. He married Miss Powell Dobson, a daughter of Baker Dobson, 
both she and her father having been born in Williamson county, Ten- 
nessee, and to this union were bom five children, two deceased, the 
subject of this sketch being the second in order of birth. Henrietta 
married Robert Brown and lives in Rutherford county, Tennessee, and 
Mary married Condon Covington and resides in Williamson county. 
The mother of these children is a member of the Baptist church, to 
which her husband also belonged during his lifetime. He was also a 
member of the Masonic fraternity. 

Richard C. Owen was bom in Rutherford county, Tennessee, July 
28, 1870. He was educated at Eagleville, Tennessee, and upon arriving 
at manhood embarked in the tobacco business, which he has successfully 
followed from that time to the present. The Owen family is of Welsh 
descent, and from his Welsh ancestors Mr. Owen has inherited those 
traits of industry and foresight which have contributed in no small 
degree to his financial success. For several years he was at the head of 
a tobacco company at Eagleville, but in 1904 he removed to Hartsville, 
where he established his present f actoiy. ' Here he uses from four hun- 
dred thousand to five hundred thousand pounds of leaf tobacco every 
year and places upon the market eight different brands of manufactured 
tobacco. Every process of manufacture is constantly under his personal 
supervision and. great care is exercised to see that his goods are kept up 
to the proper standard. The result of this policy is a large number of 
satisfied customers and a steadily increasing patronage. Mr. Owen 
classes himself as an independent Democrat politically, though he has 
never been an active political worker. He keeps himself well informed, 
however, on all questions relating to public policies, and always does 
his duty, as he sees it, on election day. His fraternal relations are with 
the Knights of Pythias and he is a member of the Baptist church. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1365 

In 1895 Mr. Owen married Miss Anna Bell, daughter of Leonidas 
D. Bell, a successful fanner of Williamson county and a veteran of the 
great Civil war. To this union have been born six children — Robert, 
Hainey, Carter, Dean, Roy and Ralph — all at home with their parents 
or attending school. Mrs. Owen holds membership in the Christian 
church. 

John E. Edgerton. It has fallen to the lot of John E. Edgerton to 
carry on the business of the establishment founded by his brother, Dr. 
H. K. Edgerton, in Lebanon, Tennessee, in 1909, and he is conducting 
the activities of the plant of the Lebanon Woolen MiUs with a progress- 
iveness and enterprise that bids fair to make it one of the solid and sub- 
stantial manufacturing concerns of the South. Mr. Edgerton is a native 
North Carolinian, born in Johnston county, on October 2, 1879, and 
is the son of Gabriel G. and Harriet (Copeland) Edgerton, both of whom 
were born in North Carolina. 

Mr. G. G. Edgerton was bom in 1842, and passed his life in that 
state, where he was all his days occupied with farming interests and 
there died in 1897. He was a son of William Edgerton, also a native 
of the state of North Carolina, and a Quaker, who was interested in 
the manufacture of cotton and in farming, and was a man of some posi- 
tion in his time. Gabriel and Harriet Edgerton reared a family of nine 
children, of which number seven are yet living. 

As a boy in the home of his parents,' John E. Edgerton attended the 
common schools of North Carolina, and later entered Vanderbilt Univer- 
sity, where he took his B. A. degree in 1902 and his master's degree in 
1903. Thereafter he taught one year at Castle Heights, in Lebanon, 
after which he went to Memphis, and taught one year in the University 
school at that place. His next move took him to Columbia, where he 
founded the Columbia Military Academy at that place, and there he 
remained for seven years. His brother. Dr. Edgerton, had in 1909 
founded the Lebanon Woolen Mills, with a capital stock of $100,000, and 
was the first president of that concern, and, indeed, its only president 
thus far, for he still maintains that important relation to the plant. 
In 1912 ^Ir. Edgerton was called from his work in Columbia ^Military 
Academy to assume the duties of secretary, treasurer and general man- 
ager of the new and flourishing enterprise, and he is now the incumbent 
of those offices. The concern has experienced a steady and luxuriant 
growth in the short time of its existence thus far, and gives promise 
of taking a high rank in manufacturing circles in the South, at its present 
rate of development. Its trade comes from all sections of the United 
States, and the output of the factory is being constantly increased to 
meet the demands of the woolen blanket market. 

Mr. Edgerton and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church South. He is a member of his college fraternity, the Kappa 

Vol. V— 11 



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1366 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Sigma, and is also affiliated with the Masonic order. He is a Democrat, 
but finds little time to devote to the politics of the county, the demands 
of the business of which he is so important a factor making drafts upon 
his time and energies that permit of no dallying with outside interests. 
On December 15, 1909, Mr. Edgerton was united in marriage with 
Miss Harriet Figuers, the daughter of T. N. Figuers, a successful mer- 
chant of Columbia, Tennessee, and one of the more prominent men of 
that city. 

James H. Ferguson. Among the fine country homesteads in Mont- 
gomery county, up near the Kentucky line, is that of James H. Fer- 
guson, who for thirty years or more has been one of the prosperous 
producers of the staple crops of this locality and a citizen of standing 
and influence in his community. 

Mr. Ferguson was bom in Todd county, Kentucky, August 5, 1850, 
a son of John D. and Nancy M. (Meriwether) Ferguson. Both the 
Fergusons and Meriwethera have been families of distinction and worth 
in Todd county for many years. Robert Ferguson, the paternal grand- 
father, who married a Miss Babcock, was a native of Scotland, who early 
in the last century came to America and lived in Massachusetts and 
Virginia and finally in Kentucky, where he died. He was a minister of 
the Christian church, and his family have furnished several valued 
servants to that denomination. One of his sons, Jesse B. Ferguson, 
gained a reputation throughout the South for his power as a preacher. 
John D. Ferguson, the father, was also a minister of the Christian church. 
He was bom in Massachusetts in 1816, accompanied his parents to 
Virginia, where he was liberally educated in the William and Mary 
College, and then took up the work of the church, to which he gave 
most of his years until his death. He also conducted a farm during 
his residence in Todd county. His first wife, Nancy Meriwether, was a 
daughter of Charles N. Meriwether, a Virginian who spent most of his 
active life in Todd county, Kentucky, where he was a wealthy farmer 
and stock-raiser. Nancy Ferguson had two children, James H. and 
Carrie D., who married Douglas Meriwether, and resides in Kentucky. 
The father's second marriage was to L. Vaughn, and of their three chil- 
dren only one is living, R. V. Ferguson, of Todd county. John D. Fer- 
guson died in 1892, and his first wife passed away in 1857. 

After getting the fundamentals of an education in the common schools 
of his native county, James H. Ferguson took up farming as a regular 
vocation, and as he has made it a business and devoted the best energies 
of his lifetime to it his success has been more than ordinary. In 1880 
he moved to Montgomery county, Tennessee, where he acquired five hun- 
dred and twenty acres. Every year since then his tobacco, com, wheat 
and hogs have been no small contribution to the productive resources 
of this county and have brought him a regular revenue. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1367 

In 1877 Mr. Ferguson married Miss Parthena Kimbrough. Her 
father, Garth Kimbrough, a native of Virginia, settled in Tennessee 
many years ago, and was one of the successful farmers of the state up 
to the time of his death. Mr. Ferguson and wife have four children: 
Mildred C, at home; John D., a resident of Nebraska; Kittie, the wife 
of T. M. Anderson, who lives on Mr. Ferguson's farm; and James, a 
daughter, living at home. Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson are members of the 
Christian church, and he is affiliated with the Elks Lodge No. 601. He 
has always taken an active interest in local Democratic politics, but 
has never sought any official honors for herself. 

William Edgar Johnson. One of the live, wide-awake and progres- 
sive business men of Lewis county, Tennessee, is William Edgar John- 
son, of Hohenwald, mayor of the town and a successful contractor and 
builder there who is a worthy representative of Tennessee's energetic 
younger generation of business men and industrial workers. He was 
born in Perry county, this state, June 23, 1878, and received his public 
school education in Maury and Hickman counties, later attending the 
Dickson Normal College. Since entering upon his independent busi- 
ness career he has been identified with various enterprises, was engaged 
for a time in the mercantile business at Hohenwald and also in the 
planing mill business at the same place, and the while was engaged more 
or less in building and contracting, to which line of business endeavor 
he now gives his whole attention. He is interested in his work from a 
personal business standpoint and also because he takes a real pride in 
what is accomplished in that manner toward the material upbuilding 
and development of his town and community and he very loyally claims 
that Hohenwald is one of the livest, most progressive towns of 
Tennessee. This same spirit is evinced in his activities as mayor of 
Hohenwald, to which office he was elected in July, 1912, for any project 
that means the progress and profiqperity of the town receives his cordial 
and hearty support. Mr. Johnson himself owns several fine buildings 
in Hohenwald, among them being a fine concrete business block, and 
he is also heavily interested in real estate in Lewis county. 

He comes from an energetic and enterprising family that has held 
a worthy place in the business and industrial circles of this section of 
Tennessee for upwards of a century. Andrew Jackson Johnson came 
into Tennessee from his native North Carolina about 1820 and 
located in Maury county, where he married Median Cook. He was 
a tanner by trade and had a farm and tan yard in Maury county, from 
whence he later removed to Hickman county, continuing in the latter 
location to be extensively engaged in tanning. He was a Confederate 
soldier during the Civil war and while in that service was captured by 
the Federals and held a prisoner for some time. After his discharge as 
a prisoner he went to Arkansas to investigate some properties he owned 



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1368 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

there and while in that state, which was in 1865, he died of pneumonia at 
the age of sixty. He and his wife were the parents of four children, the 
youngest of whom was William Brantly Johnson, the father of William 
Edgar, bom in Maury county, Tennessee in 1850. William Brantly 
Johnson grew to manhood in Maury county, receiving there but limited 
educational opportunities as the public school advantages of that day 
were not such as are afforded the present youth of Tennessee. After his 
marriage he was engaged in the mercantile business at Sawdust Valley 
and at Beardston, Perry county, later removing to West Tennessee, 
where he continued in the same line of business. From there he went 
to Texas and took up farming, but subsequently returned to Tennessee 
and passed away in Hohenwald in 1900, at the age of fifty. Politically 
he was a Democrat, and fraternally he was affiliated with the ^lasonic 
order. Both he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church South. The latter, who was Miss JMartha Pipkin before her 
marriage, was born in Maury county, September 9, 1858, and is yet 
living, being now a resident of Texas. To these parents were born six 
children, of whom William Edgar was second in birth and the eldest son 
and of whom five are now living, namely: William Edgar, our sub- 
ject ; Howard, now a resident of Texas ; Jesse, who is located at Hohen- 
wald; Burton, now residing in California; and Maude, whose home is 
in Texas. 

William Edgar Johnson was married September 10, 1902, to Miss 
Lillian Williams, a daughter of Sep Williams, of Montgomery county, 
Tennessee. To this union have been bom three sons, Malcolm, Edward 
and Philip. Mr. Johnson is a Democrat in political views, and in a 
fraternal way is associated as a member of the Hohenwald Lodge No. 
607 Free and Accepted Masons and of Hohenwald Lodge No. 293 Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Dr. Howard K. Edgerton, of Lebanon, Tennessee, one of the most 
prominent and popular physicians of Wilson county, is a native of North 
Carolina but has spent full twenty years in Lebanon in the useful and 
noble work of his profession. His value to his community is not limited 
to that of his medical ability, however, for he is also identified with the 
commercial life of Lebanon and is recognized as one of the town's most 
public-spirited and useful citizens. On the side of his paternal progeni- 
tors Dr. Edgerton is of English lineage and is descended from May- 
flower ancestry, three of the Edgertons having been passengers on that 
famous ship. With the other colonists these immigrants first settled in 
Massachusetts but later removed to Connecticut, and from thence mem- 
bers of the family migrated South and established the North Carolina 
branch of the family. 

Dr. Edgerton was bom in North Carolina on October 22, 1865, a 
son of Gabriel G. and Harriett (Copeland) Edgerton. The father, born 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1369 

in North Carolina in 1842, passed his life in Johnson county, that state, 
as a farmer, in which pursuit he was quite successful, and passed away 
there in 1896. He was a stalwart Democrat in political belief and for 
a number of years was a commissioner of Johnson county. He was a 
son of William Edgerton, a North Carolinian by birth and a Quaker 
who spent his business career as a farmer and cotton manufacturer 
and was a man of substance for his day. Harriett (Copeland) Edger- 
ton, born in 1844 in North Carolina, was also of English descent. She 
departed life in 1906. Both parents were devoted members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church South. 

Of their family of nine children. Dr. Edgerton was eighth in order 
of birth and is one of seven yet living. He received his earlier educa- 
tion in Guilford county, North Carolina and made his professional pre- 
paration at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, from the medi- 
cal department of which he was graduated in 1889. For the first three 
years thereafter, or until 1892, he practiced in North Carolina; then 
he came to Lebanon, Tennessee, where twenty years have now been 
spent in the earnest, attentive and skillful application of his medical 
knowledge. As a physician he excels, has reaped the reward of a most 
successful practitioner, and is recognized as of the foremost rank of 
his profession in this section of Tennessee. Dr. Edgerton has builded 
his success out of his own energies and ability and the lucrative prac- 
tice he commands and the very comfortable estate he has accumulated 
have come to him by no magician's wand but represent the rewards of 
his own merit. He is a member of the Wilson county and the Tennessee 
State Medical Societies and of the American Medical Association. 

On January 1, 1890, he was married to Miss Willie Pate, daughter of 
Stephen Pate. Mr. Pate, a native and for years a farmer in Putnam 
county, Tennessee, now resides with Dr. and Mrs. Edgerton. He is a 
Confederate veteran of the Civil war and gave four years of loyal service 
to support the cause of the Southland. The family circle of Dr. and 
Mrs. Edgerton has been broadened and brightened by the advent of 
two children, Lucile and Howard, both of whom are now attending school. 
Mrs. Edgerton is a member of the Christian church, while Dr. Edgerton 
is a Methodist. Politically he is a Democrat. In a business way he holds 
a large interest in the woolen mills at Lebanon being president of the 
Lebanon Woolen Mills, and also has extensive real estate holdings there. 
He and his family enjoy one of the most beautiful homes of Lebanon. 

Amzi W. Hooker. Conspicuous among the foremost business men 
of Lebanon, Tennessee, is Amzi W. Hooker, president of the Lebanon 
National Bank and an influential citizen of this community in other 
than business relations. He is a college man, a graduate of law, ener- 
getic, capable and resourceful, a representative of that type of citizen 



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1370 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

that not only sustains the prosperity of a commonwealth but pushes its 
development. 

Bom at Lexington, Mississippi, December 25, 1865, Mr. Hooker is 
a son of Judge John J. and Catharine (Beall) Hooker, both natives 
of Mississippi. The mother, bom in 1833, was a daughter of Otho Beall 
and passed away in 1866, leaving two sons: John J. Hooker, now 
engaged in the railroad business in Mississippi, and Amzi, who was 
then but an infant. Judge John J. Hooker, the father, was bom in 
1823 and died in his native state in 1873. He was educated in 
Mississippi, was admitted to the bar when about twenty-five years of 
age and passed a very successful career in law, accumulating a large 
estate from the remunerations of his professional labors. For a number 
of years he served as a chancery judge. After the death of his first 
wife he contracted a second marriage and to that union was bom a 
daughter, Eva B., who is now Mrs. S. S. Hudson, of Vicksburg, 
Mississippi. Mr. Hudson is one of the prominent men of his state and 
was formerly state's attorney of Mississippi. Both parents of Mr. 
Hooker were devout members of the Baptist church and Judge Hooker 
took a leading part in the work of that denomination in Mississippi. 
He was of an open-hearted, charitable disposition and substantially 
supported his religious sentiment by large donations of money for church 
work. In political belief and adherency he was a Democrat. 

Arazi W. Hooker spent his boyhood in Mississippi and in a prepara- 
tory school there he laid the foundation for his subsequent collegiate 
training. After two years of study in Richmond College, Richmond, 
Virginia, he entered the University of Mississippi and concluded the 
junior year in the latter institution. He then took a course in a busi- 
ness college at Cleveland, Ohio, and following that he matriculated at 
Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tennessee, where he completed a 
course in law and was graduated in June, 1887. Instead of becoming a 
law practitioner, however, he engaged in the general insurance business 
and continued in that line ten years. He then embarked in the lumber 
business and has continued his identification with this line of business 
to the present time, his lumber sales extending all over this section of 
the state. As previously mentioned, he is president of the Lebanon 
National Bank, one of the solid and popular financial institutions of 
this section of the state, and he is also a part owner of the interests of 
the Castle Heights Training School at Lebanon and has extensive real 
estate holdings. With keen business acumen Mr. Hooker has employed 
his inheritance, both in the way of mental traits and of money, to the 
best of advantage so that what he has accumulated represents the rewards 
of his own ability and endeavors. 

Mr. Hooker has been twice married. His first marriage occurred 
in June, 1887, and united him to Miss Gertrude Kirkpatrick, who was 
bom in Lebanon and resided there until her death in 1894, when she 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1371 

left a daughter, Eatherine. She was a member of the Presbyterian 
church. In 1901 Mr. Hooker married Alice, daughter of Judge W. H. 
Williamson, a prominent attorney of Lebanon. Mrs. Hooker's mother, 
prior to her marriage to Judge Williamson, was the widow of Gen. John 
Hunt Morgan, the famed raider and Confederate soldier of the Civil 
war. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Hooker has been born one son, John 
J. Hooker, now attending school. Both are members of the Presbyterian 
church and Mr. Hooker is- the elder of his church and is secretary of the 
board of trustees of Cumberland University. Fraternally he is aflSliated 
with the Knights of Pythias. 

W. P. Barton. Although now practically retired from active life, 
and giving most of his time to his farm, W. P. Barton, of Mount Juliet, 
Tennessee, led an active professional life for many years. As one of 
the most prominent physicians in the various localities in which he 
practiced he attained a high standing in his profession and became 
so skilled in diagnosis and the cure of disease that his services were 
in constant demand and he made a fortune in his professional career. 
Dr. Barton is now content to rest, or rather to lead a less strenuous life. 
His interest in public affairs remains unabated and his opinions, ripened 
by contact and knowledge of many kinds of humanity, are always lis- 
tened to with the greatest respect, for he has gained wisdom with the 
passing years. 

W. P. Barton was bom in Wilson county, Tennessee, on the 12th 
of May, 1856, the son of J. W. and Sarah C. (Neal) Barton, both of 
whom were bom in Tennessee. J. W. Barton was bom in 1819, and 
grew up in the county where he was bom, receiving his education in 
the country schools. He taught for a few terms and then settled down 
to farming, in which occupation he spent all of his life. He owned 
a few slaves and had a good farm, and was accounted one of the success- 
ful men of the county. He married Sarah C. Neal on the 11th of March, 
1852, she being the daughter of Seth Jordan Neal and Frances (Kimbro) 
Neal, who were both bom in Rutherford county, Tennessee, and spent 
their entire lives on a farm in their native state. Seven children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Barton, of whom five are now living, W. P. 
Barton being the third in order of birth. All of the children live in 
Wilson county, and are all successfully engaged in farming. Mrs. 
Barton is living with her soft, W. P., having reached the venerable age 
of eighty-five. The father died in 1910, at the age of ninety-one. Both 
of the parents belonged to the Baptist church, and his political aflSlia- 
tions were with the Know-Nothing party when that party first came 
into existence, but he afterward became a Democrat. The father of 
J. W. Barton, was Stephen P. Barton, and his mother was Ellen (Baird) 
Barton, both of whom were natives of North Carolina. They came into 



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1372 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Tennessee and settled on a farm in Wilson county, about 1800, and 
here they lived during the remainder of their lives. 

"W. P. Barton received his first education in the country schools 
and then was sent to Mount Juliet, Tennessee, for a course in private 
instruction under T. H. Freeman. He was prepared for college under 
the tuition of this man, and entering Vanderbilt University was grad- 
uated from the institution in 1882. Going thence to the University of 
Tennessee he completed the course and was graduated from there in 
1885. In 1893 he received a degree from the University of Nashville. 
Most of his studies had been in the scientific or medical field and after 
leaving college he began the practice of medicine. He first located at 
Silver Springs, Tennessee, and practiced there for three years. Then 
he moved to Texas and was located for a time at Fate, later removing to 
Roy City. He was very successful in his practice here and made a 
small sized fortune. In 1895 he moved back to Wilson county and gave 
up his practice. He has not been able to escape entirely from the duties 
of a physician for a number of his friends simply will not consent to 
having any one ^Ise attend them when they are ill. He owns four hun- 
dred and fifty acres of land comprising his home farm, besides two 
hundred acres nearby, also three thousand eight hundred acres in 
Rockwall, Collin, Hunt and Deafsmith counties, Texas, and is worth 
about one hundred thousand dollars. 

Mr. Barton and his family are members of the Baptist cburch, and 
in politics he is an independent Democrat. He takes much interest 
in fraternal affairs, belonging to the Masons, in which order he is a 
Royal Arch Mason. 

On the 19th of December, 1889, Mr. Barton married Lou IMay Mc- 
Dowell, but she only lived a few months, dying on June 29, 1890. In 
February, 1895, Mr. Barton married again, his second wife being 
Gela Curd, a daughter of Dr. J. M. Curd, who lives in Wilson county. 
She died May 5, 1897, leaving two children; Lou Ellen, who lives at 
home and W. P. Barton, who is at present attending the Webb School 
at Bell Buckle, Tennessee. 

Mr. Barton began life with little or nothing, but with the determina- 
tion to succeed, and considering that the first step along the road to 
success was the acquiring of a good education, he saved rigorously in 
order to make this possible, teaching school part of the time to pay for 
his medical education. He feels that the time and money was well 
spent and certainly no life could be better proof than his that an educa- 
tion means success, provided it is used in the right way. 

Rupus P. McClain. The legal career of Rufus P. McClain, of 
Lebanon, covers the long period of forty-five years and has been of that 
character that he has long been recognized as one of the strongest and 
ablest members of the Wilson county bar and as one of the foremost 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1373 

men of his profession in this section of Tennessee. He holds a no less 
honorable standing as a citizen, has represented this county in the state 
legislature, and through different other professional and public serv- 
ices and an upright walk in life has become one of the best known and 
highly regarded men of Wilson county. It is his native county, the* 
date of his birth being February 28, 1838, and the whole of the nearly 
three-quarters of a century since then, except while he was serving 
the Southland as a soldier of the **gray," has been passed in the vicin- 
ity where he was born. His parents, John A. and Minerva (Ross) 
McClain, also were both natives of Wilson county, the former's birth 
having occurred in 1801 and that of the latter in 1808. John A. Mc- 
Clain passed his career as a farmer and was very successful in that 
pursuit, being the owner of a fine estate of 400 acres at the time of his 
death in 1866. His wife survived him two years, joining him in death 
in 1868. They reared nine of the ten children bom to their union 
and of this family six are yet living, the subject of this sketch being 
the fourth in the family in order of birth. John A. ^IcClain was a 
Whig in politics until the breaking up of that party, after which he 
was a loyal adherent of the Democratic party. Four of his sons, Wil- 
liam A., Rufus P., Henry Harrison and John Bell, fought during the 
Civil war to sustain the Confederacy. He was a member of Cumber- 
land Presbyterian church. William McClain, his father, was a native 
of North Carolina and passed from the Old North state with the early 
tide of emigration to Tennessee, settling in Wilson county, where he 
became an extensive farmer and large slave holder. The family was 
originally of Irish lineage. Minerva Ross McClain, the mother, was a 
daughter of Allen Ross, also a North Carolinian, who came to this state 
in an early day and participated in the warfare against the Indians 
that then were in this locality and menaced the settlers. He lived to be 
over ninety ears of age and reared a family of twelve children. 

Rufus P. McClain was brought up in Wilson county and was grad- 
uated from the literary department of Cumberland University in 1859. 
In 1861 the Civil war opened and, as previously mentioned, he and 
three of his brothers entered the Confederate service, Rufus P. becoming 
a member of Hatton's regiment, which was assigned to Archer's brigade, 
Hiirs divison of the Army of Northern Vii^nia, and fought under the 
peerless *' Stonewall'' Jackson. This was one of the bravest regiments 
of the Confederate army and saw long, hard and active service. Its 
opening engagement was at Seven Pines and it participated in the series 
of battles from Warrenton ford to Shepherdstown, including the cap- 
ture of Harper's Ferry,, and it afterward fought at Sharpsburg, 
Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness campaign 
and in many other battles of lesser note. Mr. McClain entered the army 
as a private and was successively promoted to be corporal, quarter- 
master and finally paymaster for Hill's division, surrendering with his 



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1374 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

remaining comrades at Appomattox in 1865. On returning to Tennessee 
he took up the study of law in Cumberland University and was grad- 
uated from the law course in 1867. He then commenced the practice of 
his profession in Lebanon and from that time to the present has been 
extensively engaged in professional labors, his practice extending to all 
the courts and establishing for him the reputation of an able, conscien- 
tious and successful lawyer. He is and has been for some time attorney 
for the Nashville, Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway Company. He 
served as clerk of the county court four years, as clerk and master in 
equity in the Wilson county court eight years, and sat as special judge 
of the circuit court twelve months. His public service has also included 
one term in the state legislature as the representative of Wilson county, 
his services in that body being of a character alike honorable to him- 
self and satisfactory to his constituents. A first class business man 
also, he has accumulated a very comfortable estate and is a stockholder 
and a director in the American National Bank at Lebanon. Another 
prominent citizen of this name was Josiah S. McClain, an uncle of Ruf us 
P., who served as county court clerk forty years and was one of the 
best known men of Wilson county. 

In 1867 Mr. McClain was united in marriage to Miss Hester Mac- 
Kenzie, daughter of Alexander MacKenzie, who was a native of Scotland 
and died in Nashville, Tennessee. Mrs. McClain passed away August 
15, 1910. To this union came four children: Jennie M., now Mrs. 
Joseph Anderson, of Chattanooga, Tennessee; Minnie, who became Mrs. 
Ewing Graham and resides at West Palm Beach, Florida; Hester, who 
became the wife of Joseph Brown and resides in Chattanooga, Ten- 
nessee; and Alexander M. McClain, who is a traveling salesman. Mr. 
McClain is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, of 
which his wife was also a member. Mr. McClain is a Royal Arch Mason 
and a Knight Templar Mason and has served as worthy master of his 
lodge. He is also a member of the Knights of Pythias. Politically he 
is a stalwart supporter of Democratic policies. 

Daniel Hillman Goodrich. A well known citizen of Waverly, 
Tennessee, is Daniel Hillman (Joodrich, a loyal Tennesseean' who wore 
the **gray" in the days of 1861-65 and. who is now serving his third 
term as county clerk of Humphreys county. By paternal descent he 
comes of New England ancestry, while the Hillmans, his mother's people, 
were originally a New Jersey family. Tlis birth occurred near Old 
Dover furnace, Stewart county, Tennessee^ October 14, 1837. Justice 
B. Goodrich, his father, born in Connecticut in 1801, came to Kentucky 
as a young man and there was married to Jane H. Hillman, who was born 
in New Jersey in 1811. He had learned the trade of a moulder and fur- 
nace man and after his marriage he went into Alabama with his father- 
in-law, Mr. Hillman, to prospect in iron ores. At ^lobile, Alabama, 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1375 

Justice Goodrich cast the first steamboat shaft cast in the South. While 
they were in Alabama Mr. Hillman died and Mr. Goodrich then returned 
to Tennessee. Being of a roving disposition, he followed his occupation 
first in one locality and then another where there were furnaces, and 
finally passed away in 1849 in Kentucky, where he died of cholera. 
During his later years, however, he had taken up the study of medi- 
cine, making his professional preparation at the Louisville College of 
Medicine, Louisville, Kentucky, where he received his degree of M. D., 
and had practiced medicine in Kentucky and Missouri several years 
prior to his death. He was a Mason, a Whig in politics, and in religious 
faith and church membership was identified with the Christian denom- 
ination. His wife, who survived him until 1863, also was a member of 
tlie Christian church. To these parents were bom eight children, of 
whom four grew to maturity. 

Daniel Hillman Goodrich, the fifth of this family in order of birth, 
was educated in a seminary (Union Academy) near Triune, William- 
son county, Tennessee. In 1855, when yet a youth in his teens, he went 
to St. Louis, Missouri, where he entered the iron and heavy hardware 
business at No. 15 North Levee. On the 23d day of March, 1S61, he 
joined Company H, Second Missouri State Guard, and was captured 
at Camp Jackson, on the 10th of May, 1861, by the forces of General 
Lyon, commanding the Federal forces, and was paroled with the rest 
of his command, and the members of the First Missouri State Guard, 
on the night of the 12th of May, 1861. Remaining in St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, until July, 1861, he came to Nashville, Tenn. A few days after 
the battle of Belmont, IMissouri, he went to Columbus, Kentucky, and 
made application for an. exchange, through General Polk, commanding 
the Confederate forces at Columbus, Kentucky. General Polk ordered 
him back, to Nashville, Tennessee, to await an exchange. 

Just before the fall of Nashville, Tennessee, 1862, he went to Knox- 
ville, expecting to join Company B, Rock City Chiards, First Tennessee 
(Manny's Regiment) but having nothing to show that he had been 
exchanged, was not accepted, but was told to follow the regiment until 
an exchange could be arranged. He continued with the regiment (doing 
camp service) until after the battle of Shiloh. While in Corinth, he 
met Maj. H. W. Williams, of General Price's staff, who asked him if he 
had been exchanged. Answering in the negative, he was ordered to 
Atlanta, Georgia, to await exchange. Remaining in Atlanta and Mar- 
ietta, Georgia, about sixty days, hearing nothing from Major Williams, 
and having no means of getting a living, Mr. Goodrich accepted a position 
as agent of the Navy Department, to get up iron to make gunboat plates 
for the vessels under construction, at Mobile, Selma, and Columbus, 
Alabama, and Savannah, Georgia, Charleston, South Carolina, and Wil- 
mington, North Carolina, occupying this position until the retreat of 
General Joseph E. Johnston from Dalton, Georgia, when he was placed 



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1376 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

in charge of the Macon & Western Railroad, as headquarter railroad 
agent, at Atlanta, Georgia. After the fall of Atlanta, he was sent to 
GriflBn, then to Lovejoy Station, Jonesboro, and then back to Atlanta^ 
Georgia, at which place he was at the close of the war. 

Returning to Nashville, Tennessee, he engaged in the hardware and 
iron business until July, 1866, when he came to Humphreys county, 
Tennessee, locating at Hurricane Mills, remaining there until September, 
1875, when he came to Waverly, Tennessee, where he has remained, 
being engaged in the dry-goods and other business, until 1893, when 
he was appointed postmaster, under Cleveland's second administration 
and served four years, then going into the mercantile business and 
remained in that until he was elected county court clerk, which office 
he has occupied ever since. 

Mr. Goodrich is a firm Democrat in belief, a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, a member of the Knights and Ladies 
of Honor, and one of the oldest Masons in the state, having been made 
a Master Mason in 1858 in St. Louis, Missouri. 

On May 19, 1881, he married Miss 3aUie C. Hancock, of Wilson 
county* Tennessee, from which union have been born the following 
children: Lev. Hancock, now a resident of Pine Bluff, Arkansas; 
Sophia D., now Mrs. Harry D. Scott, of Memphis, Tennessee; Ellen 
Louise, Daniel H., and Sarah Hilda (twins) who are at the parental 
home. The family, except Lev. H., are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church, South, of which church Mr. Goodrich has been a steward 
for thirty years. 

Rev. Samuel A. Steel, D. D. Dr. Steel, .who is now pastor of a 
large church in Columbia, South Carolina, has long enjoyed the repu- 
tation of being a prominent minister of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
South. He has been in charge of the largest churches of his denomina- 
tion in the cities of Richmond, Virginia, Columbus, Mississippi, Mem- 
phis and Nashville, Tennessee, Louis\alle, Kentucky, and Kansas City, 
Missouri, and has filled important p6sitions in the editorial and educa- 
tional work of his church. His career has been marked by fidelity and 
earnestness, and he has had his full share of the **heat and burden of 
the day." Samuel Augustus Steel was born near Grenada, Mississippi, 
on October 5, 1849. His father was Rev. Ferdinand Lawrence Steel, 
a native of Payetteville, North Carolina, and of staunch Irish ancestry ; 
and his mother was Miss Amanda Fitzgerald Steel (nee Hankins), who 
was born at Paris, Tennessee, a representative of one of the old and 
honored families of the state. Rev. Ferdinand L. Steel moved from 
North Carolina to Mississippi in 1845, and soon after entered the min- 
istry of the ]\Iethodist church, and was a pioneer preacher all over North 
^Mississippi and West Tennessee. He fell a victim to an epidemic of 
cholera in Memphis in 1873, in the sixtieth year of his age. His widow 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS J 377 

survived him a score of years, and died in Nashville, Tennessee, at the 
home of her son at the advanced age of serventy-six years. When the 
war for the Union began, Dr. Steel was eleven years old. As the war 
broke up everything in the South, he was deprived of the advantages of 
early education, and his childhood and youth were spent amid the tur- 
bulent scenes of that terrible struggle, and the chaotic reconstruction 
period that succeeded it. He vividly describes many of these scenes in 
his lecture on **Home Life in Dixie During the War,'' which he has 
delivered nearly a thousand times throughout the United States. It 
was a severe school in which he was brought up, but it taught him those 
lessons of self-reliance, fearlessness and enei^y that have been charac- 
teristic of his career. 

He was nearly grown before he had a chance to attend school; but 
so well had he been taught at home, and so earnestly had he applied 
himself to study, that within three years after he left the farm in Mis- 
sissippi, and while still an under-graduate at Emory and Henry College, 
in Virginia, he was elected chaplain of the University of Virginia; a 
very high honor, for at that time the chaplain ranked with the pro- 
fessors of the University. 

Dr. Steel was too young to enter the Confederate army, and got a 
well-remembered whipping at home for attempting to do so. General 
Forrest himself turned him over to his mother for salutary discipline, 
telling her they had *'no cradles at the front,'' and threatening to 
thrash him himself if he ran away and came. But he was a fiery little 
''rebel," and to humor him and keep him at home, his parents allowed 
him to **run the blockade," and smuggle such things through the 
Yankee lines at Memphis, as were of use to the Confederates. He became 
an ''artful dodger" of blue-coated pickets, and had many thrilling 
adventures. 

When Dr. Steel left home to go to school on his own hook, he 
started in as a pupil of !Miss Maria Anderson, who had a little school 
in the countr}^ near ^lemphis. Here he cut cross-ties for what is now 
the Illinois Central Railroad, roasted his potatoes in the yard, and slept 
on a straw pallet; and he feels a deep debt of gratitude to the noble 
young woman who encouraged him, and assisted him to get a start. 
Prom this school he went to Memphis, then to Andrew College, at 
Trenton, Tennessee, where he spent a year. The pastor of the Meth- 
odist church at Hickman, Kentucky, having died, young Steel was 
appointed to fill his place, and he was in charge of this church for the 
year 1870. By saving his salary, he was able to go to college, and on 
the advice of Bishop McTyeire he decided to enter Emory and Henry. 
College, in the mountains of Southwestern Virginia. Soon after he 
entered the college, the health of the Methodist pastor at Abingdon, a 
town not far from Emory, having failed, young Steel was appointed to 
take charge of the church in Abingdon. While this put a very heavj^ 



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1378 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

burden on him it was a very fortunate circumstance. The salary enabled 
him to continue at college, while his work in Abingdon introduced him 
to many of the best and most influential people in Virginia. While in 
Abingdon, too, he met the accomplished lady, Miss Mary Burns, who 
subsequently became his wife. She was then a teacher in Martha Wash- 
ington Female College in Abingdon. 

It was while he was at Emory and Henry College that Mr. Steel's 
friends had him elected chaplain of the University of Virginia, where 
he succeeded the Rev. T. D. Witherspoon, D. D. He spent two years 
at the university, and while there was happily married to ]\Iiss Mary 
Burns, of Petersburg, Virginia. When he left the university, Mr. Steel 
was appointed to Broad Street Methodist church in Richmond, Virginia, 
where he spent three years. Then he was sent to Columbus, Mississippi, 
where he remained four years; from there he removed to Memphis, 
Tennessee. 

In 1888, Dr. Steel, who was then the pastor of Walnut Street ]Meth- 
odist church, in Louisville, Kentucky, was appointed the Fraternal Dele- 
gate from the Methodist Episcopal church, South, to the General Con- 
ference of the Methodist Episcopal church, which met in New York 
City. His address before that body made a profound impression, and 
has been pronounced one of the finest examples of fraternal oratory. 
It was while he lived in Louisville that the wife of his youth, to whom ' 
he felt that his success was largely due, was called home. Four chil- 
dren had blessed the union, and his mother now took charge of his home. 

Four years later, while pastor of McKendree church, Nashville, 
Tennessee, he was again happily married to Miss Ella Battle Brevard, 
of Union City, Tennessee. Five children have come to the home as the 
result of this happy marriage. 

In 1894 Dr. Steel, while serving as pastor of West End church in 
Nashville, was elected by the General Conference, then in session in 
Memphis, the first general secretary of the Epworth League, and editor 
of the Epworth Era, the new paper published by the church for the 
young people. Dr. Steel had had some editorial experience, having 
edited the Advocate of Missions, and in company with Dr. Galloway, 
afterward Bishop Galloway, the Southern Prohibitionist ^ at Colum- 
bus, Mississippi. This was the first paper published in the South to 
advocate the prohibition of the liquor traffic. Dr. Steel's editorial 
management of The Epworth Era, gave that paper a reputation for 
vivacity, spirit and aggressiveness, such as few religious journals acquire. 
Indeed, he put so much fire and ginger in it, that it got him into serious 
trouble with the authorities of his church, and they had him up and 
tried him. He was entirely too independent to edit a church ** organ," 
and retired from the official tripod at the next General Conference. 
When his term as Epworth League secretary ended, Dr. Steel spent 
several years on the lecture platform, where he achieved enviable fame 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1379 

as a popular speaker, especially on themes connected with the war for 
the Union. In 1898 he accepted the presidency of Logan Female Col- 
lege, at Russellville, Kentucky. From there he went to Lumberton, 
Mississippi, where he operated for a time the Lamar Manual Labor 
School. This school failed for lack of funds, but had an important 
influence in starting the splendid system of industrial schools now 
conducted by the state. After a brief connection with educational work 
in Oklahoma, Dr. Steel re-entered the work of the pastorate, and was 
appointed to Brownwood, Texas. He was caUed to take charge of the 
old Memphis Conference Female Institute, located at Jackson, Tennes- 
see. He remained here, however, only a year, for he was needed more 
in the pastoral work of his church, for which he has always shown a 
special fitness; and he was appointed to his present position, as pastor 
of the leading Methodist church in Columbia, South Carolina. 

Dr. Steel received the degree of Master of Arts, pro causa honoris, 
from Emory and Henry College in 1881, and that of Doctor of Divinity 
from Emory College, Oxford, Georgia, in 1884. 

Dr. Steel has been greatly blessed in his family, and notwithstanding 
his extensive travels, he is decidedly a home-loving man. His oldest 
child is the wife of Mr. John Harvey Creighton, who at present is the 
eflftcient secretary of the Y. M. C. A. in Roanoke, Virginia. His second 
child is the Rev. Edward Marvin Steel, a talented young preacher of 
the Tennessee Conference, stationed at present at Lewisburg, Tennessee. 
His third child, beautiful Christine, died in 1898, at the early age of 
fourteen. The fourth, Miss Miriam, is a teacher in Collegio Isabella 
Hendrix, in Bello Horozonte, Brazil. The children of the second mar- 
riage are: Thomas Brevard, now in college, and the four girls, Gerald, 
Virginia, Ella Lee, and Chloe LoUise, who make up the happy home 
circle in South Carolina. 

William Henry Sneed. The bar of the state, and of east Tennessee 
in particular, has had no more conspicuous name during the past seventy 
or more years than that of Sneed. Ability, personality, character and fine 
achievement have so long been associated with the name that it has be- 
come s5nQonymous with those qualities in the minds of certainly the great 
majority of members of the profession in Tennessee as well as with 
thousands of citizens. Beginning in the decade of the '30s and continu- 
ing to the end of the '60s one of the very ablest lawyers of east Ten- 
nessee, and the associate of many of the eminent men of the time, was 
William H. Sneed. The mantle of his dignity and ability later fell upon 
his son, Judge Joseph W. Sneed, who for upwards of forty years has 
borne a prominent part in public affairs and as a lawyer and judge in 
Knoxville and vicinity. 

At a recent meeting of the bar association of the state, held at the 
Hermitage Hotel in Nashville, the Hon. William A. Henderson deliv- 



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1380 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

ered an address entitled: '*Some of the Lawyers of East Tennessee Who 
Are Being Forgotten.'' Among others he gave his reminiscences of 
Col. William H. Sneed. These memories form a delightful portrait of 
a splendid character, whose record is an enduring honor to the history 
of the Tennessee bar, and for this reason the portion of the address per- 
taining to Colonel Sneed will be presented here practically as delivered. 

**I now draw your attention to Col. William H. Sneed. To revive the 
memory of him will be interesting to you, and a labor of love for me. I 
probably knew him better than any man now living. 

**For a quarter of a century Colonel Sneed was in the forefront of 
the distinguished lawyers of east Tennessee. In his time and in that re- 
gion there was a very able bar. Tennessee lawyers have always taken 
high rank. From wide experience and observation, I know of none 
better in the United States. Among his associates were R. J. McKinney, 
Thomas A. R. Nelson, Landon C. Haynes, Horace Maynard, Thomas C. 
Lyon, James R. Cocke, Dan Trewhitt, Walter R. Evans, S. B. Boyd, 0. P. 
Temple, Thomas D. Arnold, David M. Key, James T. Shields, John 
Baxter, and others. 

** Colonel Sneed was born in Davidson county about the year 1812. 
Although an educated man, he was not a college man. In early man- 
hood he read law with Charles Ready, at Murf reesboro, and soon became 
his partner. In the early forties he was elected to the state senate, and 
became intimately acquainted with the members from the *Hill Country 
of Judea,' as a result of which he located at Greenville, Tennessee. He 
married at Murfreesboro, and a daughter was born, a beautiful girl who 
lived many years in Nashville. After moving to Greenville a daughter 
of Dr. Williams, a prominent man in that locality, became his second 
wife. He left as children Judge Joseph Sneed, whom you all know as 
an able lawyer ; Thomas Sneed, a business man of Memphis ; Mrs. Kate 
Sneed Jones, of Washington ; and ]\Irs. Fannie Eldridge, of Mississippi. 
All are living except the eldest daughter. 

* * I think Colonel Sneed was the handsomest man I ever knew. He was 
more than good looking. Every excellence of manhood may be com- 
pressed into one word, and that word is strength ; so the opposite may be 
expressed in the one word weakness. The most terse illustration of a 
mere manikin is in the question so well known to all of you : * What went 
you out for to see— ^a reed shaken by the wind?' Perfect manhood is 
strength of body, strength of mind, strength of soul. It is a trinity, as 
most things are on earth and in heaven. Colonel Sneed was of medium 
height, broad shouldered, deep chested, of heavy build, and with a 
quick, strong, positive walk. In everything he was intense. Like every 
strong man, he had many warm friends, and a few bitter enemies. Show 
me a man without enemies, and I will show you a man of little account. 
His partners in business in east Tennessee were, first. Judge McE^inney, 
then Judge Temple, then Mr. Cocke, a great-grandson of William Cocke, 



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TENNESSEE AND TExXNESSEANS 1381 

and still later myself, until I became a soldier. I first knew him when I 
was a boy. He always called me *Will,' and continued to do so until the 
death-bed. As a young man I became more intimate with him. 

'*He had a heavy suit of hair which rebelled like a lion's mane, and 
was white as wool. His appearance would indicate that his individuality 
came largely from his mother. For one term he was a Whig member of 
Congress, and the ardent supporter of that * Harry of the West. ' He was 
a conspicuous candidate for the supreme bench against his late partner, 
Chief Justice McKinney — that grand old judge known to the members 
of the bar as *01d Strictissimus. ' It is said that Colonel Sneed was de- 
feated by only one vote. It is an interesting fact that many contests of 
this kind in this country have been decided by a majority of but a single 
vote in the legislative bodies. Like most Whigs, as the rebellion ap- 
proached, he was a strong Union man, and took a prominent part in the 
ensuing campaign. But when Tennessee finally seceded he followed 
her behests and espoused her cause. When the federal troops approached 
Knoxville, under Burnside, he refugeed to Liberty (now Bedford City), 
Virginia, with his family, and remained there until the end of the war. 
He then returned to Knoxville and, until his death, spent the most of his 
time in gathering together the fragments of a large estate which had 
been nearly devoured by the cupidity and animosities of war. 

**He never sought to re-enter the general practice. In the various 
partnerships in which he engaged, certainly the last one, he spent most 
of his time in equity practice and in the supreme court, although he did 
much nisi prius work. Far beyond the average lawyer, he gave time 
and labor to the preparation of his cases. He was at his desk early and 
late. Every document was scrutinized, every witness interviewed, and he 
went into battle armed cap-a-pie. He took a professional pride in never 
asking for a continuance of a case, and always resisted such applications 
from his opponents or from his partners. His manner of argument was 
loud and intense, with that eloquence that always flows from a settled be- 
lief in the justice and truth of one's insistence. He had a habit, in his 
delivery, of tapping the palm of his left hand with the forefinger of his 
right, as if nailing attention to his point. The man who believes his own 
contention is always eloquent. This addiction of his mind was so strong 
that he would never take the opposite view of any question from that 
which he had entertained in some other independent case. Many times 
I have heard him say : * I am on record against such a view of the law 
in some stated case.' 

** Another peculiarity of Colonel Sneed 's life as a lawyer was that he 
would never prosecute a criminal case. His theory was that when the 
state alleged a violation of her law by one of her citizens, outsiders should 
have no place in securing a conviction. For myself, I think this is a 
good theory, but sometimes fkulty practice. I have not always followed 
his teachings in this regard. But all the law-breakers agreed with him. 



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1382 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

As an examiner of witnesses, and in the high art of cross-examination, 
he was a marked success. His whole manner indicated a desire to un- 
ravel and untangle the truth, and, in handling witnesses, he was as kind 
as a mother talking to her boy. But when he detected fraud, he could 
be as cruel as a surgeon's scalpel. His manner toward the court showed 
an honest effort to discover and enforce the law, as an assistant to the 
judge. As to the jury he was always *in the box,' as the thirteenth man. 

'*More than any lawyer I ever knew, he had the art and courage of 
how to charge a fee. His fees were higher than those of his associates, 
but I never heard of any dissatisfaction or disagreement on the part 
of his clients in that behalf. The bar does not seem to appreciate the 
fundamental principle of humanity to value a thing by the measure of 
its price. This is the reason why gold is more precious than iron, and 
the diamond than the garnet. Let me illustrate this by a reminiscence : 

''During the prime of Colonel Sneed's life as a lawyer, the county 
of Campbell, in East Tennessee, was torn asunder by the case of Miller 
versus Dossett. The litigants were prominent and well-to-do farmers 
of that country. Each owned a cow, and these cows resembled each other 
in appearance. Each cow had a calf, and these calves were very much 
alike also. The animals were being pastured on a small island in Powell's 
river, when one night a sudden freshet came a9d one of the calves was 
washed away. The remaining calf, having some doubt as to his nativity, 
or possibly from purely selfish motives, then cultivated the habit of 
sucking both cows. The question involved in the suit was the ownership 
of the calf. The two old friends became bitter enemies, and went to 
law. There were actions and cross-actions, of replevin and detinue, in- 
dictments for larceny, and several actions for libel and slander, all 
choking the dockets of the roaring courthouse at Jacksboro. The country 
took sides like Highland clans. The best lawyers in that end of the state 
gathered to that feast. On one side were Colonel Sneed, Judge Boyd, 
Judge Young, Mr. Evans, and other lieutenants; on the other, Horace 
Maynard, Joseph B. Heiskell, John Netherland, and other lieutenants. 
After years of hard-fought litigation Colonel Sneed was unsuccessful 
in his cause, but charged a fee of five thousand dollars, which was 
cheerfully paid. Horace Maynard and his associates gained the cases, 
and he received a fee of twenty-five dollars. His explanation was that 
his actual fee was ten thousand dollars, but all except the twenty-five 
dollars was paid in glory. • • • 

''The testimonial of respect paid Colonel Sneed by the bar of East 
Tennessee, and the high esteem in which he was held by his brother 
lawyers, as a man, citizen and lawyer, is evidenced by the memorial pre- 
sented at the time of his demise, in the supreme court room at the 
September term, 1869, of that court. These proceedings have been per- 
petuated by being published at the end of the sixth volume of Caldwell's 
Reports. It is worthy of note that at this meeting, Thomas D. Arnold, 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1383 

the senior member of the bar, presided ; James W. Deadrick, afterwards 
chief justice of the supreme court, was chairman of the committee on 
resolutions; and John Baxter and Thomas A. R. Nelson acted as secre- 
taries. Colonel Sneed has also received honorable mention in Caldwell's 
* Bench and Bar of Tennessee,' page 299. At the time of his death, 
September, 1869, his brother members of the bar took suitable and appro- 
priate action commemorative of his life and avocation, which are pub- 
lished at the end of Vol. VI, Caldwell's Tennessee Reports. 

**If you were to select a few of the big lawyers of Tennessee he 
would be located within the glorious circle of its pride. As a man in 
political oflSce, he was a patriot of renown; as a citizen he was a bom 
leader of men ; the escutcheon of his private life went to the tomb without 
a stain on its face. As a husband and father he was the soul of love. 
Colonel Sneed 's name has been crystallized in the name of Sneedville, in 
Hancock county. 

* * This is a truthful memoir from a friend. What more can tongue or 
pen say?" 

(This article by Mr. Henderson was written May 22, 1911.) 

Judge Joseph William Sneed. A few years after the death of 
Col. W. H. Sneed, his eldest son, Joseph W., gained his first laurels in 
the law and public affairs, and now for many years has been one of the 
eminent citizens of Knoxville and East Tennessee, in which time he has 
held many positions of trust and honor at the hands of the people. 

Judge Sneed is a native of Knox county, and received his education 
at the old East Tennessee University, now known as the University of 
Tennessee. After the military department was added to the university, 
he was the first adjutant of the cadets, having been appointed by Captain 
Mariner, who was the first commandant. 

His public career began with a short term as member of the municipal 
council of Knoxville. In 1886 he was the first city attorney elected under 
the charter which has just been abandoned for the commission form of 
government, and was successively elected to this position for four years. 

In 1891 Judge Sneed was appointed criminal judge by Governor 
Buchanan, being at that time thirty-six years of age, his appointment 
being to fill the unexpired term of Judge S. T. Logan. As criminal 
judge he stood for election in 1892, and was successful over a Houk Re- 
publican, M. F. Caldwell, by 503 majority. 

In 1894 he competed for the honors of the circuit judgeship. His 
opponent was Judge S. T. Logan, and he won the race by a majority 
of 457. This was a unique political achievement, for he was the only 
Democrat elected that year to any office, save in some of the minor posi- 
tions, like constable or justice of the peace, and the election covered prac- 
tically all the county offices. 

In 1902 Judge Sneed was re-elected circuit judge by a majority of 



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1384 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

1,261. In the last half century no other Democratic candidate for 
judicial honors in this part of the state has been so distinctly honored as 
Judge Sneed. No other Democratic nominee has been elected to a judicial 
position by entire East Tennessee constituents since before the war, 
during the decade of the fifties. Yet on all the three occasions of his 
candidacy he accepted his nomination from the Democratic party and 
was its unequivocal candidate throughout the campaigns. 

In 1901, just prior to his last election, the legislature designated the 
circuit judge to hold the chancery court for Knox county, which posi- 
tion Judge Sneed filled up to the year 1909. When the courts of the 
state were redistricted in 1899, Judge Sneed was assigned to hold the 
circuit court of Sevier county, and he tried both civil and criminal cases 
for tliat county. Also by the act of 1899 he was again assigned to the 
criminal court of Knox county. Thus from 1899 to 1901 he held the 
circuit and criminal court of Knox county and the circuit court of 
Sevier county, and continued to hold them until 1902, and from 1901 to 
1907 held all the courts of Knox county. After the election of 1902 he 
was relieved of the court in Sevier county, though this, to only a small 
degree, lightened the arduous labors of his judicial responsibilities. 

During a considerable part of his career as judge the cases that 
passed under his review numbered in the aggregate more than two 
thousand each year. It required not only a strong constitution but also 
legal and executive ability of a high order to dispatch all this business. 
Despite the demands of this almost unremitting labor, the record of 
Judge Sneed stands in high light both in the quality and permanence of 
his decisions. It has been often said of him, and with truth, that only 
few of his cases were ever reversed by the higher courts, and the tribute 
is all the greater because he held all the courts of his county. 

Judge Sneed cast his first presidential vote in 1876 for Tilden and 
Hendricks, and has voted for every Democratic candidate for president 
and vice president ever since. He was recently a delegate to the Balti- 
more convention which nominated Wilson and Marshall, now president 
and vice president of the United States. On the nomination of Senator 
Luke Jjea he had the honor to be made chairman of the Tennessee dele- 
gation. After the convention he took the leading part in organizing a 
Wilson and Marshall Club at Knoxville, and gave his enthusiastic sup- 
port to the candidates throughout the campaign. 

Outside of his political and judicial career Judge Sneed has done 
much important service for his home city. When a member of the city 
council in 1885 he took the lead in advocacy of the building of a girls* 
high school, an institution now located at the corner of Union and 
Walnut streets that has had a splendid usefulness. He was chairman of 
the building committee until several private citizens were added to the 
committee membership, when, because of the presence of older men than 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1385 

himself, he voluntarily relinquished the post and Col. W. P. Washburn 
was appointed chairman. 

When the Knox County Reform School was established in 1897, it 
was provided that the chancellor and circuit judge of the county should 
appoint the trustees. Judge Lindsay as chancellor and Judge Sneed 
as circuit judge together made the first appointments. Through the re- 
districting act of 1899, Judge Lindsay having gone out of office, Judge 
Sneed made all subsequent appointments of trustees, except one made 
by Chancellor McClung, until his own retirement from the bench in 
1910. The reform school has been so successfully managed that up to 
the present time no word of just criticism has been passed, and it is con- 
sidered one of the best managed institutions of the state, as well as one 
of the most useful. This record is one that reflects high credit upon its 
trustees, in the first instance, and is also gratifying to the appointing 
power, for the destiny of the institution depended upon the wisdom ex- 
ercised in the selection of its governing authorities. Some time after 
the organization of the institution, it was provided that a board of 
trustees, composed of women members, should take the management of 
the girls' department. The selection of these trustees also devolved 
upon Judge Sneed, and the record of their work in their special depart- 
ment has been fully as efficient as that made by the board for the entire 
school. 

Since the expiration of his third term of office, on September 1, 1910, 
Judge Sneed has devoted himself to the practice of his profession. He 
enjoys a generous share of the legal business in his home city and 
vicinity, and is regarded as one of the strongest members of the present 
Knoxville bar. 

John William Seaton. A man of integrity and honor and one well 
worthy of the high regard in which he is held throughout the community 
in which he lives is John William Seaton, of Linden, now clerk of the 
cii'cuit court in Perry county and for eighteen years prominently identi- 
fied with educational work in that county. He is a native of Gibson 
county, Tennessee, where he was born March 1, 1873. Ryan Seaton, his 
grandfather, was one of the many immigrants to Tennessee from the 
older commonwealth of North Carolina, his advent here having been 
made during the forepart of the last century. He was a soldier in the 
War of 1812 and fought with Gen. Andrew Jackson at the battle of New 
Orleans. Prior to leaving North Carolina he was married to a Miss 
Stinson, and on coming to this state located with his family near Pulaski, 
Giles county, where the remainder of his career was spent as a farmer. 
He and his wife reared five children, of which family John Green Seaton, 
the father of John William, was second in birth. John Green Seaton was 
born in IMaury county, Tennessee, May 15, 1840, and there received such 
educational discipline as the common schools of the period afforded. He 



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1386 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

was numbered among the gallant sons of Tennessee that fought to sustain 
the southern cause during the Civil war. In Maury county, in 1872, he 
was married to Miss Lou Bell, who was born in Lawrence county, this 
state, June 9, 1848. To this union were born five sons, as follows : John 
William Seaton of this review ; Smith B. ; James T. ; Benjamin, deceased ; 
and another that died in infancy. The father died September 26, 1878, 
and later his widow married M. G. Alley. They are now farmer resi- 
dents near Humboldt, Gibson county, Tennessee. 

John William Seaton was educated in the public schools at Trenton, 
Tennessee, in Scott's Hill Academy, Henderson county, and at the South-, 
em Normal University, Huntington, Tennessee. He then took up the 
profession of teaching and for eighteen years was employed as an in- 
structor in Perry county and Decatur county. From 1907 to 1909 he 
was superintendent of public instruction in Perry county and at the 
same time he continued to be engaged in teaching, as was permissible at 
that time. In 1910 he was elected clerk of the circuit court in Perry 
co\mty for a term of four years and is now engaged in that oflBcial service. 
He has also served as a district tax collector in that county. 

In 1896 he was united in marriage to Miss Penina Lomax, who is a 
daughter of John Lomax, a farmer residing near Cedar Creek, Perry 
county. Six children have been born to this union, namely : Grace, who 
died in 1898 in her second year ; Eugene, who died in 1903 at the age of 
four; Nettie, O'Dell, John William and Pauline. 

In political views Mr. Seaton is a Democrat; in church membership 
he is identified with the Baptist denomination and is now clerk of the 
Tennessee Baptist Association. 

James Wilson Lewis. When it is stated that this esteemed citizen 
of Linden has served as clerk and master of chancery in the Perry county 
court since 1908, and has been in public service in Perry county in one 
capacity or another for the last thirty years, further attestation of his 
worth and standing in that community is unnecessary. Two generations 
of this family have been native to Tennessee and have sprung from their 
common ancestor, Aaron Lewis, the grandfather of James Wilson, who 
was one of the many settlers that came into this state from North Caro- 
lina in the opening years of the nineteenth century, and who was one 
of the first settlers in Perry county. Aaron Lewis located first in the 
Yellow creek district in Dickson county and there was married to Polly 
Ann Dickson, who bore him ten children. In 1836 he removed with his 
family to Perry county, locating on Lick creek, about four miles from 
the Tennessee river. He was one of the first settlers in Perry county and 
became one of its most prominent men of that time, serving as the first 
tax collector of that county. William Kennedy Lewis, his son, who was 
born in the Yellow creek district in Dickson county in 1827, accom- 
panied the family to Perry county in 1836, and spent the remainder of 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1387 

his life there. He received but a meager education and early took up 
farming as his vocation, his estate being located along Cypress creek, 
near the Tennessee river. In the war between the states he espoused the 
southern cause and as a member of the Forty-second Regiment of Ten- 
nessee Infantry fought to sustain it. He enlisted as a member of Captain 
Hulm's company, which was assigned to the Forty-second Tennessee 
Regiment under command of Gen. W. A. Quarles and in the army of Gen. 
Albert Sidney Johnston. This regiment bore a most gallant part at the 
battle of Fort Donelson, but was captured there, and Mr. Lewis was one 
of the prisoners taken to Camp Douglass, where he was held seven months 
before his exchange was effected. He then rejoined the army at Fort 
Hudson and continued to serve until the closing year of the war. Return- 
ing to Perry county he resumed farming and was thereafter engaged in 
that vocation until his death in 1897. In Perry county, in 1844, he was 
united in marriage to Miss Susana J. Coleman, who was born in Hickman 
county in 1829, and died in 1909. They became the parents of six 
children, the second of whom was James Wilson Lewis of this review. 
William Walker Lewis, of Hohenwald, Tennessee, is the only other mem- 
ber of the family yet living. 

James Wilson Lewis was born in District No. 2 of Perry county, 
Tennessee, May 12, 1848. Reared in his native county, he there received 
a common school education and later became a teacher in the country 
schools of his vicinity. He was also employed for a time as a clerk in 
a country store. At the age of twenty-seven he entered into the mer- 
cantile business with R. J. Howard, under style and firm name of 
Howard & Lewis, at East Perryville, continuing there until 1880, when 
he moved to Marsh Creek and was there engaged in the timber business 
for a short time. His public service began in 1882, when he was elected 
clerk of the circuit court in Perry county, in which oflBcial capacity he 
served four terms, or sixteen years, and following that he was elected 
magistrate of the third civil district. On January 1, 1908, he was 
appointed clerk and master in chancery court in the county of Perry for 
a term of six years, and is now filling that position. He is a Democrat 
in his political views. 

Mr. Lewis has been twice married. His first wife was Miss Rebecca 
Josephine Sutton, daughter of James R. Sutton of Perry county, whom 
he wedded in 1876. At her death on September 23, 1895, at the age of 
thirty-seven, she left two children : Martha Jane, who is now Mrs. W. J. 
Bray, of Jackson, Tennessee, and Julia Bertie, who is now the wife of 
J. C. Ward, of Perry county. In 1897 Mr. Lewis was joined in marriage 
to Miss Minnie J. Dickson, daughter of J. T. Dickson, of Lick Creek, 
Perry county. To this union have been born four daughters : Irma Lo- 
raine, Dorothy May, Mary Inez and Pearl Vivian. Both Mr. and Mrs. 
Lewis are members of the Methodist Episcopal church South, and are 
prominent in church work, the former having served as a steward of his 



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1388 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

church for a number of years. His fraternal associations are with the 
Masonic order as a member of the Linden Lodge No. 210, Free and Ac- 
cepted ]\Iasons, and of Linden Chapter No. 156, Royal Arch Masons, and 
he has served as secretary in both lodges. 

Gentry Richard McGee. A public citizen of Jackson, Tennessee, 
whose life of educational service should be given more detailed account 
than we have data to provide, is Gentry Richard McGee, who recently 
closed his long pedagogic career and is now living retired. Since he was 
a lad of twelve years of age he has called Tennessee his home, and in 
more than one way has nobly served his commonwealth. Born in Ebe- 
nezer, Mississippi, he was the son of James Gentry McGee, M. D., who 
spent his entire professional life in that place, and of Mary Ann Ford, 
who was a native of Pearl River, Mississippi, and a daughter of Rufus 
Ford. The date of Gentry Richard McGee 's birth was September 17, 
1840, and he began his life and education as a typical American boy of 
cultured and well-to-do parents. But in 1850 Dr. McGee 's life was cut 
short by a sudden illness, and within ten days from that time his widow 
also answered the death summons. Their orphaned son went to the home 
of a pateriial uncle at Trenton, Tennessee, which continued to be his 
home until he was well launched upon his life's career. 

Having received some years of educational training at Ebenezer, Mis- 
sissippi, young Gentry IVIcGee next entered Gibson Academy at Trenton, 
under the guidance of his uncle, who was living at that place. After com- 
pleting the prescribed courses at that school, he matriculated at Andrew 
College at Trenton, Tennessee, where he passed all courses and examina- 
tions, entitling him to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Before he could 
return, in order that his degree might be conferred upon him, he was 
withheld by the call for service which was entailed on all patriotic citi- 
zens by the declaration of war between the North and the South. 

Mr. McGee enlisted in May, 1861, with the Twelfth Tennessee In- 
fantry, under Col. R. M. Russell. He served in most of the battles of 
the campaign from Missionary Ridge to Atlanta, concluding with the 
battle of Nashville. A private when he entered the Confederate army, 
he was in the course of the war raised to the rank of second lieutenant of 
Company B. 

On the conclusion of the sectional conflict, Mr. McGee returned to 
Trenton and to his uncle 's home. There he proceeded to assist the latter 
by putting in the crop then due for planting in this locality, and in 
agricultural activities with his relative, Mr. McGee continued for two 
years, in the meantime looking to his chosen life work. 

In 1867 Mr. McGke took charge of the school at Miller's chapel, 
where he taught for two and a half years. He then accepted a position 
as instructor in the academy at Bells. After one year in that institution 
he organized the schools at Trenton, where he acted both as instructor 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1389 

and as superintendent. For a period of twenty-six and one-half years 
Superintendent McGee retained this position, steadily building up the 
school system to one of strength and marked efficiency. 

In August of 1899 Superintendent McGee tendered his resignation a& 
head of the Trenton schools in order to accept the principalship of the 
high school of Jackson. Having officiated in the latter capacity for four 
years, he was honored by election to the position of superintendent of 
this city's system of education. His direction of Jackson's schools con- 
tinued for nine years, at the conclusion of which time, in 1912, he ten- 
dered his resignation as superintendent in order to retire to private life, 
where he is now engaged upon a work that will doubtless establish his 
name forever in educational circles. 

It is Professor McGee 's privilege to look back upon a career of the 
truest type of service the world knows — that in which the faithful, large- 
hearted educator truly stands in loco parentis to unlimited numbers of 
youths. The lives Professor McGee has touched for good, for stimulated 
action, for awakened conscience, for inspired purpose — these are legion y 
nor are their hearts without tribute, both spoken and silent. Printed 
volumes bear Gentry Richard McGee 's name, and the work of his hand 
and brain, in the shape of a school history of Tennessee, is now in general 
use in the public schools of the state, and he has for year^ been gath- 
ering material for a complete history of the United States which he ex- 
pects to bring to completion and publication in the course of the present 
year (1913), the same being designed for use in the public schools of the 
country. 

Professor McGee 's home life was established in 1872. In February 
of that year he was united in marriage to Miss Sallie Valentine Prentice^ 
of Richmond, Virginia, a cousin of the noted sculptor, Valentine. Mrs. 
McGee died in 1900. The only child born to them was a daughter, whom 
they named Ora Belle, and who is now the wife of George H. Brandau, of 
Jackson. 

Through the years he spent here and in Trenton, Professor McGee 
has made countless friendships in other relations apart from those of 
his immediate profession. These include those who have come in close 
touch with him in his connection with the Church of the Disciples, of 
which he is a member; in his affiliation with the party affairs of the 
Democracy; and in his membership in various fraternal organizations. 
Of the latter he belongs to the Masonic order, his mother lodge being 
at Trenton, where he is a past master, and his later association with 
Jackson Lodge No. 332, A. F. & A. M., to which he was transferred on the 
occasion of his removal to this place. He is also a member of the Kenton 
Chapter of the Knights Templar, and of the Knights of Pythias, No. 16, 
of which lodge he is past chancellor. 

The usefulness of Gentry Richard McGee 's life does not by any means 
cease with the laying aside of his official duties. Still young of heart and 



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1390 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

mind, still interested in all that promotes the best development of intel- 
ligence and character, he is the adviser of many individuals and many 
organizations. They are not few who both praise and affectionately envy 
the rich service of this veteran educator. 

\V. F. White. The tiller of the soil can enjoy to the fullest the 
bounties of nature, for he earns them well. On the farm there is oppor- 
tunity for the development of man's physical, mental and moral powers 
without restraint. From the sweet-scented fields and meadows comes an 
inspiration which cannot fail in its influence for good — an influence 
which is satisfying beyond that of the artificialities of city life. In such 
an atmosphere, in communion with nature, Mr. White has thrived and 
prospered. 

Mr. White's ancestors belonged to a class of wealthy and influential 
farmers, his maternal grandfather, Benjamin Taylor, who was born in 
North Carolina and came to Tennessee prior to 1800, owning consider- 
able land ; and his great-grandfather, Francis Ketring, being one of the 
wealthiest men of his time. A German by birth, Francis Ketring came 
from Pennsylvania to Tennessee accompanied by the soldiers. To each 
of his large family of children he gave a farm of considerable size. 

Coming to Tennessee in 1845 from Virginia, the state of his birth, 
Willis White, the father of W. F. White, three years later married Bar- 
bara Taylor, who was born in Sumner county, Tennessee, and who died 
in 1879. He was a farmer by occupation, a Democrat in politics, and be- 
longed to the Presbyterian church. His death occurred in 1886. W. F. 
White has one sister, Katie, who married I. D. Luton and lives in Nash- 
ville. 

Having finished his education in the common schools of Sumner 
county, Tennessee, in which county he was bom May 30, 1851, W. F. 
White decided that no occupation presented a better opportunity than 
did the one in which his ancestors had been so successful, and he ac- 
cordingly engaged in farming. His choice was a wise one and he is now 
one of the leading farmers in his section, fraternally afl&liated with the 
Masons, being a Chapter Mason, and in politics a Democrat. 

Mr. White married Ella Patterson, daughter of Capt. R. S. Patterson 
and Tennessee Jefferson of Nashville, Tennessee, and they are members 
of the Cumberland Presbyterian church. Their home and farm is an ob- 
ject of beauty and utility combined — a model of life in the country, in- 
dicative of the prosperity attained by its owner. 

George W. Jackson. The present judge of the county court of 
Sumner county received that distinction as a merited honor for his able 
record in business and citizenship. Judge Jackson, who is a native of 
this county and represents one of the old families here, began his career 
as a poor boy, and it has been due to his unremitting industry and fine 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1391 

business ability that he is now recognized as one of the most substantial 
farmers and public-spirited citizens of the county. 

George W. Jackson was born in Sumner county, April 7, 1862, a son 
of William and Nannie A. (Vanderville) Jackson. The paternal grand- 
father, Matthew Jackson, a native of North Carolina, brought his family 
of young children to Tennessee and settled on a farm in Davidson county. 
He was one of the early settlers here and during the thirties took service 
under General Jackson during the Seminole Indian war. The old planta- 
tion, of which he was the owner, was operated in the early days by slave 
labor. The Vandervilles, representing the maternal branch of the family, 
are also among the old citizens of Tennessee, Grandfather John Vander- 
ville having been born and reared in this state, and a son of one of the 
first settlers. 

William Jackson, the father, was bom in North Carolina in 1814, and 
died in 1870. His wife was bom in Davidson county, Tennessee, in 1823, 
and her death occurred in 1887. The father was a boy when his parents 
moved into Tennessee, settling on a farm in Davidson county. From 
there he came to Sumner county in 1860, and during the remainder of 
his life was a successful farmer here. He reared a family of eight chil- 
dren, seven of whom are now living, Judge Jackson being the fifth in 
order of birth. The parents were both members of the Methodist church. 
The father was a justice of the peace and for a number of years held the 
oflBce of coroner in Davidson county. Judge Jackson, during his boy- 
hood days, attended the free schools of Goodlettsville. Starting as a poor 
boy on a farm, he utilized his energies to the best advantage, and in 1835 
bought a farm on credit. The results of the next four or five years' 
efl&cient management enabled him to pay for this place, and he has long 
since been on the highroad of prosperity. At the present time his estate 
comprises five hundred- acres of land, for which he has been offered one 
hundred dollars per acre. He is also a stockholder in the Bank of 
Gtoodlettsville. 

In 1885 occurred his marriage to Miss Josie A. Crunk, a daughter pf 
John A. Crunk, one of Sumner county's farmers. Mr. and Mrs. Jackson 
are members of the Methodist church, in which he has served as steward 
for fifteen years past. His fraternal affiliations are with the Woodmen 
of the World. A Democrat in politics, he has never been an active seeker 
for ofl&ce, and the honors bestowed upon him by his party have all come 
unsolicited. The first important public oflBce which he held was that of 
justice of the peace, to which he was elected in 1892, and in 1912 he be- 
came county judge. He is also a member of the board of education. 

Hiram Neal. It is doubtful if any of the present citizens of Wilson 
county represents older and better known families in this vicinity than 
Hiram Neal, president of the Watertown Bank, and for many years a 
prominent business man and leader in local affairs. The Neals have been 



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1392 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

settled in this section of Tennessee for much more than a century, and 
wherever the name is found, it has been associated with substantial char- 
acter of citizenship, and a solid prosperity in material affairs. 

Hiram Neal, himself, is one of the oldest native residents of Wilson 
county, where he was born on the thirtieth of December, 1841, a son 
of Ashley and Elizabeth (Waters) Neal. The family came to this 
vicinity from Kentucky, where the paternal grandfather, Pallas Neal, 
was born, w^hence he came to Tennessee when a young man. The first 
name of his wife was Sallie. By occupation he was a farmer and stock 
raiser, and he spent most of his active career in Wilson county, where he 
died. The maternal grandfather, named Shelah Waters, was a native 
of Maryland, leaving there in 1789 for Virginia, whence he came in 
1811 to Wilson county, Tennessee, during the pioneer epoch, and spent 
the rest of his life in this state. 

Ashley Neal, the father, was born in Wilson county in 1803, and 
died in 1886, at a very advanced age. His wife, also born in this county 
in 1804, passed away in May, 1865. His lines of business were farming 
and the raising of stock, and he also was known to a considerable extent 
as a dealer and trader in stock. His farm consisted of between three 
hundred and four hundred acres of land, and he owned some slaves, for 
the cultivation of his crops, during the ante-bellum days. He was also 
a member of the Grange ; in politics during his early life he was a Whig, 
subsequently a Republican, and although he had been a slave owner, he 
was a strong Union man in his sympathies. His wife was a member of 
the Missionary Baptist church. They were the parents of ten children, 
and five of them are now living, Hiram Neal having been the ninth in 
order of birth. 

Hiram Neal grew up in his home district of Wilson county, and when 
a boy attended the country schools of that vicinity. His education was 
completed in Pennsylvania, where he attended school for a time. His 
practical career commenced on a farm, and he bought sixty acres on 
credit, which he was able, by his industry and good management, to pay 
off within the time appointed at the beginning. He is now the owner of 
one hundred acres of farm land, near Watertown, but has owned much 
more than this at an earlier period in his career, since he has given his 
children good farms, and has been prosperous to a very gratifying 
degree. Mr. Neal is president of the Bank of Watertown, and for the 
past eighteen years has served his community in the office of justice of 
the peace. 

In 1866 he married Elizabeth Whaley, a daughter of William Whaley, 
a merchant of De Kalb county, Tennessee. The two children now living 
are Sallie, who is the wife of C. A. Smith, and resides on a farm in 
Wilson county; and A. W., who is a resident of Nashville, Tenn. Mr. 
Neal and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist church, and in 
politics he has maintained an independent attitude. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1393 

J. N. Curd, M. D. One of the most successful farmers and prominent 
men of Wilson county, Tennessee, is Dr. J. N. Curd, who having spent a 
number of years of his life as a practitioner of medicine, turned after a 
time to farming and has made as good a farmer as he did a doctor. He is 
a man of wide personal popularity, and the respect which his neighbors 
have for him gives him no small influence on the life of the community. 
He served in the Civil war and has helped to make the New South out 
of the ruins of the old, and all through these years he has used his 
influence and aid in all projects that would be of benefit to the com- 
munity. 

J. N. Curd is a native of Wilson county, but comes of Virginia 
parentage, his father having been bom in the latter state in 1805. His 
father was W. M. Curd, and his grandfather was John Curd, also a 
native of Virginia. The Curd family came to America from Ireland, 
early in the colonial period. John Curd married Elizabeth Lumpkin, 
also a native of Virginia, in 1801, and early in the eighteenth century 
they removed to Tennessee where they spent the remainder of their 
lives. W. M. Curd was only a child when his parents removed to 
Tennessee, and he received his education in Wilson county, where they 
settled. On the 22nd of November, 1832, he married Susan Davis, a 
daughter of N. G. Davis, and his wife, who was a Miss McFarland, both 
natives of Virginia, who were early settlers in Tennessee and spent all 
of their lives in the state of their adoption. Mr. and Mrs. Curd became 
the parents of four children, of whom two are now living; J. N. Curd 
and his sister, Bettie, who is the widow of W. C. Dodson, and is living in 
Davidson county. Both the father and mother were members of the 
Baptist church and Mr. Curd was a member of the Democratic party. 
He died when a comparatively young man, in 1842. 

J. N. Curd grew up in the country and attended the country schools 
until he had advanced far enough to go away to school. He was then 
sent to Union University, at Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and later matricu- 
lated in the University of Nashville, where he took a course in medicine. 
He was graduated from this institution in 1867, but before receiving his 
degree he had been engaged in the practice of his profession, for during 
the days of the conflict between the states, there was a crying need for 
anyone who had any pretensions of a knowledge of medicine. He 
enlisted in the army in 1862 and served throughout the rest of the war 
as a surgeon in the Confederate army, surrendering with the rest of 
General Johnston's army to General Sherman, at Goldsboro, North Caro- 
lina, in 1865. After the close of the war Dr. Curd became a full-fledged 
physician and with the experience he had gained on the battlefield it 
was not long before he had established a fine practice. He was thus 
engaged for fifteen years and then concluded to retire from the pro- 
fession and settled as a farmer in Wilson county, Tennessee, near Mount 
Juliet. He secured, partly by inheritance and partly by purchase, a 



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1394 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

large farm and has since built a fine home, and is living what is con- 
sidered by wise people the happiest life of the times, that is, that of 
a farmer who is well enough educated to enjoy interests outside of his 
farm, and is prosperous enough to have the comforts and luxuries 
ordinarily denied to the farmer. His farm contains four hundred and 
thirty acres and is one of the best kept up farms in the community. 

Dr. Curd is a member of the Baptist church, and votes the Demo- 
cratic ticket as a rule, though he prefers to vote independently when 
occasion demands. During his professional life he was a member of 
the county medical association and he also served for eight years as 
school commissioner. 

In 1873 Dr. Curd was married to Ella W. Winter, a daughter of 
Dr. A. J. Winter, who was a physician in Wilson county for a number 
of years. Mrs. Curd died in 1887, five children being bom of the 
marriage. Of these, three are living: Elmer, who is a merchant in 
Wilson county ; Edgar, who lives with his father, and May, who married 
Orvie Hassey, of Davidson county, Tennessee. In 1889 Dr. Curd married 
Mary Cook, a daughter of Dr. L. M. N. Cook, who was also a physician 
and had practiced in Wilson county for years. Dr. and Mrs. Curd 
are the parents of one child, Helen, who is at school in Murfreesboro. 
Mrs. Curd is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. • The doctor 
has never had very much time to spend in fraternal affairs, his member- 
ship in the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons being his sole allegiance 
of this kind. 

Milton H. Wells, M. D. The medical fraternity of Wilson county 
has one of its ablest members in Dr. Milton H. Wells, of Watertown, 
where he is city physician, and where during his practice and residence 
he has taken an active part in public affairs, and has gained the thorough 
esteem of his professional associates and all classes of citizens. 

The Wells family, to which he belongs, was first settled in Overton 
county, and its name has been associated with local history of that 
vicinity for upwards of a century. Milton H. Wells was born in Over- 
ton county August 11, 1863, a son of Mitchell and Minerva (Matthews) 
Wells. The paternal grandparents were named Stephen and Nancy 
(West) Wells. The former was a native of North Carolina, whence he 
came to Tennessee at an early day. The latter was born in Overton 
county, and belonged to an early family settled there. The grandfather 
died in 1875 after a long and successful career. 

Both Mr. Wells and wife were natives of Overton county, where the 
father was bom in 1831 and died in 1882, and the mother was born 
in 1833 and died in 1901. Mr. Wells was an expert machinist. He had 
studied medicine for a time, but decided not to follow that profession, 
chiefly on account of ill health. During the war he entered the service 
of the Confederacy and held the rank of lieutenant for one year, until 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1395 

his honorable discharge. He was for a number of years a justice of 
the peace, and took considerable interest in Democratic politics, although 
he never held any other office outside of the one just mentioned. He 
was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, while his wife 
was a Baptist. 

Milton H. Wells attended for a time the Oak Hill Institute in Over- 
ton county, and after his early school days he identified himself with 
several lines of business in this part of the state. Finally, on determin- 
ing to enter the medical profession, he became a student in the medical 
department of the University of Nashville, where he was graduated with 
the degree of M. D. in 1901. He began practice in Overton county, 
where he remained until 1911, at which time he came to Wilson county 
and located near Watertown. For a number of years Dr. Wells taught 
school, and it was from the savings of this occupation that later he 
attended medical school and fitted himself for practice. He is city health 
officer of Watertown, is insurance examiner for two companies, and is 
the owner of a good farm in Overton county and ha^ other investments. 
Though he has had to work for all that he has obtained, and has deserved 
all his good profits, he acquired many evidences of esteem and success, 
and is one of the best known men in the town. 

In 1891 Dr. Wells married Miss Amelia Thomas, of Overton county, 
a daughter of J. C. Thomas, who was one of the successful farmers of 
that county. Mrs. Wells is a member of the Christian church, while 
his church is the Cumberland Presbyterian. Fraternally he is affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Modem Woodmen 
of America, and in the former order has passed all the chairs and has 
served as district deputy; he is also a member of Comer Lodge, F. & 
A. M. He has membership in the Wilson County Medical Society, 
the Upper Cumberland Medical Society, the Tennessee Medical Society, 
and the Southern Medical Association, while in politics he is a good 
Democrat. 

Wn-Lis M. LrrcHFOBD. The cashier of the City and State Bank at 
Watertown is one of the younger generation of a family which has been 
identified with Tennessee for the greater part of a century. He is a 
prospering young business man with growing influence, and his talents, 
which were first turned to educational work, have found a very attrac- 
tive field in business and finance. Willis M. Litchford was born in 
Smith county, Tennessee, August 30, 1889. His parents were Britt T. 
and Laura (Thomas) Litchford. The family was originally from 
Vii^nia, and were located in Tennessee early in the last century. Both 
the parents were natives of Smith county, the father born in 1862 and 
the mother in 1858. The father has long been a successful farmer, and 
his estate in Smith county is estimated to be worth $40,000, and he is 
also interested in the Citizens' Bank of Watertown, one of its directors. 



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1396 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

and an influential man in both civic and business affairs. There are 
five living children in the family, Willis M. being the oldest. The others 
are as follows: Mary, Frank, Thomas and Julian, all of whom reside 
at home. The mother is a member of the Methodist church, while the 
father is a Mason and in politics a Democrat. The paternal grand- 
father was David Litchford, who was born in Davidson county, Ten- 
nessee, where he became a very prosperous citizen, and at the time of 
his death was said to be worth about $75,000. During the Civil war 
he had served as a Confederate soldier under General Forrest, and 
while following that gallant cavalryman was captured and saw many 
hardships of military life. The maternal grandfather was named Frank 
Thomas, who was born in Tennessee, in which state he spent most of his 
life, and he was a soldier, both of the Mexican and the Civil wars, being 
on the Union side in the latter. While a successful man in business, he 
was perhaps more prominent in politics. He was one of the leading 
Republicans of his time, and was chairman of the Republican state 
committee several times, and also served in the office of the United 
States marshal for the middle Tennessee district. 

Willis M. Litchford received his education at Watertown, and as a 
schoolboy showed unusual brilliance in his studies, so that he graduated 
with first honors from the high school in 1910. He then took examinations 
as a school teacher and was given a life certificate on account of his 
passing the best examination in this state. He was a member of the 
County Historical Association, and has always been interested in local 
affairs. For fifteen months he was engaged in teaching school and then 
in 1912 assisted in the organization of the Citizens' State Bank at 
Watertown. This bank has already shown an unusual record of pros- 
perity, and with its capital of $20,000 and its average deposits of $10,000, 
has afforded an excellent service to the business and financial community 
and patronage which it represents. 

Mr. Litchford is cashier, and also one of the directors of this bank. 
In 1912, he was married to Miss Prudie Armstrong, a daughter of 
Lucius Armstrong. Her father is a farmer in Wilson county. Mrs. 
Litchford is a member of the Presbyterian church, while Mr. Litchford 
is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America and in politics is a 
Democrat. 

Robert H. Baker, M. D. A family which has been resident in Ten- 
nessee for more than a century is represented by Dr. Baker of Water- 
town, in Wilson county. Its members have been farmers, business and 
professional men and soldiers; have helped create wealth and prosperity, 
and have always been men of ''honest and good report." It is one of 
the families which preeminently deserve mention in the annals of 
Tennessee. 

Dr. Robert H. Baker was bom in Davidson county, Tennessee, June 
1, 1847, a son of William D. and Mary (Fuqua) Baker. The paternal 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1397 

grandparents were James and Annie (Saunders) Baker, who came from 
North Carolina to Tennessee, and were married in Stewart county, this 
state, in 1811. The paternal grandmother attained the great age of 
ninety-eight years. The grandfather bought a large quantity of land 
near NashviUe in 1811, and during the remainder of his career was 
known as one of the large land proprietors and successful men of the 
vicinity. He was also owner of many slaves. 

William D. Baker, the father, was born in 1812, in this state, and 
died in 1890. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary Puqua, was born 
in Davidson county, this state, in 1811, and died in 1893. Her father, 
Peter Fuqua, came to Tennessee from Virginia, being a minister of the 
Missionary Baptist church. With his ability as a minister, he also 
united executive talent in business, and was considered a wealthy man 
at the time of his death. WiUiam D. Baker became a successful farmer, 
and also entered actively into the political life of his county. For a num- 
ber of years he was tax collector of Davidson county, and then for twenty- 
four years served as a magistrate in the same county. His resignation 
from the latter office was due to ill health. There were eight children 
in his family, and two of them are living at present, one being the doctor ; 
the other, W. T. Baker, was for eight years judge of the city court of 
Nashville. The sons, James F., W. T., Frank M. and R. H., were all 
soldiers in the Civil war; Frank was killed in battle in 1864, while under 
the command of General John H. Moi^an. The father was a Union man, 
though all four of his sons gave service to the Confederacy. The parents 
were both members of the Christian church, and the father was a Demo- 
crat in politics. 

Dr. Robert H. Baker, who has for forty years been one of the leading 
physicians of Wilson county, received his educational training in the 
University of Nashville, where he was graduated in the literary depart- 
ment in 1868, and was graduated in medicine in 1873. He began prac- 
tice in the same year and some years later, during 1880 and 1881, took 
a post-graduate course in medicine in Cincinnati. He has always been 
a physician who has endeavored to keep pace with the developments of 
his time and has striven with marked success to render his services 
efficient and valuable at all times to his large circle of patients. 

In November, 1875, Dr. Baker married Mary Waters, whose father, 
Hon. Wilson L. Waters of Watertown, at one time member of the Ten- 
nessee legislature, was one of the ablest business men of this locality, 
and both for his wealth and his influence in other ways, was widely 
known in this part of Tennessee. By reason of his industry and pro- 
gressive activities and his eagerness to advance the interests of his com- 
munity and state, he was selected by the officials and a large concourse of 
people to cast the first shovelful of dirt in the construction of the Ten- 
nessee Central Railroad, which work began at Watertown, named in 
his honor. The six children of Dr. and Mrs. Baker are as follows: 

Vol. V— 1.1 



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1398 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Charles W., of Nashville ; Laura, wife of T. L. Hale, a dentist at Water- 
town ; Mary, at home ; Ellen Waters, at home ; Robert H., Jr., at home ; 
and Mildred, also at home. The family are members of the Christian 
church. 

Dr. Baker was very young at the beginning of the Civil war, but as 
his sympathies were with the Confederacy, and as his brothers were 
already in rank, in 1863 he enlisted and saw active service in a number 
of engagements and hard campaigns. He was escort for General Pettus 
for some time and was twice captured, but each time made his escape. 
An Independent Democrat, Dr. Baker was nominated on the Inde- 
pendent Democratic ticket for the state legislature, but was defeated 
by a small majority. He is a member of the county and state medical 
societies and of the American Medical Association. 

Walter Malone, the youngest of a family of twelve children, is a 
son of Dr. Franklin Jefferson Malone and Mary Louise (Hardin), his 
wife. He was bom February 10, 1866, in De Soto county, Mississippi, 
about thirteen miles southeast of Memphis, Tennessee. 

His father, a surgeon in the Mexican war, and a member of the Mis- 
sissippi Constitutional Convention in 1868, died January 24, 1873. The 
death of his father in his son's childhood, deprived him of many early 
advantages, but he managed to receive those which a country school 
offered. 

From the age of six to sixteen he made his daily trips of three miles, 
across the state line, into Tennessee to the little schoolhouse. This 
brought him in close contact with nature. When ♦the school session was 
over, he worked on the farm, and here found form for the products 
which were stored in his mind. His first attempt to record them in 
verse was at the age of twelve ; but these youthful effusions his, perhaps, 
over-critical judgment consigned to destruction. 

Between the ages of thirteen and fourteen, he was encouraged by 
the publication of several of his poems in the Louisville Caurier- Journal. 
So, at the age of sixteen, he began writing verse in earnest, and, in 1882, 
gave out his. first volume, '*Claribel and Other Poems,'* to the public. 
This was a book of three hundred pages, savoring of rural life, and 
giving promise of poetic genius. This book was greatly admired and 
highly commended by many; but in later years its author must have 
regarded it with disapproval, for he sought to destroy every copy he 
could find. 

In 1883 he entered the preparatory department of the University of 
Mississippi at Oxford. Though he had read much, he had never devoted 
himself assiduously to elementary text books. His life had been one of 
freedom in nature's realm, and hence it was with difficulty that he 
entered upon collegiate work. Mathematics was to him especially dis- 
tasteful. However, his last years at college were eminently noteworthy. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1399 

He won laurels in two oratorical contests, and served three years on 
the editorial staff of the college magazine — the last year as editor in chief. 

In 1885, at the age of nineteen, he published another volume, '*The 
Outcast and Other Poems,*' a book of three hundred pages. This book 
elicited favorable coriiment from such poets as Edmund Clarence Sted- 
man, Oliver Wendell Holmes and others; but this volume, too, the author 
later sought to suppress. Whittier said of it, *'The book gives promise, 
but it is not what it would be were the author ten years older. Why, 
at that age I could not make a respectable rhyme." However, despite 
Mr. Malone's efforts to destroy them, these early volumes are still being 
read and enjoyed. Some of their poems, altered and recast, are found 
in his later works. The author's objection to his early works is that 
they were given out at a time when he did not know the way of the world. 

In 1887 he graduated and was admitted to the bar several years 
later. Making Memphis his home, he formed a co-partnership with his 
brother, James H. Malone, afterward mayor of Memphis. Realizing 
that the law is a jealous mistress, he now devoted himself assiduously 
to it, and his pen was idle until the year 1892, when his best work began. 
** Narcissus and Other Poems" appeared, attracting widespread atten- 
tion. Two years later came *' Songs of Dusk and Dawn." This volume 
contained many new poems, together with some of the best of his pre- 
ceding volume. It was generally commended as a work of high art, and 
Col. M. W. Connolly of Memphis, in one of his inimitable editorials, 
paid its author a high tribute. 

In 1896 followed ** Songs of December and June," a little volume of 
twenty lyrics, and *'The Coming of the King," a year later, a collection 
of eight short stories. This book received high praise from the press, 
and from writers like Thomas Bailey Aldrich, Charles Dudley Warner, 
Edgar Fawcett, and others. 

In 1897 Mr. Malone retired from the practice of law and went to New 
York City, where he engaged in literary pursuits, contributing to leading 
magazines and weeklies. Several years later he returned to Memphis, 
and resumed the practice of law. 

In 1900 he published *' Songs of North and South," a volume con- 
taining the garnered work of the three preceding years. This excellent 
volume brought him to the notice of Israel Zangwill, Alfred Austin, and 
the British and Scotch reviews. 

In 1904 his book entitled *' Poems" came out. This was a complete 
edition of all his poems, many of them re-written and revised. In 
1906 appeared his latest book, ** Songs of East and West," a volume of 
twenty -seven poems containing word pictures of travels in California, 
Florida, Mexico, Cuba and Europe. 

His most widely quoted poem, ** Opportunity, " first appeared in 
Munsey's Magazine in March, 1905. This poem has received many re- 
prints in all English-speaking countries. It has been framed by lovers 



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1400 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

of art, and may be seen not only on the walls of the homes, but in many 
public places. It is generally believed that this poem was written in 
response to the pessimistic ''Opportunity'' of Senator John J. Ingalls; 
but this is not the fact, although the poem is uplifting and presents a 
phase of the subject diametrically opposed to the view of that author. 
It is light and cheer to the despondent, comfort to the bereaved and a 
helping hand to the downtrodden. 

In 1905, on petition of practically all the members of the Memphis 
bar, Mr. Malone was appointed judge of the second division of the cir- 
cuit court of Shelby county, Tennessee, by Governor John I. Cox, and, 
by election, has held the office ever since, for he is exceedingly popular 
in politics and has many friends. As a jurist he has attained marked 
eminence, for he has a phenomenal knowledge of law and is a man of 
wonderful versatility. 

In his writings there is no tinge of commercialism, for he is an 
advocate of true art. The utilitarian idea has never entered his mind. 
He has fought his way to fame against popular fads and capricious 
fashions. While all of his work has been in a serious vein. Judge Malone 
is not austere or exclusive. He has his sunny moments, and is genial, 
cheerful and often generous to a fault. He has taken the language of 
the flowers, the birds and the trees and made it popular. In him they 
speak to you their varied language, and you hear their voices and are 
made glad. 

Besides his poems and short stories, he has written three plays: '*Poe 
and Chopin," a mystical and subjective study; *'The Valley of the 
Shadow,'' a drama based on the yellow fever scourge of 1878 in Memphis. 
This is a sociological study, advancing a bold plea for the women of the 
underworld — one of whom is its heroine. "Sam Davis" is a war drama, 
replete with the spirit of loyalty and patriotism. 

With Judge Malone 's patient waiting have come appreciation and 
success. His fame is made, though he is still working on his epic, 
'*De Soto," which he began in January, 1908, and will complete this 
year. This bold eflfort is being produced in the measure of ''Paradise 
Lost," and will contain about eighteen thousand lines. It recounts the 
adventures of that intrepid cavalier in the early days of the Americas, 
adorning his history with many bright flowers of fiction. Some of its 
lyric interludes have been published in Scnbner's Magazine, Munsey's 
Magazine, The Smart Set, and other leading magazines. Judge Malone 
has said that this story was a conception of his early youth, the dream 
of his young manhood, and now, in his maturer years, he will give it out 
as a finished product of masterful effort and genius. 

Many of Judge Malone 's best poems have been published in com- 
pilations of southern literature. An excellent selection is found in 
''The Library of Southern Literature," which also contains the best 
written account of his life from the virile pen of Col. M. W» Con- 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1401 

nolly, himself a poet and newspaper writer of renown, and the present 
editor of the News-Scimitar of Memphis. There is also a short but 
choice collection of his poems found in '* Southern Writers/' by W. P. 
Trent, published in 1905. 

With the completion of **De Soto" Judge Malone has said that he 
wiU be ready to die, but he is not yet an old man by any means, and it 
is to be hoped that his pen w^ll continue active for many years to come. 

Edward Bushrod Stahlman is one of the men whom American 
business has rewarded with high position and influence. He began life 
a poor boy, working not only for his own support but for his family. 
He went into railroading and learned that complex industry from the 
ground up, becoming an impersonation of efficiency in the management 
of both men and practical things. He attained one of the high executive 
positions on a great railroad, and was one of the big men of the South 
in transportation circles until his retirement some fifteen years ago. Mr. 
Stahlman is a Tennesseean by virtue of his many years' residence in 
Nashville, and is now perhaps best kno>vn as publisher of the Nashville 
Daily Banner, 

He was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, September 2, 1844, a son 
of Frederick and Christiane (Lange) Stahlman. His father was an 
educator and principal of the schools at Leuso, Germany, where the son 
received his elementary education. The family came to America and 
located in Virginia in 1855. The father's death soon afterward left 
the widow with seven young children, and Edward w^as called into 
practical service to help support the home. 

His career in the railway service began in an humble capacity dur- 
ing the construction of the Parkersburg branch of the Baltimore & 
Ohio Railroad. He was a hard worker and had the personality of a 
real leader, so that he was soon placed in charge of responsible duties. 
In 1863, at the age of nineteen, he came to Tennessee to enter the service 
of the Louisville & Nashville, and in 1865 located at Nashville, which 
city has been his home for the greater part of half a century. Here he 
was cashier of the Southern Express Company for several years. In 
1871 he became freight contracting agent at Nashville for the Louisville 
& Nashville Railroad, and in 1875 was appointed general agent at Nash- 
ville. He was made general freight agent in 1878 and traffic manager 
in 1880. Resigning in 1881, he became vice president of the Louisville, 
New Albany & Chicago Railroad, a position which he resigned to accept 
the same office with the Louisville & Nashville, with which road he 
remained until 1890. After spending about a year in Europe with his 
family, he became commissioner of the Southern Railway & Steamship 
Association, with headquarters at Atlanta, Georgia, and continued 
actively in the transportation service until October, 1895. 

At Nashville Mr. Stahlman has been one of the citizens to whom 



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1402 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

credit is due for the modern era of growth and commercial enterprise. 
One of the features of the modern business district is the Stahlman 
ofSce building, and his energy and capital have gone into many other 
enterprises that have promoted the prosperity of the city. Mr. Stahlman 
is both the owner and publisher of the Nashville Daily Banner. 

Thomas Polk Ewing. Not only is Thomas Polk Ewing a young man 
of eminence in Montgomery countj% but he is one who has been known 
from infancy in this community, which was his birthplace. It has been 
his privilege to serve his district in a prominent political capacity, doing 
great credit to the family reputation. The Ewings came out of Ken- 
tucky to Missouri. Thompson Ewing, the paternal grandfather of our 
subject, was a native of Kentucky, whence he removed to ^Missouri. His 
name is well known indeed in the Cumberland Presbyterian church, in 
which he was conspicuous as founder. The major part of his life was 
spent in Missouri, which was the birthplace of his son. Finis Ewing 
(1838-1906). The latter was given a good education, and came, at the 
age of twenty, to the state of Tennessee, where he established himself 
in Montgomery county. He was twice married, first to Miss Delnia 
Barker, who bore him one child, but soon afterward passed from earthly 
life. This child, a daughter named Ella, lived to maturity and is well 
known as Mrs. T. C. Nimms, of Nashville. Finis Ewing later was 
united to Miss Frances Douglas Polk, a daughter of Irving and Eliza- 
beth Polk, who were Robertson county farmers. Frances Polk Ewing 
was born in 1850 and is still living. She and her husband became the 
parents of seven children, six of whom are yet living. The eldest, 
Charles Bowman Ewing, lives at Nashville ; Finis, the second child and 
son, is a citizen of Memphis; Bessie is deceased; Maude is Mrs. Leslie 
Smith and resides at this place; Thomas Polk Ewing, as the special 
subject of this review, receives detailed account below; Robert Lee 
Ewing lives at Memphis; and Polly Douglas Ewing became Mrs. B. A. 
Martin of near Clarksville. 

Thomas Polk Ewing was born on April 19, 1883, at the rural property 
in District No. 1 of Montgomery county which is still his home. He 
received careful education in the academy at Cumberland City and there- 
after entered upon the occupation of farming, conducting and supervising 
operations on his father *s farm; for that gentleman was concerned 
somewhat in political affairs, in the capacity of district magistrate, which 
office he filled for no less than twenty-five years, showing in his efforts 
in the cause of peace no less patriotism than he had exhibited as a soldier 
of the Civil war. 

As an agriculturist of extensive operations, T. P. Ewing has shown 
no slight executive and managing ability. He manages four hundred 
acres, chiefly devoted to tobacco raising, and also raises considerable 
stock. Meanwhile he has achieved a most substantial reputation as one 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1403 

who knows how to serve his Democratic constituency and the local 
public in general in various civic and political offices. From 1906 to 
1912 he filled the office formerly honored so many years by his late 
father, the magistracy of District No. 1. For two years he was a 
member of the Montgomery county highway commission and for a 
similar period of the county board of education. He has been a member 
of the Tennessee legislature as a representative from Houston and 
Montgomery counties and is again a candidate for the same office from 
Montgomery county. While in the legislature he has served on the 
committee on banking, the committee on agriculture, the committee on 
county lines, the committee on railroads and the committee on game, 
fish and forestry; he has also been chairman of the committee on new 
counties and the committee on investigating state mines. Mr. Ewing 
has an especial gift for official service and has been prominent as chair- 
man of the Planters' Association. 

Mr. Ewing maintains his home at his rural property. His marriage 
took place on November 8, 1911. Mrs. Ewing was formerly Miss Helen 
Dodds, of Jackson, Tennessee. She is a daughter of J. S. Dodds, of that 
place. Mr. and Mrs. Ewing are the parents of an infant son, Thomas 
Polk Ewing, Jr., born August 7, 1912. 

The church affiliations of Mr. and Mrs. Ewing are, respectively, those 
of the Episcopal and Methodist Episcopal, South. Mr. Ewing is fra- 
ternally connected with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
the Loyal Order of Moose, and the Junior Order of United American 
Mechanics. He is a man whose talents and personality have won him 
considerable popularity, which promises to increase and to win for him 
wider opportunities for public usefulness. 

Norman B. Morrell. Engaged in the successful practice of his pro- 
fession in the city of Knoxville for the past twenty years, Senator 
Morrell is recognized as one of the able and representative members of 
the bar of eastern Tennessee and is now representing Knox county as 
a member of the state senate. He has secure vantage place in the con- 
fidence and esteem of the people of his home city and county and as a 
citizen manifests his loyalty to every interest that touches upon the wel- 
fare of the community. 

Hon. Norman B. ^Morrell was born in the city of Little Rock, Arkan- 
sas, on the tenth of Februarj% 1870, and is a son of Rev. Henry H. 
Morrell, D. D., and his wife, Mary E. (Badger) Morrell, both of whom 
were born and reared in Ohio, in which state their respective families 
were founded in an early day, and with the civic and material history 
of which the names of both families have been closely identified. Rev. 
Henry H. Morrell, D. D., was a distinguished member of the clergy 
of the Protestant Episcopal church, and within the course of his long 
and consecrated life and service he held important pastorates in various 



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1404 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

dioceses of the church. From 1881 to 1886 he was rector of St. John's 
church, in Knoxville, and here, as elsewhere, his memory is revered 
by all who came within the sphere of his gracious and benign influence. 
He died in 1889, his devoted wife having preceded him in the year 1876. 
Five of their children, three sons and two daughters, are now living. 

Senator Morrell is indebted to the public schools of Ohio and Ten- 
nessee for his early educational discipline, and he had the further 
advantage of a home of distinctive culture and influence. He attended 
the University of Tennessee for two years, and in preparation for his 
chosen profession he entered the law department of the celebrated Uni- 
versity of Michigan, and in that institution he was graduated with the 
class of 1893 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. Prior to the pursuit 
of his college career, however, it may be mentioned that Senator Morrell 
was employed for three years in the offices of the Knoxville Iron Com- 
pany, and one year with the Mingo Mountain Coal & Coke Company. 

Soon after he was graduated from the University of Michigan, the 
young man was admitted to the Tennessee bar, and since that time he 
has been engaged in the practice of his profession in the city of Knox- 
ville, where he has built up a large and representative law practice and 
been concerned in much of the important litigation of the various courts. 
He is associated in a professional way with Charles Seymour, and is 
broadly recognized as one of the leading land and title lawyers in 
Knox county. 

Mr. Morrell never aspired to political office until he announced his 
candidacy for the office of state senator in 1912, being elected by a large 
majority in November of that year. He has ever given a splendid 
allegiance to the Eepublican party, and has rendered effective service 
to the party on many occasions. His heavy majority at the polls in 
November was especially pleasing in view of the overwhelming Demo- 
cratic landslide that attended the election throughout the country. Mr. 
Morrell presented resolutions in the Republican county executive com- 
mittee meeting in 1912, which were passed, endorsing William H. Taft, 
R. W. Austin and the Republican party. 

Mr. Morrell was one of the organizers of the Bell House Boys' 
Association, and was made its first president. He has long shown a most 
praiseworthy interest in the public school system of his city, and has 
done good work in that department of civic activity. He was the first 
secretary of the Knoxville Water Commission, and served most acceptably 
in that capacity for a number of years. He was also secretary of the 
charter committee of citizens that drafted the charter for the commis- 
sion form of government of Knoxville, and has in many another equally 
telling way manifested his splendid citizenship and his interest in the 
development and progress of his city. 

Mr. Morrell holds membership in the Knox County Bar Association 
and the Tennessee Bar Association, and is likewise affiliated with the 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1405 

Boyal Arcanum, and both he and his wife are zealous members of St. 
John's church, Protestant Episcopal, of which he is junior warden and 
On October 10, 1900, Mr. Morrell was united in marriage with Miss 
of which his father was formerly rector. 

Mary Ogden, daughter of James E. and Elise Porta Ogden. Mr. Ogden 
is a native of the Buckeye state and Mrs. Ogden of Brazil, from whence 
they, came to Tennessee in their earlier years. The father has for 
many years been prominent as a railroad man. Three children have 
been bom to Senator and Mrs. Morrell: John 0., Elise Emma and 
James Robinson. The attractive family home, widely known for its 
gracious and open-handed hospitality, is located at 1925 Caledonia 
street, in this city. 

John H. Frantz, as one of the senior members of the law firm of 
Cornick, Frantz. McConnell & Seymour, of Knoxville, Tennessee, is too 
well known both in professional and social circles to need further com- 
ment. He has been engaged in the practice of his profession in the city 
for a number of years and during this time has built up an enviable 
reputation as a lawyer who does not stoop to underhand dealings and 
who respects his profession too greatly to drag it down, as have so many 
of the fraternity. That such a standard has not prevented him from 
attaining success is shown by the large clientele which he has always had. 

John H. Frantz is one of a family of nine children, whose parents 
were T. P. Frantz and Sarah (Petit) Frantz, both of whom are now dead. 
John H. Frantz was bom in 1869, on the 15th of February, in the 
state of Virginia. He received his elementary education in the public 
schools of the state and later attended Central College, Missouri. His 
law studies were pursued at the University of Tennessee,, from which he 
was graduated with the class of 1894, and he immediately entered upon 
the practice of his profession. He has been exclusively engaged in the 
general practice of law since that time, for many years as a member of 
the firm of Cornick, Frantz & McConnell. In 1912 Charles Milne Sey- 
mour was admitted to the firm and the name was changed to its present 
reading. The other members of the firm are Howard Comick and 
Thomas G. McConnell. Their beautiful suite of five oflSces is located on 
the fourth floor of the East Tennessee National Bank building. 

In politics Mr. Frantz is a stanch Democrat and an active supporter 
of his party. He is a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons 
and is very popular in the social life of the city, being a member of the 
Country Club, the Cherokee Club and the University Club of Knoxville. 

Maj. Thomas Shapard Webb. Famous among the law firms of the 
city of Knoxville, Tennessee, stands that of Webb & Baker. Major 
Webb, the senior member of this firm, is perhaps one of the best known 
men in Knoxville, and, in fact, in eastern Tennessee. For forty-four 



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1406 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

years he has been a practitioner in Knoxville, and the record that he 
has made as an upright lawyer and one who is unafraid is only equaled 
by the record that he made as a soldier in the Civil war. 

Thomas Shapard Webb was bom on the 26th of September, 1840, in 
Haywood county, Tennessee, the son of James L. Webb and Ariana 
(Shapard) Webb. He was one of a family of eleven children and was 
reared from infancy in Memphis, Tennessee. After completing his ele^ 
mentary education in the Memphis schools he was sent to Bin^am 
School, in North Carolina, a famous old school even then. He later at- 
tended the University of North Carolina, at Chapel Hill, but in April, 
1861, during his junior year, he left the university to enter the Confed- 
erate service. 

He enlisted at Memphis as a private in Company G of the One Hun- 
dred and Fifty-fourth Tennessee Regiment, but was almost immediately 
elected first lieutenant, and it was as a lieutenant that he took part in 
the occupation of Columbus, Kentucky, and in the battle of Belmont. 
Early in 1862 his regiment fell back to Corinth, and then followed the 
terrific two-days' battle of Shiloh. When General Beauregard evacuated 
Corinth, Lieutenant Webb had the misfortune to be captured, and the 
circumstances of his capture were such that he was reported dead, and 
consequently lost his rank in the regiment. He was held a prisoner at 
Johnson's Island until September, 1862, and ias soon as he was released, 
after an exchange at Vicksburg, he hastened to report for duty to General 
Polk, at Knoxville. It is not hard to imagine the surprise with which this 
resurrection of one supposed to be dead was greeted. General Polk 
placed the young officer on detached duty, and he remained in Knoxville 
until July, 1863, when he received orders to report to General Forrest. 
To serve with this dashing cavalry leader was the ambition of many a 
boy in gray, and it must have been a joy to Major Webb when he re- 
ceived those orders. General Forrest detailed him with two other men 
to raise cavalry and organize the Sixteenth Tennessee Cavalry, of which 
company Lieutenant Webb was commissioned major. Under the com- 
mand of General Forrest, Major Webb now served with his regiment in 
the engagement at Collierville, Tennessee, and in the famous battle of 
Tishomingo Creek, or Brice's Cross-Roads. In this last battle he fell with 
a wound in the ankle that prevented him from seeing any more active 
service for about a year. Upon rejoining Forrest he took part in Wil- 
son's raid in the spring of 1865, and shortly after this fought his last 
fight at Scottsville, Alabama. He surrendered with his regiment at 
Gainesville, Alabama. 

, After the war he returned to his neglected studies and completed his 
preparation for the bar in Memphis. He passed his examinations and 
was admitted to the i)ar in 1867. He immediately began the practice 
of his profession and has continued since that time, being conspicuously 
successful. In 1869 he came to Knoxville to live and has been a resident 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 4107 

of that city ever since. As experience came to the aid of legal knowledge, 
Major Webb's reputation as a brilliant and dependable attorney in- 
creased, and he is acknowledged throughout the state as one of the 
authorities on various legal questions. He has several times had the 
honor of sitting as a special judge on the bench of the supreme court. 
The firm of Webb & Baker was formed on October 1, 1908, and their 
offices are in the Holston National Bank building. 

Major Webb was married in February, 1867, to Miss Blanche Mc- 
Clung, of Knoxville. She died on October 15, 1894. On the 11th of 
August, 1897, Major Webb was again married, his wife being Mary 
Polk, a daughter of Col. Henry C. Yeatman, of Hamilton place, Ashwood, 
Tennessee. 

Jacob Lytton Thomas. Those successful business men who have 
left the impress of their abilities upon the commercial history of Knox- 
ville have been, almost without exception, men of affairs, with little 
instruction in science. They have stepped from the counter or office 
to the management of large interests, demonstrating their fitness to be 
leaders by soundness'of judgment and skill in management. Such a man 
the generation of business men now passing from the scenes of active 
business recognized in Jacob Lytton Thomas when he came to Knoxville 
in 1874, and at once became a leader in business among those who had 
already reached high rank as merchants. His subsequent career was one 
of great activity in commercial circles, and in his death, which occurred 
September 24, 1906, the city lost a man who had done much to add to 
its prestige and importance. 

Jacob Lytton Thomas was born in Nashville, Tennessee, December 3, 
1840, one of the seven children of Jesse and Elizabeth (Lytton) Thomas. 
He received good educational advantages, attending the public schools 
and the University of Nashville, and after his graduation from the 
latter institution, in 1861, enlisted in the Confederate army for service 
during the Civil war. His military career covered a period of three 
years, and his faithful service gave promise of a characteristic that was 
to mark his after life — absolute devotion to every duty imposed on him. 
On his return, Mr. , Thomas began his business career with the well- 
known Nashville firm of Gardner, Buckner & Company, with which 
he was connected until 1872, when he joined his brother and embarked 
in the dry goods business, the firm being known as the Morgan-Thomas 
Company of Nashville. In 1874 he severed his connection with the 
above firm and came to Knoxville, where he entered the wholesale dry 
goods business, in connection with Cowan, McClung & Company. Dur- 
ing the remainder of his career, Mr. Thomas continued to be identified 
with this concern, one of the oldest and largest firms in the city, dealing 
in wholesale dry goods, notions and furnishings. As a member of Knox- 
ville 's coterie of leading business men, Mr. Thomas ever showed himself 



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1408 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

to be the self-contained man of business, whose word was unimpeach- 
able, whose fidelity was unquestioned, whose judgment of men and 
affairs was instinctive, one who had attained, by inimitable methods, a 
competence which he neither hoarded with avarice nor scattered with 
prodigal ostentation, but enjoyed reasonably, dispensed providently and 
shared generously. By temperament he was disinclined to public life, 
but took a good citizen's interest in all matters that affected his com- 
munity, and in political matters supported Democratic principles and 
candidates. He was not indifferent to the social amenities, and was 
well known in Masonry, in which he had attained to the Knights Templar 
degree. 

On June 5, 1873, Mr. Thomas was united in marriage with Miss 
Lucy McClung, Ihe daughter of Charles J. McClung, and seven children 
were born to this union, of whom five survive, namely: Jesse, who 
resides at No. 804 West Main street; Hugh M., whose residence is at 
No. 1622 Rose avenue; and Charles M., Matt 6. and Miss Margaret, who 
reside with their mother at the beautiful family residence. No. 504 West 
Main street, Knoxville. The members of the family are affiliated with 
the Methodist Episcopal church South. The sons are still connected 
with the firm which their father helped develop. 

William Wallace Woodruff. Prominent and widely known as a 
banker and merchant, Mr. Woodruff has been identified with the city 
of Knoxville for upwards of half a century. In that time he has attained 
a high position in business affairs, while his judgment and integrity 
have long been honored by his associates and he has also given much 
disinterested service that has accrued to the best good of the public, in 
positions that share greater burdens of responsibility than rewards of 
honor. He is president of the Woodruff Hardware Company, which 
operates one of the largest stores of its kind in the city. 

William Wallace Woodruff, president of the wholesale hardware 
firm of W. W. Woodruff & Company, is a native son of Kentucky, born 
in the town of Bardstown, on the twenty-first day of March, 1840. He 
is one of the three children born to Ezra and Catherine Woodruff, the 
father having been a well-known manufacturer jit Bardstown. Mr. 
Woodruff gained his early education in the common schools of Louisville, 
Kentucky, and on leaving school began his career in business as a clerk 
in a mercantile establishment. He was just at the outset of his business 
career and a young man of barely twenty-one years when the war broke 
out, and in the early days following the firing upon of Fort Sumter in 
April, 1861, he was appointed adjutant of the Thirteenth Kentucky 
Volunteer Infantry. His service continued to the end of the war, and 
he was discharged in January, 1865. Enlisting as a private, he was 
made adjutant, and during his service promoted to the rank of captain 
of Company D, and he left the service with that rank. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1409 

Upon his return from the front Captain Woodruff located at Knox- 
ville, where he established soon after the wholesale hardware firm of 
which he is now senior member. His business career has had its set- 
backs and its hard times, like that of every successful record of enter- 
prise, but on the whole he has maintained a front rank among the local 
merchants, and is now one of the leading men in the business and 
fiancial affairs of the city of Knoxville. Besides his presidency of the 
concern which bears his name, he is vice president and director of the 
East Tennessee National Bank and the Knoxville Real Estate Company 
and the Knoxville Ice Company. Since 1906 he has led a practically 
retired life, having retired in that year from the close supervision of his 
business, and now turns over the details of management to his junior 
associates. His son, W. W. Woodruflf, Jr., is vice president of the 
company, and an able representative of his honored father in the 
business. 

Mr. Woodruff is president of the board of trustees of the Tennessee 
Deaf and Dumb Institution, as well as president of the Carlson & 
Newman College at Jefferson City, Tennessee, and he and his family 
are communicants of the Baptist church in Knoxville. 

The Baptist church of this city has for a number of years had no 
more liberal member than Captain Woodruff. He is a member of the 
Masonic order and of the Cherokee Country Club, as well as th,e local 
chapter of the Sons of the American Revolution. 

In 1865 Captain Woodruff was united in marriage with Miss Ella 
T. Connelly, a native of Frankfort, Kentucky, and to them eight chil- 
dren were bom, of which number five are yet living. The handsome 
home of the family is located at No. 1401 West Cumberland avenue. 

Colonel Robert Lee Beare. In the personality of Robert Lee Beare 
are combined military talent and mercantile efficiency. Tennessee has 
been his chosen state since 1890 and Jackson his adopted home since 
1906. His native state is Mississippi, and Virginia the nativity of his 
parents. His father, David Sieg Beare, was a jeweler by vocation and 
when he removed from Virginia settled his family and business in Aber- 
deen, Mississippi. His wife was Sarah Taylor, born in Staunton, in the 
Old Dominion state. It was in the early sixties — ^just before the war — 
that David Beare became a resident of Aberdeen, and there it was that 
to him and his wife Sarah the son was born whom they christened 
Robert Lee. His date of birth was December 2, 1864. 

In the public schools of that Mississippi town Robert Lee Beare re- 
ceived his intellectual training. In 1885 he entered the United States 
Signal Corps, to which he gave service for one year. At the end of that 
time he accepted the official position of manager for the Western Union 
Telegraph Company at Aberdeen, Mississippi, his native home. He con- . 
tinned in this capacity until 1895. 



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1410 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

In the meantime Mr. Beare, who is of an enterprising bent, had been 
establishing an ice business at Humboldt, Tennessee. Begun in 1890, 
it had by 1895 reached such proportions that it required the whole at- 
tention of its originator and owner. In the latter year he resigned his 
position with the Western Union Company and proceeded to further 
enlarge his ice manufactory. In 1906 he sold the plant. Removing to 
Jackson, he built a large establishment for the manufacturing of ice. 
This he has since continued to operate, combining with those activities the 
management of a coal and wood business. 

It is of special interest to note the steadily increasing military prom- 
inence of Mr. Beare. In 1903 he was elected captain of Company G in 
the National Guard of the state of Tennessee. In 1906 he was made 
lieutenant-colonel of the Second Regiment in this same body. When, in 
1907, the colonel of that regiment resigned, Robert Lee Beare was ac- 
tively in command. In 1908 the First and Second Regiments were con- 
solidated and Colonel Beare was honored by being retained in command 
of the reorganization. 

City affairs have sought his incumbency of office. In 1910 he was 
elected alderman from the Fourth ward, in Jackson. He served for the 
stated term, but declined to consider re-election, because the multiplicity 
of his other duties was such as to prevent his giving as much time to 
city business as he felt the alderman 's office should require. At reorgan- 
ization of the state he accepted appointment as one of the three election 
commissioners, w^hich office he still holds. 

Col. Beare 's prominence in the business capacity mentioned above, 
added to his membership in the directorate of the Union Bank and Trust 
Company of Jackson and his presidency of the 'Malley-Beare Valve 
Company of Chicago, have made him an especially intelligent president 
of the Merchants' and Manufacturers' Association. In that capacity he 
ser\ed for the term of 1911. As this association is one ruling only one- 
term presidencies, Colonel Beare has retired to general membership in 
it. He is, however, one of the most competent and energetic members in 
this body and in divers other ways lends willing assistance to any move- 
ment or measure that tends to the further development of the city's re- 
sources. 

The political stand which Colonel Beare takes is that of an Indepen- 
dent Democrat. He is a member of various fraternal orders and the 
church connection of himself and his family is with the Methodist branch 
of the church. 

Mrs. Beare — nee IVIary Reiney — is a daughter of the late Col. G. K. 

Reiney, of Humboldt, Tennessee, and a niece of the late Col. F. B. 

Fisher. The marriage of Miss Reiney and Colonel Beare took place in 

1906. They are the parents of two children, a daughter named Mary 

. Hortense and a son called Robert Lee Beare. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1411 

John Minnis Thobnburgh. One of the strongest combinations of 
legal talent in Knoxville is the firm of Powers & Thomburgh, composed of 
J. Pike Powers, Jr., and John M. Thornburgh, whose oflSces are in the 
Empire building. The firm, since its organization in 1905, has had a 
generous share of the practice of office and courts, and its services have 
been employed in many of the important cases during this period 

Mr. Thomburgh, who represents the third generation of the family 
name in connection with the bar and public life in Tennessee, has been 
winning success in the law for the past ten years, and has also gained 
distinction in politics and enjoys many high social connections. 

One of the four children of former Congressman Jacob M. Thorn- 
burgh and his wife, Laura Emma (Pettibone) Thornburgh, John M. 
Thornburgh, of this review, was bom in the city of Knoxville, November 
10, 1881. His father was a son of Montgomery Thomburgh, a prominent 
lawyer of Jefferson county, Tennessee, and was bom in that county on 
July 3, 1837. He died at Knoxville on the 19th day of September, 1890. 
Jacob Montgomery Thornburgh had just been licensed to practice law 
when the Civil war broke out, and he crossed the mountains into Ken- 
tucky in 1861 and joined the Union army. He was afterwards com- 
missioned lieutenant colonel of the Fourth Tennessee Cavalry. He made 
an enviable reputation as a soldier and officer, and was for some time the 
commander of a brigade. He was mustered out in July, 1865, and in 
the following year President Johnson tendered him a major's commis- 
sion in the regular army, which he declined. He was district attorney 
from the third judicial district from 1866 to 1871, and in 1872 he was 
elected to congress, succeeding himself in the office in 1874 and in 1876. 
After retiring from congress he formed a partnership with Judge Qeorge 
Andrews, which continued until the death of Judge Andrews in 1889, 
and his own death followed within a year from that time. He was an 
industrious, popular and successful lawyer, especially noted for his 
ability as an advocate, and his position in political and professional life 
in his time was one of the most secure. His honored father, Montgomery 
Thomburgh, was in his day one of the leading citizens of Knox county, 
where he practiced law and also followed farming, was a member of the 
legislature and served in the office of attorney general of the county. 

John Minnis Thornburgh was educated at Columbia University, New 
York, and at the University of Tennessee, where he was graduated A. B. 
in 1901 and LL. B. in 1902, being valedictorian of his class in the latter 
year. Admitted to the bar to practice in all courts of Tennessee in 1902, 
he was subsequently, on March 8, 1909, admitted to the bar of the 
United States supreme court. From 1903 to 1905 he was connected with 
the firm of Cornick, Wright & Frantz, and in 1905 formed the association 
with Mr. Powers which has proved so successful for both of them. Since 
July, 1911, Mr. Thomburgh has been serving as United States commis- 
sioner. He has been a member of the Knox county Republican executive 



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1412 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

committee since 1906, was a delegate to the state gubernatorial conven- 
tion of 1910, and in the same year was a candidate for the Republican 
nomination to the oflSce of attorney general of Knox county. 

Mr. Thornburgh is a member of the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity and 
the Phi Kappa Phi honor fraternity, and afi&liates with the Knoxville 
Lodge No. 160, B. P. 0. E. ; Council No. 645 of the Knights of Columbus, 
and is a member of the Cotillion Club and the Cherokee Country Club. 
He is a communicant of the Church of the Immaculate Conception. 

Mr. Thornburgh was married on October 11, 1910, to Miss Sara Mat- 
lock, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Matlock, of EiceviUe, Tennessee. 
They have one son, Henry Matlock Thornburgh, born April 30, 1912. 

John E. Robertson. Highly respected both as a citizen and as a 
public official is John E. Robertson, revenue officer arid postmaster of 
Springfield, Tennessee. He is a son of Logan T. and Elizabeth (Wells) 
Robertson and a grandson of George W. Wells, a man of unusual distinc- 
tion in Crockett county. That community was the native home of Gteorge 
Wells,' and there he had always lived until the period of the Civil war. He 
was one of the rare southerners who disapproved of secession and be- 
lieved in the right of the national government to enforce unity in the 
great family of states whose very name is indicative of union. As Mr. 
Wells had the courage of his convictions and deceived no one in regard 
to his opinions, it became necessary for him to go, as an eidle from his 
southern home, to Illinois, where he temporarily settled in Duquoin. 
After the close of the war, he returned to Crockett county, the beloved 
home of his childhood, and there he remained throughout the residue of 
his life, with the friends of a lifetime. He had not gone so far as to 
demonstrate his loyalty to the government by taking up arms against his 
neighbors, but he had two sons who felt it their duty to serve the Union 
as soldiers in the Federal army. These two young men, John W. and 
Everett Wells, were both killed in the engagement at Fort Pillow. After 
the period of renewed peace was begun, Mr. Wells was again accorded his 
old place in the hearts of his friends of opposite opinions. He was, in- 
deed, a very prominent citizen, serving for twenty years as justice of the 
peace and receiving every tribute of genuine respect. The man whom 
his daughter married — ^Logan Robertson — was a carpenter for many 
years, only laying aside that occupation in 1880, to retire to his farm in 
Crockett county, where he now lives, at the age of eighty-one years. 
Elizabeth Wells Robertson died in 1884 at the age of forty-eight. She 
and her husband were both connected with the Missionary Baptist 
church. Logan Robertson is a Republican in politics and is a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Of the four sons yet liv- 
ing, who were born to Logan and Elizabeth Robertson, the second was 
John E., the date of whose birth was November 6, 1863, and whose birth- 
place was Chestnut Bluff, Tennessee. 



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TENNESSEE AND TExNNESSEANS 1413 

At his own home John E. Robertson was given the opportunities for 
education which the public schools offered and later spent one year in 
advanced study at the South-Western University, located at Jackson, 
Tennessee. He then engaged in the profession of teaching, which he con- 
tinued for two years. At the end of that time he entered the revenue 
service as assistant store-keeper and ganger. In 1892 he located in 
Springfield, which has ever since been his home. 

In 1894 Mr. Robertson was united in marriage with Miss Fannie 
Dylus, a daughter of Finis Dylus, a native and lifelong resident of Rob- 
ertson county. One child has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Robertson and 
was christened Lula D. Robertson. She is at home with her parents. 
Mrs. Robertson is a member of the Methodist church, her husband being 
connected with the Baptist denomination. He is afBliated with the secret 
societies of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Free and 
Accepted Masons. 

In 1906 Mrs. Robertson received the appointment to the postoflSce of 
Springfield and is nominal postmistress, having retained the oflSce since 
that time. Mr. Robertson undertakes many of the responsibilities and 
duties of the office, ably discharging the same. 

Robert Alexander Kimbel, of Linden, has been registrar of Perry 
county thirty-one years, or since 1882, and has the distinction of having 
given the longest continuous service in one position of any present office 
holder of Tennessee. This long continuation in public service speaks 
more eloquently than words can do as to the position Mr. Kimbel holds 
in the confidence and esteem of the people among whom he has lived 
since his birth. The name he bears is one that has been prominent in 
the public life of this county for full three-quarters of a century and 
has throughout that long period remained locally significant of the most 
worthy order of citizenship. 

The Kimbels are Scotch and the family was founded in this country 
by William Kimbel, the grandfather of Robert A., who emigrated here 
from Scotland along in the latter part of the eighteenth century and 
settled in Alabama, where he followed his trade as a brick mason. Dr. 
Franklin H. Kimbel, his son, born in Alabama in 1799, grew to man- 
hood in his native state and there was prepared for the profession of 
medicine. He came to Tennessee when a young man, locating first in 
Waynesboro, but removing later from thence to Perry county, where he 
spent the remainder of his career in active service as a physician, passing 
away in 1864. He became a very prominent citizen of this county and 
twice represented it in the Tennessee state legislature, first in 1851 and 
1852 and again in 1855-56. He was also clerk of the circuit court in 
Perry county during the '40s, and in 1860 was county court clerk. In 
political allegiance he was a staunch Democrat. In 1840, in Perry 
county, Tennessee, he wedded Eliza King, who was born in Cheatham 

Vol. V— 1 4 



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1414 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

county, Tennessee, in 1813 and who departed life in Perry county in 
1883. Six children came to this union, viz.: Robert Alexander Kim- 
bel, the immediate subject of this review; Benjamin F., who served 
under Captain Whitwell, in Colonel Cox's regiment, in General Forrest's 
army during the Civil war and died in a Federal prison; Elizabeth, 
deceased in infancy; James Wiley and John Nathaniel, twins, the for- 
mer of whom is deceased and the latter of whom resides in Perry county ; 
and Sims Allen, also a resident of Perry county. 

Robert Alexander Kimbel, the eldest of this family, was bom at 
Buffalo River, Perry county, Tennessee, September 26, 1841, and re- 
ceived his educational discipline in the early public schools of this 
county. His public service began in 1882, when he was elected to the 
office which he has held continuously since, that of registrar of Perry 
county, in which position his service has been of the most worthy and 
efficient order. He is a Democrat. 

Mr. Kimbel has been twice married. In 1890 he wedded Miss 
Martha Broyles, of Savannah, Tennessee, and to their union were born 
two children: Herbert Franklin, now deceased, and Hundley Broyles, 
who married Miss Bertha Wilier of Savannah and is manager of the 
Cumberland Telephone Company at Waynesboro, at the age of nineteen. 
Mrs. Kimbel passed to rest in 1896, a consistent member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church South. In 1902 Mr. Kimbel took as his second wife 
Miss Fannie Ellis, of Franklin, Tennessee. Both are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church South ; Mr. Kimbel has been trustee of his 
church for many years. 

KiNNARD Taylor McConnico. One of the strongest firms of the 
Nashville bar is that of Pitts & McConnico, composed of John A. Pitts 
and Kinnard T. McConnico. The junior member has been identified 
with the profession in this city for fifteen years, and has a record of 
achievement and success in both the law and in public affairs. 

Mr. McConnico, who represents an old Tennessee family, was bom 
at Comersville, Marshall county, this state, on February 13, 1875. His 
parents, both natives of Tennessee and of Scotch-Irish lineage, were 
George H. K. and Sarah Josephine (Taylor) McConnico. The McCon- 
nicos originally settled in Virginia, from there came to Williamson 
county, Tennessee, where a number of families of the name have since 
resided, and many of the members have been prominent. The Rev. 
Gamer McConnico, great-grandfather of the Nashville lawyer, was a 
pioneer minister of the Primitive Baptist church in Tennessee. George 
H. K. McConnico, the father, now deceased, was a Confederate soldier 
throughout the war, being a private of Company A of the Forty-fifth 
Tennessee Infantry. 

The family residence was established in Nashville when the son Kin- 
nard T. was seven years old, and here he was reared and educated. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1415 

From the public schools he entered Vanderbilt University, where he- 
took the literary course and later studied law, being graduated in 1896 
with the degree LL. B. Since that time he has practiced in this city 
with growing distinction and success. In 1902 he was elected city attor- 
ney for four years, but resigned after three years and in April, 1905, 
joined Mr. Pitts in their present partnership. Mr. McConnico is a 
Democrat and a member of the Knights of Pythias. He was married 
in 1906 to Miss Nina Ferris, daughter of the late Judge John C. Ferris, 
of Nashville. 

Henry J. Harley. As a representative of the manufacturing inter- 
ests of Davidson county, and an honored and respected citizen of Nash- 
ville, Henry J. Harley, vice-president of the Smith, Herring & Baird 
Manufacturing Company, and likewise of the Harley Pottery Company, 
is the subject of this brief history, wherein are recorded some of the 
more important and interesting events in his life. He was born on a 
farm in Jackson county, Tennessee, June 27, 1838, a son of George 
Washington Harley, coming from pioneer stock. 

His grandfather Hiram Harley, a native, as far as known, of North 
Carolina, came from there to Tennessee in the very early part of the 
nineteenth century, making the removal with teams. Locating in Jack- 
son county, he bought land on the Blackburn fork of Roaring river. 
Tennessee was then but sparsely settled, wild game of all kinds being 
abundant, while the streams were well filled with fish. There were no 
railways in the state, and no convenient markets in the county. Owing 
to an entire absence of mills of any kind, he, in common with the other 
pioneers, used to manufacture his own meal, pounding the com with a 
pestle in an iron mortar. In 1850, then a man well advanced in years, 
he again started westward, going to Missouri, settling as a pioneer in 
the vicinity of Springfield, buying a tract of land about twenty-five miles 
southeast of that city, and there residing until his death. He was killed 
during the Civil war by bushwhackers, being then ninety years of age. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Elizabeth Stafford, survived him 
several years, rounding out nearly a century of life. They reared a 
family of five children, as follows : Harriet, Elizabeth, Matilda, George 
W., and Andrew. 

Born in North Carolina, George W. Harley was but a babe when 
brought by his parents to Tennessee, where he grew to manhood. Sub- 
sequently buying land near the parental homestead, he cleared and 
improved a good farm, on which he was engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits until his deaths at the comparatively early age of fifty-nine years. 
He married Margaret Lawson, who was born in Jackson county, Ten- 
nessee ; her father, Kobert Tilf ord, it is said, was a native of Scotland, 
and her mother was a member of the well-known Sevier family. She 
died at the age of sixty-six years, having reared eight children, namely : 



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1416 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

. Henry J., Samantha, James A., Hiram E., Lewis, Elizabeth, Absalom, 
aud Eliza. 

Brought up in his native county, Henry J. Harley obtained his early 
education in the typical pioneer log cabin, attending a free school two 
or three months each year. The rude cabin was made of rough logs, 
with an earth chimney and a puncheon floor, and its pupils came there 
from anywhere within a radius of five miles. In 1853, when he was 
fifteen years old, his Grandfather Harley visited relatives and old-time 
friends in Tennessee, and when the grandfather returned to his home 
in ^Missouri he accompanied him, they being four weeks in making the 
trip, taking turns in riding the one horse which they had between them. 
He found wild game of all kinds plentiful in Missouri, and from the 
deer which he shot during the following winter he realized a little money. 

Going to Springfield in the spring of 1854, Mr. Harley found it to 
be a small but flourishing inland town, with stage connections for St. 
Louis and other points. The greater part of ]\Iissouri was then owned 
by the government, and people wishing to enter land were obliged to 
register at the land office in Springfield, and then patiently wait in the 
large crowd that was always in evidence until his name was called, some- 
times waiting two weeks or more. He sought and obtained work on a 
farm, and at the end of four months of steady labor was paid the sum 
of sixty dollars in gold. With his earnings in his pocket he started 
homeward, walking to St. Gtenevieve, on the Mississippi river, and qu 
the way passing Iron Mountain. There were then no railways in Mis- 
souri; on the plank road which had been laid to St. Genevieve, a dis- 
tance of forty miles, all the ore was drawn with teams. From that place 
Mr. Harley came via the Mississippi, Ohio, and Cumberland rivers to 
Nashville, Tennessee, where he purchased a fine suit of clothes. The 
vest, which was a fancy one, and decidedly dressy, was ornamented 
with hand-painted decorations. 

From that time until the outbreak of the Civil war, Mr. Harley was 
busily employed in tilling the soil. In July, 1861, he enlisted, from his 
old home in Jackson county, in Company G, Twenty-fifth Tennessee 
Volunteer Infantry, of which he was commissioned first lieutenant. 
After the engagement at Chickamauga, he was detailed as supernumary 
officer, and ordered to report to General Gideon J. Pillow, at Marietta, 
Georgia. He subsequently had to report first to Colonel Lockhart, at 
Montgomery, Alabama, and later to Major Tazewell Newman, at Gun- 
tersville, Alabama, continuing in active service until the cessation of 
hostilities. 

Returning home barefooted and ragged, ^Ir. Harley commenced 
farming on rented land, with his wife, occupying a log cabin. Success- 
ful in his operations, he continued as a tiller of the soil until 1871, when 
he accep.ted a position with the Phillips & Buttorflf Manufacturing Com- 
pany, of Nashville, for which he was traveling salesman for three years. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1417 

In 1874 he was elected clerk of the county court of Jackson county, and 
at the expiration of his term, in 1878, was re-elected to the same ofSce. 
Resigning in 1880, Mr. Harley resumed his former position as commer- 
cial salesman for his former employers, and continued with the firm 
until 1890. From that time until 1908, a period of eighteen years, he 
was general manager of the Broad Street Stove and Tinware Company's 
establishment. During the past four years, since 1908, Mr. Harley has 
been associate with the Smith, Herring & Baird Company, of which 
he is vice-president, being also vice-president of the Harley Pottery 
Company. He is likewise much interested in the Cumberland Steam- 
boat Company, and in other enterprises of importance. 

Mr. Harley married, January 17, 1860, Mary E. McKoy, who was 
born in Coffee county, Tennessee, a daughter of Hiram and Margaret 
(McDonald) McKoy. Five children have been born of the union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Harley, namely: Maggie, James M., Hiram, William H., and 
David R. Maggie, wife of W. Y. Hart, has three children, Chester K., 
Mary, and Eugenia. James M. Harley married Willie Ann Vaughan, 
and they are the parents of two children, Elmore and Mattie Lee. 
Hiram, whose death occurred August 13, 1892, married Jessie Phillips, 
by whom he had one child, Mary Kate. William H. married Florence 
Roach, and they have three children, Ruth, Rachel, and Rebecca. David 
R. married Jennie Vaughan. Elmore Harley, Mr. Harley 's grandson, 
married Alta Jarrett, and they have three children, Johnson, Jarrett, 
William Leslie and Anna Elizabeth. Mary Kate Harley, a grand- 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harley, married Hugh Martin, and has one 
child, Mary Elizabeth Martin. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harley are members of the Christian church, and for 
full forty years Mr. Harley has belonged to the Ancient Free and 
Accepted Order of Masons. 

William Thomas Hardison. For many years prominently identified 
with the business life of the city of Nashville, William Thomas Hardison 
has contributed largely towards the development and advancement of 
the city's mercantile prosperity, and is now living retired from active 
pursuits, enjoying a well-earned leisure. A son of Humphrey Hardison, 
he was born, March 20, 1839, in Maury county, Tennessee, of substan- 
tial pioneer stock. 

His paternal grandfather, James Hardison, who was of Scotch ances- 
try, was born and reared in North Carolina, and was there married. 
In 1808, accompanied by his family, he migrated to Tennessee, making 
the journey overland with teams, one wagon and a cart holding all of 
their household possessions and their farming implements. He located 
as a pioneer in Maury county, settling there while the country round- 
about was still in its primitive condition, the dense forests being in- 
habited by the wily Indian and the wild beasts native to the country^ 



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1418 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

neither, however, proving very troublesome. For many years after he 
established his home in Tennessee there were no railroads near him, 
Nashville, forty-five miles away, being the nearest depot for supplies. 
He purchased land, and on the homestead which he improved spent the 
remainder of his life, both he and his faithful wife living to a good 
old age. 

Bom in North Carolina, Humphrey Hardison was a small boy of four 
years when he was brought by his parents to Tennessee.' Growing to 
manhood in pioneer days, he received a limited education in the district 
schools, but while assisting his father became familiar with the various 
branches of agriculture. Beginning life for himself, he purchased sixty 
acres of land on Duck river, twelve miles east of Columbia, and at once 
began to clear the tract of its hfeavy growth of timber. Having but one 
hired man to assist him in his arduous task, the work was necessarily 
slow. He embarked in the livestock business, making a specialty of rais- 
ing mules and saddle horses. He was very successful in that industry, 
and as his means increased he added to his landed possessions until he 
had seven hundred acres in one body besides outlying tracts in that 
vicinity, and six hundred and forty acres of land in Texas. He operated 
with slave labor, and was easily the leading stock raiser and dealer of 
Maury county for several years, and a man of prominence in agricul- 
tural circles until his death, October 11, 1874. 

Humphrey Hardison married Harriet Woolard, who was bom in 
Tennessee, a daughter, and only child, of Silas and Lucretia (Robinson) 
Woolard, natives of North Carolina, and early settlers of Maury county. 
She died at a comparatively early age, being but forty-five years old 
when she passed to the life beyond. Ten children were bom of their 
union, as follows: Marshall, who served in the Confederate army, and 
was captured at Fort Donelson, died while in prison; James, who like- 
wise enlisted in the Confederate service, died soon after entering the 
army; Jane became the wife of George W. Patterson; Sarah married 
J. C. Ligett; Margaret Sophronia married J. M. Patterson; William 
Thomas, with whom this brief sketch is chiefly concerned; Richard 
Calvin, who, early in 1861, enlisted in the Confederate army, and was 
commissioned lieutenant of his company, was honorably discharged in 
1862, on account of physical disability ; Victoria became the wife of Wil- 
liam Wilcox ; Humphrey enlisted as a soldier in 1864^, and served until 
the close of the war; and Sherod T. 

On attaining his majority William Thomas Hardison took up his 
residence in Texas, which was then a typical frontier state, with but forty 
miles of railroad within its borders. He found employment as clerk 
in a store at Paris, but when, a few months later, war between the states 
was declared, he returned home, and at once enlisted in Company F, 
First Tennessee Cavalry, under command of General Armstrong and 
later of General Forrest, the famous Confederate cavalry leader. Mr. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1419 

Hardison continued with his command in all of its many campaigns, 
marches and battles until the close of the conflict, being in Greensboro, 
North Carolina, at the surrender. He was allowed to retain his horse 
until he reached Stl'awberry Plains, Tennessee, where, with others, he 
took passage for Nashville in a box car. 

On arriving home, Mr. Hardison assisted his father in the harvest 
field for awhile, and later taught school two terms. Changing his occu- 
pation, he then dealt in horses for a time, buying in Indianapolis, 
Indiana, and selling in his home state. He subsequently managed his 
father's farm for a year, and then embarked in agricultural pursuits 
on his own account, assuming possession of a small farm which his father 
had given him, it being located in Marshall county. Disposing of that 
at the end of a year, Mr. Hardison moved to Obion county, Tennessee, 
where he bought a tract of timbered land, and, at a crossing of the roads, 
established a general store, which he conducted successfully for two 
years. Coming then to Nashville, a city of but thirty-five thousand 
inhabitants, Mr. Hardison bought a third interest in a retail grocery 
store on Broad street. Selling out his interest four years later, he, with 
two others, purchased a wholesale grocery house and stock, and con- 
ducted a substantial mercantile business, as a member of the firm of 
Harsh, McLean & Hardison, until 1890. Selling out in that year, Mr. 
Hardison purchased a half interest in the business of Mr. E. A. Ireland, 
with whom he was associated for five years. He then bought out his 
partner, and remained as sole proprietor of the establishment until suc- 
ceeded by his son, Humphrey Hardison, who still continues the business 
with characteristic success. 

A man of great executive and financial ability, Mr. Hardison has been 
prominently identified with various enterprises of note. For five years 
he was president of the Broadway National Bank, and on resigning that 
position served for two years as director, being then succeeded by his 
son Humphrey. He has also served as director and vice-president of the 
Wilkinson County Undertakers' Association. 

Mr. Hardison married, October 29, 1867, Martha G. McLean, who was 
born in Marshall county, Tennessee, a daughter of Andrew and Eliza- 
beth (Denney) McLean. Mr. and Mrs. Hardison have two children 
living, namely: Elizabeth McLean, widow of M. A. Montgomery; and 
Humphrey, who succeeded his father in business. Blanche, their eldest 
child, lived but one year, and William T., their youngest son, died at the 
age of twenty-one years. Humphrey Hardison married Elizabeth E. 
Escott, and they have two children, William Thomas Hardison, the 
second; and Frances Scott Hardison. Mr. and Mrs. William Thomas 
Hardison united with the Presbyterian church when young, and have 
reared their children in that faith. 



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1420 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

E. B. Chappell, D. D. As Sunday school editor for the Methodist 
Episcopal church South, Dr. Chappell has the distinction of writing for 
more people than any other editor or writer in the entire South. He is 
one of the senior men in southern Methodism, has been connected with 
the ministry and oflScial work of the church for more than thirty years 
and now occupies one of the most responsible places in the church service. 

Dr. E. B. Chappell was born in Perry county, Tennessee, December 
27, 1853, a son of W. B. and Elizabeth ( Whitaker) Chappell. The Chap- 
pell family came from England and settled in Virginia in the year 1635, 
and has been represented in southern civic and professional life for many 
generations. The paternal grandparents were William and Sallie 
(Palmer) Chappell, both of whom were born in Virginia, moved out to 
Tennessee in 1827, locating on a farm in Maury county near Columbia. 
The grandfather was a man of ability, both in business and public affairs, 
owned a number of slaves and conducted a large plantation. Nearly all 
his active life he was a class leader in the Methodist church. 

Mrs. W, B. Chappell, the mother, was bom in North Carolina, in 1831, 
and is now deceased. Her husband was born in Tennessee in 1828 and 
died in 1900. He was educated in this state and spent all his life here. 
By occupation he was a farmer, and was a man of more than usual edu- 
cation for his day. He filled the office of county surveyor and was very 
influential in his community. For many years he was officially con- 
nected with the Methodist church and took much part in Sunday school 
work. In politics he was a Whig and later a Democrat. He was twice 
married, and by the first marriage there were four children. After the 
death of his first wife he married a Miss Gillham, and there were five 
children by that union. E. B. Chappell was the oldest child. The 
others are as follows: W. W. Chappell, who resides on a farm near 
Nashville ; Sallie, wife of E. S. Gillham, a resident in west Tennessee ; 
Anna, wife of H. A. Grimes, of Oklahoma. The children of the second 
marriage were : Charles P., a merchant of Tupelo, Mississippi ; Summers, 
a farmer in Wayne county, Tennessee ; Mrs. Grady Jones, of Waverly, 
Tennessee ; Rev. A. C. Chappell, in the ministry of the Methodist church 
South at Waco, Texas ; Rev. C. G. Chappell, also a minister of that denom- 
ination and stationed at Gatesville, Texas. Both the latter are prominent 
in the ministry and have excellent charges. The maternal grandparents 
of E. B. Chappell were James Whitaker and wife, the latter being a 
Lyon. They were born in North Carolina, came to Tennessee in 1846, 
settling in Wayne county, where the grandfather was a farmer and pros- 
perous planter. 

E. B. Chappell received his education at the Webb School, at that time 
at CuUeoka, Tenn., and was graduated from Vanderbilt University in 
1879. ^ The first two years after his graduation he spent as principal of 
a conference school and in 1882 took up the active work of the ministry 
in the Texas conference. He preached in Texas for nine years, being 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1421 

Btationed at LaGrange, San Antonio and Austin, having the best appoint- 
ments in the state. Then removing to St. Louis he served two of the 
leading churches of that city, and in 1898 came to Nashville, where he 
was pastor of the West End church for four years and of McKendree 
church for four years. In May, 1906, he was elected to his present office 
as Sunday school editor of the Methodist church South. He is also 
chairman of the Sunday school board of the church. 

Mr. Chappell married Miss Jennie Headlee, daughter of Rev. J. H. 
Headless, of the St. Louis conference. The marriage was celebrated in 
1880 and four children have been born, namely : P. W. Chappell, a civil 
engineer, who makes his home at Dallas, Texas; Ethel, who married W. 
A. Smart, and lives at Portsmouth, Virginia, her husband being a pastor 
of the Methodist church there, and his father one of the distinguished 
ministers of the denomination ; Helen, at home ; and E. B. Chappell, Jr., 
in business at Houston, Texas. Mr. Chappell is prominent in the Masonic 
Order, having attained thirty-two degrees of the Scottish Rite. 

Joseph D. Hamilton. Treasurer of the Board of Missions for the 
Methodist Episcopal church South, Mr. Hamilton has held this respon- 
sible position for the past fifteen years, and is one of the ablest men con- 
nected with the business organization of the church. He is a native of 
Nashville, and for many years was in business in this city, previous to 
his election as treasurer of the Board of Missions. 

Joseph D. Hamilton was born at Nashville, December 15, 1845, and 
the family had been identified with the country west of the Alleghenies 
for more than a century. His parents were ]\Iortimer and Emeline (Hill) 
Hamilton. His paternal grandparents were Joseph D. and Sallie (Mor- 
gan) Hamilton, the former a native of Rockbridge county, Virginia, 
whence he moved into Kentucky as an early settler, and for many years 
was cashier of the bank of Russellville. Joseph D. Hamilton was a 
man who enjoyed unusual success, although his life came to a premature 
end. The maternal grandparents were Thomas and Sallie (Woods) Hill. 
The former was a native of Kentucky, and was a first cousin of General 
A. P. Hill, of Confederate fame. He followed business as a merchant 
and was owner of a line of steamboats and previous to the war owned 
many slaves. 

Mortimer Hamilton, the father, was born in Russellville, Kentucky, 
in 1816, and died in 1879. His wife was born at Nashville in 1816, and 
her death occurred in 1907. The father was educated in Kentucky, but 
when a young man moved to Nashville where he was in the drug business 
during the remainder of his life. He and his wife had eight children, 
only three of whom are now living, the two daughters being Mary and 
Emeline, both unmarried. The father was very prominent in the affairs 
of the Methodist church South, serving as an official in his church until 
death. He was a Democrat in politics, and a Mason who took all the 



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1422 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

degrees of the York Bite, including the Knights Templar, and held the 
various chairs in his lodge. 

Joseph D. Hamilton received his education in the public schools, and 
just before the close of the war enlisted and saw brief service with the 
Twentieth Tennessee Regiment of Infantry. Returning from this ex- 
perience he engaged in the hardware business with his uncle, J. M. 
Hamilton, at Nashville, the firm being known as J. M. Hamilton & Com- 
pany. Some time later he became identified with the manufacturing 
of paper and bags, under the name of Morgan & Hamilton Company. 
This was his active business line until 1898, when he was elected treasurer 
of the Board of Missions of the Methodist Episcopal church South. Mr. 
Hamilton has the important responsibility of handling a million and a 
half dollars every year, and has charge of the funds collected in all the 
churches of the Southern Methodist denomination for missions. He gives 
his whole time to this business and has no other commercial interests. 

In 1891 he married Miss Mary G. McTyeire, oldest daughter of Bishop 
H. N. McTyeire, whose name was for years a household word in Method- 
ism and who was the founder of Vanderbilt University at Nashville. 

Mr. Hamilton is a Democrat in politics, and is a steward in the Mc- 
Kendree church at Nashville, being also a member of the oflScial board. 

David R. Pickens, M. D. Representing one of the oldest families of 
Marshall county, Dr. Pickens has been extending the recognition of the 
name in the field of medicine and surgery, and is accounted one of the 
ablest young surgeons of Nashville, where he has had prominent connec- 
tions and a large practice. 

David R. Pickens was bom in Mooresville, in Marshall county, Ten- 
nessee, August 9, 1882, a son of Z. R. and Nannie L. (McKibbon) Pick- 
ens. The founder of the Pickens family in Tennessee was Hamilton 
Pickens, great-grandfather of the doctor, who came from South Caro- 
lina to this state and was one of the early settlers in Marshall county. 
His brother served as one of the early governors of South Carolina, where 
the name is particularly well known. Grandfather David B. Pickens 
was bom in Marshall county, Tennessee, in 1812, more than a century 
ago, and lived to be eighty-five years of age. He was a successful farmer 
and trader. Z. R. Pickens, the father, was born in Marshall county, in 
1860, had a high school education at Mooresville, became a farmer and 
stock dealer, and for the past fourteen years has resided at Belle Buckle, 
where he has built up a large business in buying and selling mules, being 
probably the best known dealer in these animals in the state. He is a 
member of the Presbyterian church in which he has taken considerable 
interest, and in politics is a Democrat. His wife was born in Maury 
county, in 1863, a daughter of J. Van McKibbon, who was a native of 
Maury county, and a substantial farmer there. Z. R. Pickens and wife 
had five children, namely : David R. ; Xennie, wife of William Bonner, a 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1423 

merchant at Belle Buckle; William F., a farmer at Mooresville ; Mackie, 
wife of Lesley Davis, of Belle Buckle, and Z. R., Jr., who is in the same 
business as his father, and the two are associated. 

Dr. Pickens when a boy attended Webb school, and later took two 
years in the literary department of the Vanderbilt University. From 
that he began the study of medicine, and was graduated M. D. in 190.7. 
His first experience was in the city hospital at Nashville, and he also 
spent two years with Dr. R. E. Fort, in the latter 's private hospital. In 
1910 he established himself in independent practice, and has since 
enjoyed unusual success. He has made a specialty of surgery, and is at 
the present time instructor in surgery in the Vanderbilt University. 
Dr. Pickens is a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity, and 
the Alpha Kappa Kappa medical f raterity. He belongs to the Elks Lodge 
No. 72, and is a member of all the medical societies and associations. In 
politics he is a Democrat. He gives all his time to his profession, in 
which he has already won a high place. 

Hon. Charles C. Gu^bebt. One of the most progressive members of 
the present legislature is Charles C. Gilbert of Nashville, in which city 
he has been well known for his success in the automobile business, and 
as the enterprising assistant secretary of the board of trade. Mr. Gilbert 
is young, came up through the ranks, has a keen conception of modern 
tendencies, and requirements of business and civic life, and his influence 
and creative activity in the legislature have been directed to measures 
of the most practical character and afifecting broad and vital interests in 
the state. 

In Bethel, Giles county, Tennessee, Charles C. Gilbert was born 
March 12, 1877, a son of John C. and Tranquilla (Gracy) Gilbert. His 
grandfather, Calvin G. Gilbert, came from North Carolina, settling in 
Giles county, and was the founder of the Gilbert family in this state. 
The maternal grandfather was J. A. Gracy, for many years a Presby- 
terian minister, and one of the organizers of the Cumberland Presbyterian 
church, his home during most of his life being in Lincoln county, where 
his daughter, the mother of Mr. Gilbert, was bom. The mother now 
lives in Texas. The father, who was born in Giles county, was educated 
there, was a farmer, and provided well for his family. When the war 
broke out, he organized a company, and as captain in the Twenty- 
Third Tennessee Regiment went through the struggle from beginning to 
end. He was wounded in three different battles, was captured and spent 
several months in Federal prisons. After the war he returned to Giles 
county. He was an active member of the Cumberland Presbyterian 
church, and prominent in Masonry, having taken thirty-two degrees of 
the Scottish Rite in that order. In politics he was a Democrat. He and 
his wife were the parents of thirteen children, six of whom are now 
living, and the Nashville legislator was ninth in order of birth. 



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1424 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

In the schools at Lawrenceburg, Tennessee, Charles C. Gilbert 
received his first training, and continued in the public schools of Nash- 
ville. To earn his way during the early stages of his career, Mr. Gilbert 
learned and practiced stenography, an avenue through which so many 
young men have reached a useful place in commercial affairs. He kept 
up that work for twelve years, and eventually engaged in the automo- 
bile business, organizing the Southern Automobile Company, a concern 
which his vitalizing energy made very successful. He also has the dis- 
tinction of having organized the Nashville Automobile Club, and was its 
first secretary. On returning from that place he became assistant secre- 
tary of the Nashville Board of Trade, with which important organization 
he has since been connected. 

Mr. Gilbert is one of the most vigorous exponents in Tennessee of 
the good roads movement. He has attended conventions all over the 
United States, and on many different occasions, has spoken and argued 
the material benefits to be derived from well made and serviceable 
highways. In politics he is Democratic, and served two years in the 
city council. Later he was nominated to the assembly, but refused the 
nomination. In 1912 he accepted this honor when again proffered him, 
and was elected. During his legislative career he has introduced the 
banking law for state banks; has brought in the measure providing for 
a highway department in the state ; has been one of the chief movers in 
a general law, providing for commission government in the cities of the 
state ; another bill of which he is the author allows counties to issue their 
own bonds without previous legislative permission. ^Ir. Gilbert fought 
hard against capital punishment, but lost the bill abolishing that 
institution. 

In June, 1900, Mr. Gilbert married Miss Alma Badford, of McMinn- 
ville. To their marriage have been born three children : Mary L. who is 
in school ; Charles C, Jr., and Elizabeth, the latter being one year of age. 
The family worship in the Presbyterian church of which Mr. Gilbert is 
an elder, and for thirteen years has been superintendent of the Sun- 
day school. He is a member of the Masonic Order and of the Knights 
of Pythias. He has done much work as a speaker for the Boys Corn Club 
and for the promotion of agricultural improvement. 

Rev. Warner T. Bolung, D. D. Dr. Boiling was one of the dis- 
tinguished members of the clergy of the ^lethodist Episcopal church, 
South, and in his high calling has labored with all of consecrated zeal 
and devotion. It is needless to say that he was a man of fine intellectual 
attainments, and further than this, he was a most effective pulpit orator 
and possessed of an executive ability that has enabled him to further 
the temporal, as well as the spiritual prosperity of the various churches 
which he served. He was at time of his death, April 16, 1913, pastor 
of the church of his denomination at Clinton, the judicial center of 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1425 

Hickman county, Kentucky, this attractive little city being situated 
about fourteen miles distant from the boundary line between that state 
and Tennessee. There is all of consistency in according to him specific 
consideration in this publication, for though he was not a resident of Ten- 
nessee, he was a member of one of its gallant regiments in the Confed- 
erate service in the Civil war, and had otherwise been concerned in 
various ways with Tennessee affairs. 

Dr. Boiling was a scion of staunch and patrician old southern stock 
and a representative of families that were founded in Virginia, that 
cradle of much of our national history, in the colonial epoch. He was 
born in Greene county, Alabama, on the 25th of May, 1847, and was a 
son of Warner T., and Harriet E. (Smith) Boiling, both of whom were 
born and reared in Virginia. Warner T. Boiling removed from the Old 
Dominion state to Alabama when a young man and in the latter state 
he became a successful planter, his operations having been carried for- 
ward on a somewhat extensive scale. He suffered great losses through 
the ravages of the Civil war, as did most of the planters of the southern 
states, and both he and his wife continued to reside in Alabama until 
their death. They were devout and zealous members of the Episcopal 
church; they lived ** godly, righteous and sober lives;'* and they ever 
commanded the high esteem of all who knew them. Of their children, 
three sons and one daughter attained to years of maturity none of whom 
are now living. Dr. Boiling, of this review, was the youngest in the 
family and the only one of the number to enter the ministry. One 
brother, Robert P. Boiling, was engaged in mercantile business, and an- 
other brother, George S., served in the quarter-master's department of 
the Confederate army of the Civil war. 

On the old homestead plantation Dr. Boiling passed the days of his 
childhood, under the conditions and influences of the fine old southern 
regime, — a patriarchial system that gave to American history its only 
touch of generic romance. He was a lad of about fifteen years at the 
inception of the war between the states, and his youthful loyalty to the 
south was shown forthwith <ind in an insistent way. He tendered his 
service in defense of the cause of the Confederacy, by enlisting in May, 
1861, and was attached first to the Harris Zouave Cadets, in Memphis, 
Tennessee, as Company D of the 154th Sr. Tennessee Regiment. Then he 
re-enlisted as a private in Company C, Second Tennessee Infantry, and 
with this gallant command he served from May, 1861, to May, 1865, 
the entire period of the great conflict between the north and the south. 
It was his to participate in many important engagements, besides innum- 
erable skirmishes and other minor conflicts, and he proved a valiant and 
faithful young soldier in battling for a cause which he believed to be 
right and just and the story of which is written in words pregnant with 
the evidences of devotion, suffering and sacrifice. The Doctor took part 
in the battles of Shiloh, Perrysville, Murfreesboro, and Chickamauga, 



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1426 TENNESSEE -AND TENNESSEANS 

Ringgold Gap — ^the entire Atlanta campaign, from Dalton to Jonesboro — 
Franklin and also Lost ^Mountain and Nashville, and in the last men- 
tioned engagement he received a severe wound in the right arm. At 
the battle of Nashville, he was captured by the enemy, in December, 
1864, and he was held a prisoner at Camp Chase, Ohio, until the close 
of the war, his parole having been granted in May, 1865. Dr. Boiling 
ever retained the deepest interest in his old comrades in arms and signified 
the same by his affiliation with the United Confederate Veterans' Asso- 
ciation. 

In the schools of his native state Dr. Boiling gained his preliminary 
education, which was supplemented by a classical course in historic old 
Emory and Henry College, at Emory, Virginia, an institution main- 
tained under the auspices of the Methodist Episcopal church. South. 
His theological education was acquired in the conference course of 
studies, and in 1868 he was ordained in the ministry, at Paris, Tennes- 
see. In 1886 he received the degree of Doctor of Divinity from St. 
Charles College, Missouri, in recognition of his high attainments and 
exalted service in the church, and in 1909, the same degree was con- 
ferred upon him by Peabody Institute, at Nashville, Tennessee. 

Dr. Boiling labored in his high vocation for more than two score 
years, within which he garnered a generous harvest in the aiding and 
uplifting of his fellow men and in making his angle of influence con- 
stantly expand in beneficence and zeal, as an earnest worker in the 
vineyard of the divine Master. He joined the Memphis conference in 
1868 and for nearly twenty years was one of the distinguished and 
influential representatives thereof, the while he had the affectionate 
regard and high esteem of the various communities in which he held 
pastoral charges, including those at Lexington and Covington, Ken- 
tucky; Hannibal, Missouri; Centenary Church, Payette, Missouri; St. 
Paul's, Denver, Colorado; Columbus, Mississippi; Shreveport, Louisiana; 
Jackson, Mississippi ; the Central Methodist church in Memphis, Tennes- 
see; the Broadway church in Paducah, Kentucky; and the church at 
Fulton, that state. He was transferred to the West Virginia conference 
in 1880 and remained in other conferences to do special work directed by 
different Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, returning 
to the Memphis conference in 1904, where he remained until his death. 
The Kentucky towns he lived in, are included in the bounds of the 
Memphis conference. He held the pastorate of the church of his denomi- 
nation in Clinton, Kentucky, from November, 1912, to April 16, 1913, 
on which date he died. He was buried in Forest Hill cemetery, Memphis, 
Tennessee, his former home, on April 17, 1913. 

Dr. Boiling was first married to Miss Mary Coley, of Milan, Tennes- 
see, in 1870. Eobert E., Margaret E., and Cora were children of this 
marriage, Cora dying in infancy, in 1873. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1427 

At Huntington, West Virginia, on the 5th of September, 1883, was 
solemnized the marriage of Dr. Boiling to Miss Willie R. Jeter, who was 
born and reared in Virginia and who is a daughter of the late William 
Ryland Jeter, an honored and representative citizen of that state. Mrs. 
Boiling is a woman of most gracious personality and in her gentle 
influence she has effectively supplemented the endeavors of her husband 
in his pastoral work. Of the nine children of Dr. and Mrs. Boiling, two 
are deceased: Warner Tapscott, who passed away at the age of five 
years, and Arthur Davis, who was three years of age at the time of his 
death. The surviving children are: Margaret E., Robert E., Louise, 
Mary, Helen Meade, Gladys and Randolph P. Robert E. is a bachelor 
living in Detroit, Michigan; Margaret E., married E. H. Mullen of 
Columbus, Mississippi, and is now living in Los Angeles, California; 
Louise L., married John W. Fitzhugh of Jackson, Mississippi, and now 
lives in Memphis, Tennessee ; Mary Randolph married Dudley Porter of 
Paris, Tennessee, where they live; Gladys Garland married George L. 
Alley of Fulton, Kentucky, where they now reside ; Helen Meade resides 
at home ; Randolph Peyton, thirteen years, also resides at home. 

The late Rev. Dr. Boiling during nearly the last eight years of his 
life was a regular correspondent for the Suriday Commercial Appeal, 
writing for a number of years under ** Reflections." 

Dr. Robert H. Baylor. A veritable dean of physicians is Dr. Robert 
H. Baylor, of Erin, Tennessee. The incidents of his life have covered 
numerous states, and some of its experiences have been scarcely, less 
than romantic. His native state was Virginia, where his father, John 
Baylor, born just on the threshold of the nineteenth century, had come 
as a pioneer from North Carolina. In the Old Dominion state John 
Baylor had followed the combined vocations of wagon-maker and farmer, 
and had become quite successful. He was a member of the historic Whig 
party and of the Methodist church. To the same religious fold be- 
longed his wife, Elizabeth Young Baylor, also a native of Virginia. They 
were the parents of eleven children, the fifth of whom was christened 
Robert H. He was born on September 24, 1836, and was destined to carve 
for himself the varying fortunes that have made his life a successful one. 

In one of the little log school houses that were once numerous in 
Virginia, Robert H. Baylor received his elementary education. He was 
a studious youth, whose love of learning caused him to carry **his book" 
with him when he followed the plow in the fields of his father's farm. 
Thus growing into habits of agricultural life, he continued in such occu- 
pation until he was a young man of twenty-four years of age. At that 
time he left his home, going to Mobile, Alabama, where he entered the 
Confederate navy. He continued in the service about two years, on the 
steamer Selraa. being that ship's hospital steward. He was made a 



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1428 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

prisoner of war on August 5, 1864, at Mobile, during the battle of Mobile 
Bay. He was transferred to New Orleans and later to Ship Island, re- 
maining there until the close of the war, after which he went to Vicks- 
burg, Mississippi, and thence to Galveston, where he engaged in selling 
drugs. While thus engaged in the southern city he took advantage of 
lectures given at the medical college there, although he did not matricu- 
late in said institution. Later plans led him to go to Louisville, where he 
pursued a regular course of study in the Louisville Medical Colfege. He 
had left a reserve supply of money in the hands of a Galveston acquaint- 
ance who was to hold the sum in trust, but who failed in business and 
lost the funds entrusted to his care. There was nothing for the newly 
fledged physician to do but to attempt to return to Galveston without 
resources. He therefore undertook to make the journey on foot. 

When he reached Danville, Tennessee, he made a sojourn at that 
place, where he taught school for a few terms. Incidentally he met a 
student physician from Nashville, with whom he arranged to buy the 
latter 's outfit of medical supplies. Thus equipped,' Dr. Baylor began 
his practice as a young doctor of medicine. Danville was the field of his 
initial practice. 

Dr. Baylor married Miss ]\Iartha Edmonia Edwards, of near Elkton, 
Todd county, Kentucky. Their home had been blessed with four children 
and the medical career of the doctor was well under way after six years 
of residence in Danville. He then in 1884, removed to Stewart, Tennes- 
see, where for eighteen years he was in active general practice, lai^ely 
among the rural residents. At the end of that period he purchased a 
property near Tennessee Ridge, on which he lived for one year. In 1900 
he removed to Erin, Tennessee, where he is still actively at work in pro- 
fessional duties. He is the owner of a small farm, in which he is recrea- 
tively as well as financially interested. He holds the responsible position 
of health officer of Houston county. The doctor's sympathies are Demo- 
cratic, but his more mature theories are conservatively and sanely so- 
cialistic. 

Dr. Baylor's life is enriched by its present useful activity; by its 
wealth of significant memories; and by the nuitual interest of his four 
sons, all of whom are living worthy lives. Robert A. Baylor is at Winni- 
peg, Canada ; Willard Hudson Baylor is a painter in Erin, Tennessee ; 
Everett Ralston Baylor is a bookkeeper in a wholesale grocery at Nash- 
ville ; and Lloyd Ellingwood is at home with his parents. 

Scott Peeston PrrzHUGH. The list of Dover's promising barris- 
ters would be far from complete without the name of Scott Preston Fitz- 
hugh, one of the youngest but also one of the most talented members of 
the bar in this community of Tennessee. The Volunteer State has 
known well and estimably four generations of the Fitzhugh family. 
The founder in this commonwealth of the Tennessee line of this origin- 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1429 

idly Scotch family was James Fitzhugh (the great-grandfather of S. P. 
Fitzhugh), who was a native of Virginia. With his wife he settled 
in Stewart county, on a rural property near Dover.. Here he followed 
farming and reared his children. His son, James Y. Fitzhugh (the 
grandfather of our subject) became a planter to some extent and com- 
bined with his agricultural industry considerable ministerial service in 
the Free-Will Baptist church. He married and of the eleven children 
who were born to him the eighth was Pinckney Preston Fitzhugh (the 
father of Attorney Fitzhugh). Successful, like his father, in the acqui- 
sition of much real estate, P. P. Fitzhugh became a planter and a dealer 
in both lumber and real estate. His business is very extensive and he 
is also from time to time the incumbent of important political office; 
in the last two sessions of the state legislature in Tennessee he was 
honored by representing Stewart county in that body of lawmakers. 
He is active in the religious interests of the Southern Methodist church, 
as is also Mrs. P. P. Fitzhugh. He is also prominent in the Dover lodge 
of the Knights of Pythias and in the Dover lodge of the Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons. Both he and his wife (who was formerly Miss 
Missouri Wbitford, and a daughter of Willis Whitford of Stewart 
county), are natives of this county, the husband's date of birth having 
been September 22, 1853, and the wife's February 14, 1856. It was in 
the same community that they were married in 1874. Their eight 
children are now located as follows : Eflfie, Mrs. R. L. Lancaster, in Stew- 
art county; Ellie, Mrs. W. A. Taylor, in Houston county; Ettie, Mrs. 
Qeorge Sikes, in Stewart county ; Martha, Mrs. Joel Carney, in Stewart 
county; Maggie, Mrs. Nelson Sikes, in Stewart county; Scott P., the 
subject of this genealogical and biographical review, in Dover, Tennes- 
see; Genie Fitzhugh, in this county; and Comer Fitzhugh, in the state 
of Colorado. 

The seventh in order of birth and the eldest^son of his parents was 
Scott Preston Fitzhugh, who was bom on the paternal property near 
Dover, in Stewart county, on December 15, 1888. His education was 
pursued in successive public and private schools at Dover, Big Rock, 
Cumberland City and Dickson. This general equipment of an intellec- 
tual sort he made the background for the definitely purposive research 
in various branches of legal lore, which he studied at Cumberland Uni- 
versity, located at Lebanon, Tennessee. Mr. Fitzhugh 's law course was 
completed in 1910 and he was in that same year admitted to the bar of 
Tennessee. 

Such was Mr. Fitzhugh 's standing in his native community that he 
found Stewart an advantageous location in which to begin his practice. 
In 1910 he formed a partnership with Porter Dunlap, with whom he 
still continues sharing offices and possessional interests. Aside from 
his legal business, Mr. Fitzhugh is a stockholder in the People's Bank 
and Trust Company of Dover. His political allegiance is of course 

Vol. V— 15 



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1430 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

given to the party which his father and grandfather have so loyally 
represented — that of the Democrats. 

Social and fraternal connections appeal to the genial nature of Scott 
Preston Fitzhugh, who is a member of the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica, at Dover Camp; of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, at 
Dover lodge; of the Order of the Eastern Star, at Dover; and to the 
Kappa Sigma collegiate fraternity, in the Theta chapter at Lebanon 
University. 

In the same year in which his professional career began, Mr. Fitz- 
hugh won as his bride Miss Gertie Riggin, of Lesbin, Stewart county. 
Mrs. Fitzhugh is a daughter of A. W. Riggin, of that place. Both she 
and her husband are exemplary members of the Methodist church 
South, in Dover. Their home is an attractive one and both are social 
favorites in the community. 

Herbert Ewing liARKiNS-, M. D. One of the old and honored fami- 
lies of Dickson county, Tennessee, members of which have been promi- 
nent in military and civic life, in business, agriculture and the pro- 
fessions, is that bearing the name of Larkins, which was founded here 
prior to the year 1800. A worthy representative is found in Herbert 
Ewing Larkins, M. D., of Charlotte, whose rapid advance in the fields 
of medicine and surgery is gaining him a recognized place among the 
leaders of his profession in this part of the state. Dr. Larkins is a 
native of Charlotte, bom July 25, 1878, a son of Joseph Henry and 
Elizabeth (Corlen) Larkins. 

Hugh Larkins, the founder of the family in this country, emigrated 
from Ireland during Colonial times, enlisted in General Washington's 
army, and fought valiantly during the War of the Revolution, and some 
time after the close of that struggle made his way to Tennessee, here 
founding the family ift Dickson county. Among his children was 
Joseph Larkins, who became the father of Clark Larkins, the latter 
being the grandfather of Dr. Larkins. Joseph Henry Larkins was born 
in 1843, in Dickson county, and grew to manhood on the large planta- 
tion of his father, who was an extensive slave-holder. At the outbreak of 
the Civil war, although but a lad, he enlisted in the Forty-ninth Regi- 
ment, Tennessee Infantry, in a company organized by Captain Green. 
Subsequently he served in General Johnson's army, seeing much hard 
service, and at Bentonville, North Carolina, was severely wounded. On 
completing a valiant service, he returned to his farm in Dickson county, 
where he continued to follow the occupation of agriculturist until his 
death, in November, 1905. In his early life Mr. Larkins studied to enter 
the ministry of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, but after a short 
time gave his attention to other pursuits, and in the latter years of his 
life was aflBliated with the Methodist Episcopal church South. In 
political matters he was a Democrat, but was never desirous of holding 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1431 

public office. Mr. Larkins married Elizabeth Corlen, who was bom in 
Dickson county in 1843, and they had a family of nine children, as fol- 
lows: Susan Blake, who married John Loggins; Postina, who became 
the wife of Van E. Elazer; Zanie; Eula Frances, who married T. M. 
Overton; Melbia, who married Miner Elazer; S. F., living in Dickson; 
Dr. Herbert Ewing; and Wellington and Virgie, living at home. 

Herbert Ewing Larkins received his early education in the public 
schools of Charlotte, following which he became a student in Durkin 
College, there receiving the degree of Bachelor of Laws. In 1909 he 
was graduated from the University of Nashville with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine, and since that time has been engaged in practice at 
Charlotte. His abilities here were soon recognized and as the generous 
and sympathetic nature behind the skill of hand and professional judg- 
ment became appreciated his practice continued to rapidly increase. At 
this time he is known as one of the leading practitioners of the younger 
generation, and as such holds a deservedly high place in the respect of 
his professional colleagues and of the public at large. Dr. Larkins is 
inclined to favor the Democratic party, but reserves the right to vote 
independently, regardless of party lines, and the duties of his large 
practice have precluded any thought of entering the public arena in 
search of preferment. 

On June 29, 1910, Mr. Larkins was married to Miss Eva Corlen, 
daughter of J. K. and Betty Corlen, of Charlotte, and this union has 
been blessed by the birth of one son: Wilmer Holland, bom February 
13, 1912. 

RjCHARD H. Phillips. Especially fortunate in the quality of her 
journalism, Waverly is the home of the Humphreys County Democrat, 
organized and conducted by Richard H. Phillips. He is a native of 
Humphreys county, where he has hosts of friends. 

In family origin, Mr. Phillips is of combined Missouri and Tennessee 
. parentage. His father, James Phillips (1837-1881) was bom in Mis- 
souri, where he lived until 1861. Coming at that time to Tennessee, he 
discontinued his occupation of blacksmith and wagon-maker while serv- 
ing in the Confederate army. Enlisting in Forrest's Cavalry under 
Captain Randall, in Hickman county, he served through the war. Given 
a furlough in 1863 he was apprehended on his way back to his regi- 
ment and was taken prisoner near the Hickman county line. He made 
a desperate fight for his liberty, receiving no less than seven wounds in 
the encounter, and was taken to Camp Chase, where for nearly twa 
years he lay in prison, before his exchange was accomplished. Those 
long, horrible months were not without seriously detrimental effect upon 
his physical constitution. Much broken in health, he returned to Ten- 
nessee, where he resumed his place among his family and friends. He 
had been married in Humphreys county in 1863 to Miss Sarah Plant 



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1432 . TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

(bom in Stewart county in 1840), and as years passed they became the 
parents of six children. With this family he presently removed, in 1875, 
to Hickman county, Kentucky, where he continued to work at his trade 
during the remainder of his life. He is remembered as a Democrat of 
decided opinions. He was a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons at Clinton, Kentucky, and of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Of the latter his wife, Sarah Plant Phillips was also a member. She 
survived him for a number of years and in the course of that time 
remarried, becoming Mrs. Thomas A. Wiggin. Her earthly life closed 
in 1909, but Mr. Wiggin is still living, a resident of Humphreys county. 

Fifth of the children born to James and Sarah Phillips was the son 
whom they named Richard H., and whose career forms the chief subject- 
matter of this biographical review. His birth occurred on June 16, 1870, 
in Humphreys county, Tennessee. His education was pursued at Clin- 
ton College, Kentucky, and was supplemented by his very familiar 
acquaintance with the type-case, which early attracted his interest. He 
was, indeed, but thirteen years of age when his apprenticeship as a 
printer began. He learned this work with one W. A. Jones, a French- 
Canadian printer who was at that time engaged on the Times-Journal of 
Waring, Tennessee — a news sheet that is now no longer published. 

After this early apprenticeship, Mr. Phillips next followed the inter- 
esting and developing fortunes of a journeyman printer. For fifteen 
years he was thus engaged at various places. In June, 1910, he came to 
Waverly, purchased a new printing-plant and organized a weekly paper 
which he named the Humphreys County Democrat. This sheet, which 
is of course an organ of the good old Southern party, has proved to be 
very successful, having both a wide circulation and a good advertising 
patronage. Mr. Phillips is to be congratulated on the good results of 
the venture. 

In all political affairs of the city, county and state, as well as in great 
national affairs, Editor Phillips is actively interested. Social fraterni- 
ties also claim a due share of his attention, including him as a member 
in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Waverly lodge No. 104 ; and 
in the Knights of Pythias of Huntington (Tennessee) lodge No. 63. 
He is connected with the Presbyterian church of Waverly, that congre- 
gation also being the church home of Mrs. Phillips. 

As Miss Delia Blair Plant, of Humphreys county, Mrs. Phillips was 
very well and popularly known before her marriage. Her parents, J. H. 
and Mary E. Plant, represent one of the oldest of the families in this 
locality. Mr. Plant is a Confederate veteran and a man of prominence 
in the community. The year 1900 was the date at which Miss Plant 
became Mrs. R. H. Phillips. She and Mr. Phillips have welcomed four 
little daughters into their home. The eldest, Mary Lou, met a death all 
too tragic at the age of seven, when on January 26, 1908, her baby life 
was forever stilled by an explosion of blasting powder. Her sisters. 



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TENxNESSEE AND TEXNESSEANS 1433 

Ella Mae, Mattie Gould and Virginia, live to fill their parents' home 
with flower-like charm and with budding promises of the future. The 
editor and his family form a valued acquisition to the business, political 
and social interests of Waverly. 

Joseph Larry Byrn, M. D. The patronymic ''Byrn'' indicates with 
singular clearness the origin of the family of that name, and the house 
of Byrn was first established in America by Larry Byrn, the great- 
grandfather of the subject of this brief review, who came from Ireland 
and settled in Tennessee, homesteading a piece of land at the head 
waters of Yellow Creek. Here the pioneer, then in, his young manhood, 
established a little grist mill, and one day he started to the mill with a 
load of corn. He was never seen again. The most thorough search was 
made throughout the country, but the miller was gone, his disappearance 
being as complete as if the ** earth had opened and swallowed him,'' to 
quote the proverbial statement. Indians frequented that section of the 
country in those days, and it was always supposed that he had been' 
attacked by a hostile band and made away with, but beyond conjecturing 
as to his possible fate, nothing was ever known. He left a young son, 
Larry, who grew to manhood in Dickson county, and there passed his 
early life as a farmer and saddler. He served in the Mexican war, and 
•after returning home, retired and led a quiet, peaceful life until death 
claimed him. 

S. M. Byrn, the son of Larry Byrn II., was bom, reared, educated 
and married in Dickson county, and there passed the greater part of 
his life. He was a farmer, merchant and stock trader, and led a busy 
life, his home and the center of his business activities being at Fowler 
Landing, in Humphreys county, to which county he moved in about 
1857. He was a prominent and well-to-do man, and at the outbreak of 
the Civil war he formed a company of light artillery, but not having an 
acquaintance with military tactics, Captain Lannie was placed in charge 
of the company, Mr. Byrn being first lieutenant. He served with 
valor until the battle of Fort Donelson, when he fell before the enemy's 
fire, his military career ending there. He was a Democrat, and a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church. He was ordained to preach in 
about 1860, but never occupied the pulpit regularly, although he had in 
previous years supplied whenever his services were in demand. He was 
a member of the Masonic fraternity. He was born in 1830, and was still 
a young man when he died in battle. He married Sarah Rogers, born in 
Dickson county in 1831, their marriage taking place there in 1848. Four 
children were born to them, Dr. Joseph Larry Byrn being the eldest of 
that number, and but one other besides himself being alive today — 
Mollie, the widow of P. J. Davis. 

Dr. Byrn was educated in the public schools of his native community 
and under the instruction of Dr. E. E. Larkins, at Charlotte. Following 



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1434 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

that he engaged in the timber business for some two years, after which 
he opened a store at Beggarville, which he conducted for six years. He 
then entered a medical school at Cincinnati, the Eclectic Medical Col- 
lege, and in 1886 took his degree of Doctor of Medicine. He began the 
practice of his profession at Beggarsville, Humphrey county, in the 
same year, and here he continued until 1895, when he went to Union 
City, there continuing in practice until 1897. He then came back to 
Humphrey county and settled on a farm near Plant, and here he is 
engaged in farming and in practicing his profession, dividing his atten- 
tion between the two occupations. He has a fine place of one hundred 
and sixty acres which he keeps up in a most admirable manner, and is 
as prominent as a successful farmer as he is in his medical capacity. 

In 1872 Dr. Byrn was united in marriage with Miss Annie Bone, the 
daughter of John Bone, of Beggarsville, and they have seven children : 
Eddye Lee, of Hickman, Kentucky; Nancy Cornelia, married John 
Warren, of Humphrey county; Carrie Willie, of Camden, Tennessee; 
William Joseph, of Hickman, Kentucky; Fannie, the wife of Roscoe 
White; Stella, married John Fowler and lives in Camden, Tennessee; 
and Thomas A., who is at home. 

Dr. Byrn is an Independent Democrat, and fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, affiliating with Denver 
Lodge No. 606, and the Encampment at Waverly. He is a good citizen; 
a devoted family man, and enjoys the esteem and confidence of all who 
share in his acquaintance in the county which he has been identified with 
for so many years. 

John J. Jones. A stranger invariably forms his estimate of the 
enterprise and prosperity of a community from its buildings. If sub- 
stantial and of tasteful and appropriate design it betokens a thrifty and 
progressive order of citizenship. The contractor, builder and architect 
is therefore a very important factor in infiuencing and shaping the 
material advancement of a community, for his tastes, knowledge and 
judgment are largely relied upon by those who have need of his ser- 
vices. It is this line of endeavor to which John J. Jones, of Union City, 
Tennessee, has directed his attention throughout his business career. 
By nearly twenty years of experience as a carpenter and twelve years 
of successful activity as a contractor he became well qualified to take a 
place among the leading contractors of Union City upon his location 
there in 1910, and this he has done. In the two intervening years since 
then he has been more than kept busy, for in 1911 sixteen houses were 
erected under his direction and thus far in 1912 the number has reached 
eleven, two of them being large store buildings. His work extends to 
Hickman, Mayville and Fulton, Kentucky, and he averages ten workmen 
in his employ. Mr. Jones is not only a skilled mechanic but he also 
understands the work of the architect and usually draws up his own 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1435 

plans. The whole period of his independent axitivity has been given to 
this line of work. 

John J. Jones was born in 1875 at Mayfield, Kentucky, where he 
grew up, received his education and learned his trade. He is the youngest 
of six children that came to his parents, H. R. Jones and Sarah Adcock 
Jones, both of whom were natives of Kentucky. In 1886 was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Jones and Miss Lulu M. Ryckman and to their 
union have been bom three children, viz. : John R., James E. and Mary 
Agnes. In church membership both Mr. and Mrs. Jones are identified 
with the Baptist denomination, and fraternally Mr. Jones is a member 
of the Woodmen of the World. They are most estimable young people 
and well worthy of the high respect and esteem accorded them by their 
associates. Pair dealing and integrity of purpose are evidently the 
principles adopted by Mr. Jones in his business transactions and by his 
character and the success he has attained he well merits recognition 
among the representative men of Union City. 

Herman Deitzel, Jr. Scientific agriculture is no longer a high- 
sounding phrase, and farming, formerly an occupation in which the 
surplus sons of the old-time large families engaged as their natural 
and only means of livelihood, has been brought to the front as one of 
the professions and one that demands careful preparation and that 
returns sure and generous compensation. Each year witnesses remark- 
able progress along this line and to understand this aroused and con- 
tinued interest, the work carried on by the progressive and enterprising 
agriculturists must be considered. Among the farmers of this class 
found in Obion county, none have achieved better results than Herman 
Deitzel, Jr., whose valuable property of 380 acres of land, situated near 
Union City, has been brought up to the highest state of cultivation. Mr. 
Deitzel, although still a young man, has risen to a high place in his 
chosen calling, and his career has been marked by steady advancement 
and constant industry since early youth. He was born in Union City, 
Tennessee, in 1883, and is a son of Herman and Josephine (Cloys) 
Deitzel. His father, a native of Germany, emigrated to the United States 
in 1869, and in the following year came to Tennessee, where he spent 
tjie rest of his life in various pursuits, principally the hardware busi- 
ness, and became a successful man. He and his wife were the parents 
of ten children, of whom seven are still living, and Herman is the second 
in order of birth. 

Herman Deitzel, Jr., was reared and educated in his native city, and 
what time he could spare from his studies he spent in working in his 
father's store, thus demonstrating an industrious spirit at the age of 
ten years. Ambitious and thrifty, he carefully saved his earnings, hav- 
ing decided to become a farmer, and on reaching his majority he invested 
his capital in a tract of land near Union City. He at once engaged in 



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1436 tennp:ssee and tennesseans 

agricultural pursuits, and as the years have passed he has added to his 
land from time to time, now having 380 acres in the highest productive 
state. Mr. Deitzel has not devoted his entire time to general farming, 
as stock raising and dairying have also held a part of his attention. His 
crops consist of corn, wheat, oats, clover, timothy and' alfalfa, and in 
1912 he devoted twenty acres to tomatoes. In his fine herd of 
Jerseys are to be found some of the best cattle in the state, and these 
animals always bring top-notch prices in the markets. His dairy herd 
consists of thirteen animals, and he also carries about twenty-five head 
of young stock, from which to draw and also to supply the home market. 
His breed of hogs are of a strain of superior quality, and well adapted 
for speedy growth and quick returns. Models of neatness, Mr. Deit- 
zePs farm buildings are in a first-class sanitary condition, are well ven- 
tilated and lighted with electricity, while his residence is modern in 
architecture and equipped with up-to-date conveniences. Modern 
machinery is used throughout the premises, and the entire property 
gives eloquent evidence of the presence of ability, thrift and good man- 
agement. Some there are who regard the tiller of the soil as one whose 
vocation is deserving of but little consideration. There can be no more 
erroneous idea. To the farms must the nation look for its sustenance, 
and to those agriculturists of Mr. DeitzePs class it owes a debt of grat- 
itude. Also from the farm have come some of the most public-spirited 
of any community's citizens, ready to support movements calculated to 
advance their localities and giving their time and means in the cause of 
education and morality. Mr. Deitzel belongs to this class, and has so 
conducted himself that he has the entire respect of his neighbors and 
fellow-citizens. 

On October 12, 1909, Mr. Deitzel was married to Miss Ella Harris, 
daughter of Anselpio Harris, of Obion county. 

Bascom C. Batts. Among the successful and prominent devotees of 
the great basic industry of agriculture Bascom C. Batts holds prestige 
as an agriculturist who is self made. He has ever been on the alert to 
forward all measures and enterprises projected for the good of the 
general welfare and he has served his community in various official posi- 
tions of important trust and responsibility. He has served as magistrate 
of Guthrie, Kentucky, for the past fourteen years, and for one term 
was judge of Todd county, Kentucky. He is the owner of a finely 
improved farm of two hundred and seventy -five acres, the same being 
located some miles distant from Quthrie. 

August 25, 1854, in Robertson county, Tennessee, occurred the birth 
of Bascom C. Batts, who is a son of Jeremiah and Mary Ann (Byrnes) 
Batts, the former of whom was born in North Carolina, August 16, 1804, 
and the latter of whom was a native of Robertson county, Tennessee, 
where she was bom May 8, 1810. Jeremiah Batts came to Tennessee 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1437 

with his parents when he was a child of but six weeks old. The family 
located in Sumner county and remained there for one year, at the end 
of which removal was made to Robertson county. In the latter place 
the young Jeremiah was reared to maturity and educated and his entire 
active career was devoted to agricultural pursuits. He died in Robert- 
son county December 27, 1886, and his cherished and devoted wife 
passed away February 8, 1867. They were the parents of thirteen 
children, of whom Bascom C. was the youngest in order of birth. Jere- 
miah Batts was a son of Jeremiah Batts, Sr., who, after locating in 
Robertson county, here purchased a section of land for fifty cents per 
acre. He was a well-to-do farmer and a slave owner. The matfernal 
grandfather of the subject of this review was James Byrnes, who was 
born and reared in Virginia and who was an early settler in Robertson 
county, Tennessee, where he was a saw-mill man and a farmer. Jere- 
miah Batts, Jr., was a Democrat in politics and he served as a magis- 
trate for a period of thirty years prior to his demise. In religious mat- 
ters he and his wife were devout members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

To the public schools of Cedar Hill, Tennessee, Bascom C. Batts is 
indebted for his preliminary educational training, which was later sup- 
plemented with a course of study in Vanderbilt University at Memphis. 
He early began to assist his father in the work and management of the 
old home farm, a part of which he later owned. He bought his present 
finely improved estate of two hundred and seventy-five acres in Todd 
county, Kentucky, and here has since maintained his home. His polit- 
ical allegiance is given to the Democratic party, in the local councils 
of which he has long been an active factor. For the past fourteen years 
he has served as a magistrate and for one year was county judge. He is 
a man of fine mentality and broad human sympathy. He thoroughly 
enjoys home life and takes great pleasure in the society of his family 
and friends. He is always courteous, kindly and affable and those who 
know him personally accord him the highest esteem. Ilis life has been 
exemplary in all respects and he has ever supported those interests 
which are calculated to uplift and benefit humanity, while his own hii^h 
moral worth is deserving of the highest commendation. He is a Mason 
and a member of the Knights of Honor. 

May 12, 1880, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Batts to Miss 
Lizzie "Wood, a daughter of Jonathan Wood, who was a hardware mer- 
chant at Clarksville for a number of years. Mr. and Mrs. Batts have 
one son, B. F., who is studying law in Jonesboro, Arkansas. The Batts 
family are devout members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

William M. Green, D. D. In 1907, after half a century of contin- 
uous service in behalf of his church. Dr. W. ^I. Green retired from the 
duties which had absorbed his energies for so long, and is now quietly 



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1438 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

spending his declining years at the home of his son-in-law, James H. 
Parkes, in Nashville vicinity. Dr. Green's career has had an impor- 
tant influence for the promotion of religion and benevolence in Tennes- 
see and the South, and he has been one of the most eminent figures in the 
Methodist church South. Besides the accomplishments of his own life 
time, he also represents some of the oldest and most prominent families 
in Tennessee, and his relationship has been with men who were pioneers 
of the church and in public affairs in Tennessee. 

William M. Green is a native of the city of Nashville, bom October 
17, 1838, a son of Alexander L. P. and Mary Ann (Elliston) Green. 
The founder of the family in Tennessee was the paternal grandfather, 
George Green, who married Judith StiUman. Grandfather Green was 
a native of Maryland, and was married in Albemarle county, Virginia, 
in 1776. He then entered the Revolutionary war, and served as a 
patriot soldier until its close. He was with the central division under 
Campbell in the battle of King's Mountain. When the war was over 
he went back to his home in Virginia, gathered his family and posses- 
sions together, and then crossed the mountains into east Tennessee. 
He later moved to Alabama, where his death occurred. By occupation 
he was a farmer, and one of the pioneers who cleared out his share of 
the wilderness, and did much to plant civilization on a solid foundation. 
The maternal grandparents of Dr. Green were John and Ann T. (Rid- 
ley) Elliston. John Elliston, a native of Kentucky, came to Tennessee 
when a young man and with his uncle opened the first silversmith store 
in Nashville. The Ellistons were noted as business men in early Ten- 
nessee. Grandfather Elliston manufactured probably the greater part 
of the jewelry which was sold from his store, and much of the tableware 
which was used by early families in Nashville and vicinity came from 
his establishment, and he also made many of the old tall clocks which 
stood in the comers of some of the old homes. 

The history of Southern Methodism gives a prominent place to the 
late Alexander L. P. Green. He was born in Sevier county, Tennessee, 
June 26, 1806, and died July 15, 1874. Educated in the common schools 
of Sevier county and in northern Alabama, he began preaching when a 
very young man, and in his time was one of the leaders of the church. 
He continued active work in the ministry until 1871, at which time he 
was chosen treasurer of Vanderbilt University. He was likewise suc- 
cessful in a financial way, and at the time of his death was owner of 
considerable property in Nashville. He and his wufe were the parents 
of five children, only two of whom are now living, one being Dr. Green, 
and the other Anna, who married Rev. R. A. Young, whose name is 
familiar in Tennessee Methodism. The elder Dr. Green was in politics 
a Whig until war time. He held the pastorate of McKendree church at 
Nashville, was pastor at Franklin and was one of the old-time circuit 
riders during his younger years. The greater part of his career was 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1439 

spent as a presiding elder. When a young man he was assistant to an 
older brother as commissioner of the Cherokee Indians in northern Ala- 
bama for three years, and it is related that during that time he never 
had a hat on his head. Later he was one of the commissioners who 
founded Vanderbilt University at Nashville. When the Methodist 
church of America was divided in 1844, the late Mr. Green had a more 
than passive part in that division, and was one of the leaders in the 
organization of the M. E. church South in 1845. 

Dr. William M. Green, when a boy, attended the private school main- 
tained by Alfred Hume, who in his time was one of the leading educa- 
tors of Tennessee. He later was a student in the University of Nash- 
ville, and entered the ministry and began his first pastorate in June, 
1858, continuing until 1907. He later served a time as agent for the 
Sunday school board in the Church Publishing House, and for four years 
was associate editor of the Midland Methodist. In the Tennessee con- 
ference, Dr. Green is familiarly known as **Four Year Billy Green,'* 
^wing to the many pastorates and other positions of church service 
which he filled for the exact periods of four years. He was pastor at 
Columbia for four years, Franklin four years, Gallatin four years. West 
End four years, and divided a period of eight years between the Nash- 
ville City Mission and the North Nashville Mission. He wound up his 
period as a minister with four years at the South End church. His 
work in the pulpit and as a pastor has also been interspersed with much 
literary and administrative accomplishments. From his pen were con- 
tributed seventy-five short sermons that were published in the Nash- 
viUe American, He also wrote the life of his father. Also should be 
noted his assistance rendered to the city in opening the street car trans- 
fer station, and his co-operation with the board of trade a number of 
years ago when he suggested changing many of the names used to 
numerals in the revised nomenclature of the streets of Nashville. 

Dr. Green was married September 25, 1866, to Josephine Searcy, 
•daughter of Dr. William W. and Emeline (Johnson) Searcy. The 
Searcy family is one of the oldest and most prominent in Tennessee. 
Dr. Searcy was horn in Nashville, was a physician who practiced in this 
city and vicinity for half a century, and was a man of splendid education 
and many high attainments, which he devoted unselfishly to the work 
of his profession and to the welfare of society. He was a graduate of 
the University of Nashville and, later, of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. Frequent articles came from his pen and were published in 
medical journals and newspapers. Dr. Searcy was bom in March, 1810, 
and died in March, 1874. His father was Col. Robert Searcy, a promi- 
nent lawyer and judge of Tennessee, who fought with General Jackson 
in the early years of the century. Judge Searcy was an influential 
Mason, and it is noteworthy here that he made the long journey by 
horseback to North Carolina, and obtained the charter for the first 



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1440 TENNESSEE AND TEXNESSEANS 

^fasonic lodge in Nashville. Dr. Green and wife were the parents of 
two children, namely: ]\Irs. James H. Parkes, whose husband is one of 
the leading business men of Nashville; and Frank Searcy Green, who 
is in business with J. H. Fall & Company of Nashville. The son has 
iuherited his father's love for literature and has collected quite a choice 
library. Mrs. Parkes is a graduate of Columbia School, and has much 
literary ability, and is the author of a book of travels. Dr. Green has 
been for years a member of the Masonic order and is independent in 
politics. He is the owner of considerable property in Nashville, but his 
best possessions consist in his disinterested services to his church and 
to society. 

Robert J. Stone. One of the public-spirited and progressive agri- 
culturists of Cheatham county, Tennessee, is Robert J. Stone, residing 
near Neptune, a young man of sterling personal qualities and of good 
education who through sagacious and sapient business ability has 
achieved no uncertain success in a financial way and as a citizen of the 
progressive stamp has become one of the foremost men of his commu- 
nity. He has twice represented Cheatham county in the Tennessee state 
legislature, each time with credit to himself and to his constituents, and 
has always taken a loyal interest in all affairs relating to the civic 
progress of his community and state. 

Robert J. Stone was born in Dickson county, Tennessee, March 15, 
1878, a son of Robert B. Stone and a grandson of Hardaman Stone, 
both of whom were at one time prominently identified with iron manu- 
facture in this section of Tennessee. Robert B. Stone, the father, was 
born in Dickson county, Tennessee, in 1847, and is yet living, being now 
a resident of Cumberland Furnace, Dickson county. He first entered 
the iron business with A. W. Vauley, subsequently serving for many 
years as general manager for the DrouUard Iron Company at Cumber- 
land Furnace, of which he w^as also one of the stockholders. When the 
company disposed of its interests there Mr. Stone, with H. C. Merritt, 
H. N. Leach, E. H. Stine and W. H. Neblett as partners, bought all of 
the stock and lands of the concern, the latter comprising some 20,000 
«cres, and divided the land into small tracts ranging from fifty to five 
hundred acres. They have now disposed of practically all of this. ]\Ir. 
Stone now deals in cattle and stock and among his extensive personal 
realty holdings is eight hundred acres of farm land in Cheatham 
county. He has been very successful in business affairs and his accom- 
plishments in a financial way represent the application of shrewd busi- 
ness acumen and years of industrious and energetic endeavor, for he 
began his career with very limited advantages in the way of capital 
The old Droullard home at Cumberland Furnace also passed into his 
possession and is his present residence. During the Civil war he served 
in the Confederate army under General Forrest one year, or until the 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEAXS 1441 

surrender of Fort Donelson. He has always been a Democrat in politi- 
cal adherency, and fraternally is affiliated with the Masonic order as a 
Tuember of the blue lodge, chapter and commandery. He is a commu- 
nicant of the Episcopal church. Hardaman Stone, his father, was born 
in North Carolina and came to Tennessee as a young man, subsequently 
becoming an iron manufacturer and a wealthy man for his day. He 
helped to build the Nashville & Memphis Railroad. Robert B. Stone has 
been twice married. His first wife was Miss Sarah Jackson, who was 
born in Dickson county, Tennessee, in 1842, and passed away in 1882, 
a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church. She was a 
<laughter of Epps Jackson, an early settler in Tennessee and a promi- 
nent iron manufacturer who operated the old Carroll furnace in Dick- 
son county for many years. To this union were born six children, 
Robert J., our subject, being one of four now living. In 1886 he took as 
his second companion Miss Kate Richardson, who is yet living. 

Robert J. Stone, our immediate subject, grew up in Dickson county 
and was educated in the Edgewood Normal School and at Cumberland 
University, from which latter institution he was graduated in 1900. 
He entered into independent business activity as a farmer and stockman 
in Cheatham county and has continued thus identified to the present 
time. He owns 1,000 acres in this county, raises tobacco, corn and hay 
and feeds many cattle and hogs. He is especially interested in Hereford 
cattle and owns a fine herd of that strain, and in every respect is keenly 
awake to the advanced agricultural spirit of the day. 

In December, 1900, Mr. Stone was united in marriage to Miss Lola 
Russell, of Franklin, Kentucky, and to their union have been bom three 
daughters, Lucile, Emily Katherine and Lola. Mrs. Stone is a member 
of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Stone affiliates with the Knights of 
Pythias and the Sigma Alpha Epsilon college fraternity. Politically 
he is a Democrat and during his two terms as a member of the Tennes- 
see state legislature he was chairman of the waterways and drainage 
committee anti was a member of the judiciary, agricultural and other 
committees, his whole service being that of the ablest order. As a young 
man of ambition, character and ability he has put intelligence and energi- 
into all of his undertakings and ranks among the most forceful men 
and the most respected citizens of Cheatham county. 

Charles Eben Noethrup. One of the most successful business 
men of Gallatin, a lumberman who has been a resident of this city since 
1894, Mr. Northrup began life a poor boy, but at the end of eight years 
had accumulated a considerable fortune of thirty thousand dollars. 
Then owing to business reverses, the result of the panic of the early 
nineties, he lost most of this, although he did not become bankrupt. It 
was at the conclusion of this unfortunate epoch in his life that he came 
to Tennessee, and since the first years has been steadily prospering and 



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1442 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

is now reckoned one of the substantial men and influential citizens of 
Gallatin. 

Mr. Northrup was born in Steuben county, New York, February 10, 
1854, a son of William H. and Sarah (Tompkins) Northrup. Both of 
them were natives of that state. The paternal grandfather was named 
Ebenezer Northrup, who was bom in New Jersey, later moving into 
New York state, where he followed farming, and where his death 
occurred. The maternal grandfather was John Tompkins, who married 
Julia Jordan. Both were natives of New York, and at an early date 
moved into the state of Ohio. The wife of John Tompkins made one 
return trip to New York on horseback. 

William H. Northrup, the father, was bom February 8, 1828, and 
died in June, 1907. His wife was bom in August, 1827, and died March 
1889. William H. Northrup in his early career moved to Ohio, where 
he became a soldier of the Union, with the Fifty-fifth Ohio Infantry, 
and served three years. Most of his service was in the army hospitals. 
Following the war he settled on a farm in Michigan, where he died. 
He and his wife had five children, C. E. being the second in number. 
The parents were both members of the Baptist church and the father 
was a Republican in politics. 

Mr. Northrup in his early life attended the Michigan country schools 
and made his start in the world as a farmer. As already mentioned, he 
became quite successful, accumulating property which was valued at 
about thirty thousand dollars, and was considered one of the most pros- 
perous and substantial men of his community up to the panic of '93,. 
which involved him as it did thousands of other honorable and seemingly 
substantial citizens of this country. While he got out of the situation 
with honor and was not a bankrupt, paying a hundred cents on the 
dollar, yet the misfortune was sufficient to cripple him for the time. 
In 1894 he moved to Gallatin, since which time his prosperity has con- 
tinued to go forward. He has a large lumber business and planing milla 
and ships his products throughout this vicinity. He is also owner of a 
large amount of timber lands and farm property. 

He was married in 1882 to Miss Delia Heath, who was born in Mich- 
igan, and whose death occurred March 28, 1904. Mr. and Mrs. North- 
rup were the parents of two children. Eva married Arthur Workins 
and now lives in Gfillatin; Frank H. is associated with his father in 
business. In September, 1906, Mr. Northrup married Anna Branson, 
whose maiden name was McLaughlin. She was bom in the state of 
Pennsylvania. They are members of the Presbyterian church, and he is 
affiliated with the Masonic order. In politics he is a Progressive 
Republican. 

John H. G. Slaughter. At St. Bethlehem in Montgomery county 
the leading business man and citizen for many years has been John H. 



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^XX ^<rt.^.^2tc.-^^cZlO 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1443 

G. Slaughter. He was for twenty years the postmaster of that town and 
is now the magistrate of his home district. The agricultural implement 
and hardware business now conducted under his name, and one of the 
most prosperous mercantile enterprises in this part of the county, was 
founded by him in 1887. 

Mr. Slaughter was born in Christian county, Kentucky, April 2, 
1862, a son of G. H. and Amelia (Bowman) Slaughter. The paternal 
grandfather, Henry Slaughter, was a native of North Carolina, whence 
he moved to Tennessee, and became a large planter and slave owner 
before the war. The maternal grandfather, John Bowman, a native of 
Virginia, was a farmer and miller, and also owned many slaves. 

The father, G. H. Slaughter, was bom in North Carolina in 1828, 
and was a child when his family came west to Tennessee. For a number 
of years his home was in Nashville, where as agent for the Nashville, 
Chattanooga & St. Louis Railroad he had the distinction of selling the 
first railroad ticket in Nashville. He act^d as teller in one of the Nash- 
ville banks for a long time, and was very influential as a citizen. It 
was due to his efforts that the streets of that city were first given num- 
ber and names. A Democrat in politics, he was for thirty years a justice 
of the peace, and was a member of the lower house of the legislature 
two terms and for two terms was in the state senate. He belonged to 
the Missionary Baptist church, while his wife was a member of the 
Christian denomination. His death occurred in 1897, while his wife, 
who was bom in Kentucky in April, 1837, died on December 25, 1909. 
They were the parents of four children, namely : MoUie, the wife of W. 
B. Whitfield, of St. Bethlehem ; John H. G. ; Sallie, the widow of E. P. 
Liggin, and May, the wife of B. W. Meriwether. 

During the youth of John H. G. Slaughter the family lived in Mont- 
gomery county, and in this county he received his education partly in 
the country schools and at Clarksville. Farming was the occupation 
to which he was reared and to which he gave a number of years, until 
1887, when he established the business at St. Bethlehem which he has 
since built up to such successful proportions. He also owns a farm in 
this county. What he has acquired in business has been the result of his 
own efforts, for he has always been industrious and has never departed 
from the conservative, substantial roads which lead to material success. 
In politics he is a Democrat, is affiliated with the Woodmen of the 
World, and he and his wife are members of the Christian church. 

He was married in February, 1884, to Miss Ettie Watts. Her father. 
Dr. D. A. Watts, was a prominent physician and druggist of Paducah, 
Kentucky, which was her early home. Mr. and Mrs. Slaughter are the 
parents of two children, Julia and Harry, both at home. 

Robert Edward Lee Mountcasti^e. A notable success in the law, 
together with prominence in affairs of citizenship, has combined to pro- 



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1444 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

mote Mr. Mountcastle to a front rank among Knoxville lawyers. He 
has been a member of the bar of this state for more than a quarter of 
a century and at the present time is a member of the well-known law 
firm of Shields, Gates & I\Iountcastle, whose offices are in the Empire 
building at Knoxville. 

Robert E. Lee Mountcastle was born at Jefferson City, Tennessee, 
February 21, 1865. The family is one of Scotch-Irish ancestry and 
descent, and long since settled in Tennessee, its earlier ancestors having 
belonged to that vigorous race of Scots who first settled in the moun- 
tain districts of western Pennsylvania, Virginia and the Carolinas, and 
subsequently moved down the slopes of the Allegheny into the Ohio 
valley. A. J. and Cornelia Frances (Williams) Mountcastle were the 
parents of seven children, including the Knoxville lawyer. As a boy 
Mr. Mountcastle attended the common schools and in June, 1880, was 
fc^raduated from Carson and Newman College at Jefferson City, with 
the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He also took B. A. degree at the Wash- 
ington and Lee University at Lexington, Virginia, in 1882, and after 
his admission to the bar practiced law at Lynchburg for seven years, 
then removed to Morristown and became a partner with Senator-elect 
John K. Shields and his father, Jas. T. Shields. lie removed to Knox- 
ville in 1902 and entered the firm of Shields, Cates & Mountcastle, of 
which he is now a member. 

Mr. Mountcastle, it will not be denied, is one of the strongest Dem- 
ocratic leaders in Tennessee. In 1904, at St. Louis, he was elected a 
member of the national Democratic executive committee, and he has 
*jontinued to retain that position. His seat upon the committee was 
contested in 1912 by Col. John J. Vertrees, but he w^as retained by the 
committee, only one vote being cast for the contesting candidate. Mr. 
Mountcastle has never aspired to political office. In the free and untram- 
meled judiciary campaign of 1910, as it was known, he was one of the 
most active leaders in the interest of the candidates on the free and 
untrammeled ticket. It was because of his support of the judiciary that 
the so-called regular Democratic state convention, which nominated a 
candidate for governor, declared the place of Mountcastle upon the 
national committee to be vacant, and Colonel Vertrees elected to the 
office, but as has already been mentioned, Mr. Mountcastle was retained 
on the committee. He was re-elected to the committee by the national 
Democratic convention at Baltimore, over Senator Nat Baxter, Jr. 

In 1902-03 Mr. Mountcastle was president of the State Bar Asso- 
United States senate, Mr. Mountcastle was the manager of Judge 
Shields, a place in which he performed most excellent work in the inter- 
ests of his colleague. He is admitted to be one of the ablest floor leaders 
in Tennessee in a political convention, as well as one of the ablest plead- 
ers at the bar. 

In the recent campaign of Judge Shields for the election to the 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1445 

ciation, of which he has long been a member. He is affiliated fraternally 
with the Masonic order and he and his family are members of the Pres- 
byterian church. 

Mrs. Mountcastle, prior to her marriage, which took place in 1890, 
was Miss Eliza Bird Solomon, a daughter of E. Y. Solomon. The chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Mountcastle are Louise, Paul, Fred and Mar 
guerite. The family residence is at 1405 Laurel avenue. 

Steward D. Tinsley. A representative agriculturist of Montgomery 
county, Steward D. Tinsley is a well-known resident of Southside, where 
his large and well-appointed farm gives substantial evidence of the 
excellent care and skill with which it is managed. He was bom January 
5, 1851, in Montgomery county, a son of Oliver Tinsley. His grand- 
father, Lindsey Tinsley, came from Virginia, his native state, to Ten- 
nessee at an early day, and for a number of years thereafter ran the 
ferry at Nashville. 

Born in Amherst county, Virginia, in 1815, Oliver Tinsley was but a 
boy when he came with his parents to Tennessee. Acquiring his early 
education in Nashville, he remained in that city until 1838, when he 
accepted a position with Robert Baxter, of Montgomery county, for 
whom he managed a furnace for ten years. He subsequently managed 
another furnace for twenty years, when he purchased from its owner 
the entire plant, including the furnace, land and other property. Turn- 
ing his attention then to agricultural pursuits, he carried on general 
farming until his death, in 1884. An able business man, he acquired a 
handsome property, at the breaking out of the war between the states 
being worth about $60,000. During the conflict he lost all of his per- 
sonal property, but retained about two thousand acres of land. He 
was a stanch member of the Democratic party, and belonged to the 
Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons. He married Eliza Har- 
per, who was born in 1815 in Tennessee, her father, David Harper, 
having come to this state from North Carolina in early life. She lived 
to a ripe old age, passing away September 13, 1906. She was a most 
estimable woman, and a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. Nine children were born of their union, one of whom, B. W. 
Tinsley, served in the Civil war as a member of the Fourteenth Ten- 
nessee Volunteer Infantry. 

The youngest member of the parental household, Stewart D. Tins- 
ley, received a limited education in the district schools, which he attended 
as opportunity offered, at other times assisting in the care of the home 
farm. Being industrious and economical, he began in early life to accu- 
mulate money, and invest it in land and other property. Successful in 
his undertakings, Mr. Tinsley has now a fine farm of upwards of five 
hundred acres of land, and in addition owns a grist mill, a saw mill, 

Vol. V— 1 



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1446 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

and a store. He makes a specialty of raising fine mules, and deals to a 
considerable extent in Hereford cattle and Berkshire hogs. 

On June 25, 1872, Mr. Tinsley was united in marriage with Ella 
Hunter, a daughter of Drew and Nancy A. (Dean) Hunter, who were 
bom, reared and married in Dickson county, Tennessee. Mrs. Tinsley 
is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church South, with 
which she united when young. Politically Mr. Tinsley is a Democrat, 
and has served in various public positions, having been constable two 
years, and sheriff six years, while for twelve years he was postmaster 
at Big Four. 

Fielding L. Pittman, general manager of the Union City Cotton 
Gin, Union City, Tennessee, is one of the enterprising, up-to-date young 
men of the town. He was born in Gibson county, Tennessee, in 1884, 
only child of L. G. H. and Lottie (Goodman) Pittman, both natives of 
the ''Volunteer" state. His maternal grandfather, Fielding Goodman, 
was a man of prominence and influence, a farmer with large land hold- 
ings in Central Tennessee, where he filled many local offices. For a 
number of terms he served as sheriff of Gibson county. Jle and his wife, 
Nancy (Robinson) Goodman, had four children, who became represent- 
ative citizens, engaged chiefly in agricultural pursuits. 

Fielding L. Pittman was reared on his father's farm and received 
his education in the common schools. His early life was spent in the 
study and practice of mechanical engineering. After three years 
devoted to this line of work, he turned his attention to the cotton busi- 
ness, and for the past two years has been identified as manager with the 
Union City Cotton Gin. This prosperous concern was incorporated in 
1910 by a company of Union City men, and Mr. Pittman, who up to that 
time had had ten years' experience in the business, was placed in 
charge, and to his efficiency as general manager is due the success of 
the company. The plant covers an area of two acres, and the output of 
the gin in 1911 was 1,600 bales of cotton. 

Mr. Pittman has numerous fraternal affiliations. He belongs to the 
F. and A. M., the O. E. S., the I. 0. 0. F., the W. 0. W. and the B. 
P. 0. E., in some of which he has served officially. He is a past 
noble grand of the I. 0. O. F. and a past commander of the W. 0. W. 
The only public office he has filled is that of revenue commissioner of 
Gibson county. 

Burton Sanderson. One of the enterprising general merchandise 
concerns at Oakwood in Montgomery county is that conducted by Bur- 
Ion Sanderson, who has employed a fine energy and ability to building 
up a trade which might be envied by many of the merchants of larger 
cities. 

Mr. Sanderson was bom in Stewart county, Tennessee, April 9, 1885, 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1447 

a son of Frank and Minnie (Harrison) Sanderson. Both parents were 
natives of Stewart county, where their respective families had early 
become established. The father was bom in 1850 and the mother in 
1852. After a common school education in such schools as then existed, 
Frank Sanderson began his career without capital and with reliance 
solely on his industry and honesty of purpose. Working by the day or 
month, he in time acquired the means to purchase a farm in Stewart 
county, where he gained a position among the substantial citizens. In 
1899 he sold his farm and moved to Montgomery county, where he owns 
a good homestead and is still an active producer of the agricultural 
crops. In politics he is a Democrat and he and his wife are members 
of the Christian church. Their seven children are named as follows: 
James E., a resident of Stewart county ; Gallic, a resident of Oakwood ; 
Viola, the wife of Hiram Foster, of Montgomery county ; Leonard, who 
lives with his parents; Burton; Ada, at home; and Mannie, a resident 
of Jordan Springs, Tennessee. 

The family having moved to Montgomery county when he was four- 
teen. Burton Sanderson finished his education in the district schools of 
this county, and while still a boy began working for his living and the 
meani^ for a larger career. After some years of industry he was able to 
start his general store in Oakwood in 1910, and since then he has been 
rapidly advancing to prosperity. He also owns a farm and gives it such 
attention as he can spare from his store. 

On July 5, 1911, Mr. Sanderson married Miss Gracie Ferrell. Her 
father is Drew Ferrell, for many years a Montgomery county farmer, 
and now proprietor of a store at Needmore in district No. 9. Mr. San- 
derson is a member of the Christian church and politically is a Demo- 
crat. 

C. C. Conn. Among the valued citizens of any community, are con- 
structive men, men who have genius and the ability to apply it in mate- 
rial development ; but when moral stamina and high ideals of what con- 
stitutes good citizenship are added to their assets for usefulness in 
society, they become true factors of development and progress, not only 
in a material way but along all lines. C. C. Conn, of Union City, Ten- 
nessee, is such a gentleman, a prominent contractor and builder who in 
this capacity has erected such structures there as the Nailing building, 
the D. J. Caldwell home, the Neblett home and the residences of Her- 
man Deitzel, C. T. Moss, G. B. and W. L. White, G. L. Porter, J. M. 
Brice, as well as numerous other less important, all mute testimony of 
the quality of his workmanship and his skill and taste as a builder. For 
the most part he is his own architect and works from his own plans. He 
has spent twenty-one years as a carpenter an4 the last ten years of that 
time he has also operated as a contractor. He has long been a resident 



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1448 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

of this vicinity, but first made his home in Union City about three and a 
half years ago. 

Bom in Obion county, Tennessee, in 1866, he was reared and edu- 
cated in his native county and began his chosen occupation as soon as he 
left school, following it successfully to the present time. He is a son of 
Jesse Conn and Louise (Waddle) Conn, the former of whom was born 
in York, Pennsylvania, while the latter was a native of Maury county, 
Tennessee. Jesse Conn migrated to Tennessee in 1861 and engaged in 
the milling and lumber business in Obion county, acquiring extensive 
business interests in this connection. By trade he was a carpenter and 
it was under his careful direction that his son learned carpentry and 
became a skilled workman. There were ten children in the elder Conn 
family, five of whom are living at this time. Of those surviving, 
two have followed agricultural pursuits and two are carpenters. They 
all have assumed worthy stations in society and have so ordered their 
lives as to command the respect of all who know them. Mr. Conn of this 
review is affiliated fraternally with the Masonic order, the Loyal Order 
of Moose and the Woodmen of the World. 

Joseph E. Beeder. In a day when truly successful editorship 
requires not only executive ability, but also originality, it is gratifying 
to happen upon such an able opponent of journalism as we find Joseph 
E. Reeder, editor of the New Idea, a leading Tennessee newspaper pub- 
lished at Burns, Tennessee. 

Genealogically Mr. Reeder is a product of Tennessee and other 
southern states, with a mingling of Pennsylvania blood. In the Key- 
stone state lived his maternal grandfather, Joseph Walp, and there was 
born the daughter of the latter. Miss Almira Anna Walp. Her birth 
occurred in 1862 and it was in her girlhood that she and the other mem- 
bers of her father's family came to Dickson, Tennessee, where ties of 
wifehood and motherhood awaited her. North Carolina had been the 
earlier home of the Reeder line. That state was the birthplace of John 
Reeder, paternal grandfather of him who is the special subject of this 
review. Tennessee was for a brief early period a chosen location of 
John Reeder, who there married a Miss Hall, a native of Dickson county. 
They removed thence to Mississippi, where they lived for some time, 
during which their son, J. H. L. Reeder, was born. The family later 
returned to Tennessee, which from the age of seven continued to be the 
home of J. H. L. Reeder. When the Civil war thrilled all hearts to 
anxiety and with fear or courage, according to their temperaments, he 
enlisted in Company K, Eleventh Tennessee, under General Forrest, and 
with him served in all important engagements. He held the rank of 
sergeant and the quality of his service may be well guessed from the 
fact that he was three times wounded. Of his scars, however, he has 
made little account, speaking of each as a slight affair. He participated 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1449- 

in thirty-one skirmishes and twenty-one battles during the four years of 
his service. He subsequently took up the study of medicine, which he 
practiced in Dickson county, where his rank was second to none and his 
practice during his life was one of the largest in the county. In 1876 he 
married Miss Almira Anna Walp, above referred to. They became the 
parents of eight children, of whom seven are yet living. Kate Reeder^ 
the eldest daughter, became Mrs. Charles A. Robinson, now of White- 
ville; Elzina is ]\Irs. George Harris, of Nashville; Joseph E., the eldest 
son, is the special subject of this review and of detailed account below ; 
Edward Reeder is one of the citizens of Bums ; Elmer C. Reeder is a res- 
ident of Kingston Springs, in Cheatham county. Miss Roma Reeder and 
her sister, Miss Alma, are members of the parental household. 

In District 4 of Dickson county, Joseph Eugene Reeder was bom on 
December 21, 1877. His education was, as he puts it, that of the country 
schools and of the type-case, for at the age of twenty he began his active 
career in a printing office. In combined capacities of printer and editor 
he served for some time the Home Enterprise^ a well-known publication. 
Resigning this position, he was connected for five years with the Daily 
American For one year he was a member of the stafif of reporters for 
the Nashville Banner, 

It was in 1905 that the New Idea was established at Burns by Mr. 
Reeder. In the meantime he held for five years his road position, but 
his present duties as editor and manager require his full attention for 
the two publications of which he has charge. The New Idea is issued 
weekly and is independently Democratic. Its inherent principles are 
those of the good old Southern party, but the paper is permeated with 
the spirit of progress which marks all genuinely wideawake enterprises 
and its strongest influence is the desire for the greatest good of the com- 
munity. This publishing plant also issues a monthly periodical of the 
magazine class, called The Home Defender, 

Mr. Reeder is personally a Democrat. His fraternal connections 
are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, with the Knights of 
Pythias and with the Modem Woodmen of America. His church inter- 
ests are broad in sympathy, but he is not formally connected with any 
church organization. Mrs. Reeder is a member of the Church of the 
Disciples. 

Editor Reeder's home was established in 1908, at which time he was 
united in marriage to Miss Jessie Mc Williams, daughter of W. Mc Wil- 
liams, of Dickson, Tennessee. Mr. Mc Williams is a native of Pennsylva- 
nia and Ohio was the birthplace of his daughter, Mrs. Reeder. In the 
social life of this locality, the Reeders occupy an important place. Editor 
Reeder 's human ihterests are as practical as they are wide, and his pub- 
lications attract extensive and favorable attention. His favorite avoca- 
tion is related to agricultural afifairs, as he owns a fine farm near the 
city. In whatever line his interests lie, however, all contribute to his 



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.1450 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

greater ability in acting as interpreter, through the press, of the chief 
needs and the highest principles of the people of this town and vicinity. 

Walter Harding Drane. Was born in Montgomery county and has 
passed his life thus far within its confines. His natal day was February 
8, 1870, and he is the son of William McClure and Amelia Washington 
(Haddox) Drane. 

William McClure Drane was bom in Clarksville in 1826, and died 
there on the 23d day of December, 1909. He was the son of W. H. 
Drane, a native of Montgomery county, Maryland, bom there in 1797, 
and he came as a boy with his father's family to the old settlement at 
Clarksville early in the nineteenth century. He was a physician, but 
eventually gave up his practice to engage in the tobacco business, in 
which he made an independent fortune, and he was ranked among the 
most eminent citizens of Clarksville of his time. His wife was Eliza J. 
McClure, a daughter of one of the oldest families in Montgomery county. 
His son, William McClure Drane, followed him in the tobacco business 
and like him was one of the most successful men of his community and 
time. He was active and prominent in the life of the county until his 
last years. His wife was born in Todd county, Kentucky, in 1836, and 
was a daughter of Joseph Haddox, a farmer and old resident of Todd 
county. She died in 1907. Eight children were bom to these parents. 

Walter Harding Drane received his early education in his home, 
under the supervision of a governess, but he later attended the public 
sdhools of Clarksville, finishing his education in the Southern Presbyte- 
rian University and the Broadhurst Institute of Clarksville. Being the 
youngest of the family, he remained in the home longer than any of the 
others and when he reached man's estate, busied himself in the care of 
the home place, a fine farm of two hundred and twelve acres. In addi- 
tion to this he rents some three hundred acres, his being one of the best 
improved properties in the country. He raises considerable tobacco, 
hay and com, and has a fine herd of registered Jerseys, of which he 
makes a specialty. He also is interested in Berkshire hogs and has a 
goodly representation of registered hogs on the place, as well as a num- 
ber of thoroughbred saddle horses, Montgomery Chief being sire of some 
of his finest horses. One of his favorite horses is Avelyn, now in the 
show ring, and she has already taken a number of prizes. 

Mr. Drane is a Democrat and is magistrate for district No. 7 of Mont- 
gomery county, being the first of the name to hold office of any kind. 
He is identified with a number of prosperous concerns, among which are 
the First National Bank and the Clarksville Ice & Coal Company. Mr. 
Drane is unmarried. 

Matthew Sanders. An enterprising and practical agriculturist, 
Matthew Sanders, of Montgomery county, is prosperously engaged in 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1451 

his chosen calling in district 18, where he owns and occupies the farm on . 
which his birth occurred, December 10, 1875. 

His father, the late Wiley Green Sanders, was bom in Dickson 
county, Tennessee, near Charlotte, in 1824, and was there reared. Soon 
after his marriage he began farming for himself in his native county, 
living there until 1867. Coming then to Montgomery county, he pur- 
chased two hundred acres of land in District 18, and by well-directed toil 
soon placed his estate in a fine condition. Here he lived until his death, 
which occurred in 1905, at an advanced age. He was a worthy and 
highly esteemed citizen, a Democrat in politics, and a consistent member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. South. The maiden name of his wife 
was Tillie Ava. She was born in 1830 in South Carolina, and died on 
the home farm, in Montgomery county, Tennessee, in 1903. Of the eight 
children bom of their union four are now living, as follows : Thomas, of 
Clarksville, Tennessee; Finney, a resident of Kentucky; Betty, wife of 
Daniel Proctor; and Matthew, the special subject of this brief personal 
narrative. 

As a boy and youth Matthew Sanders took advantage of his limited 
opportunities for advancing his education, and when out of school 
assisted his father on the home place, thus obtaining a practical knowl- 
edge of agriculture in various branches. Succeeding to the ownership 
of the home farm, Mr. Sanders has carried on the improvements previ- 
ously inaugurated, and has now a fine farm of one hundred and sixty- 
seven acres, on which he raises the staple products of the region, his 
principal crops being tobacco and com. 

Mr. Sanders married, December 5, 1902, Miss Hettie Eads, a daughter 
of J. S. Eads, and to them three children have been bom, namely : Annie 
Mae ; Roy, and Ava. Politically Mr. Sanders is a straightforward Demo- 
crat, and for the past six years has served as magistrate, an oflSce for 
which he is well qualified, and to which he was re-elected in 1912. He is 
also notary public, and a member of the Montgomery County High 
School Board, and for four years was a school director. Fraternally Mr. 
Sanders is a member of Palmyra Lodge, Ancient Free and Accepted 
Order of Masons ; of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; and of the 
Junior Order of United American Mechanics. Religiously he belongs to 
the Cumberland Presbyterian church, of which Mrs. Sanders is also a 
member. 

Robert F. Ferguson, M. D. Any biographical work of the represen- 
tative men of Tennessee would be decidedly incomplete did it not record 
the incidents in the career of one whose labors here have covered a 
period of more than thirty-five years, and whose long experience and 
acknowledged abilities place him in a foremost position among the pro- 
fessional men of Montgomery county, Robert F. Ferguson, M. D., of 
Clarksville. Dr. Ferguson belongs to one of the old and honored fam- 



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1452 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

ilies of the state, members of which have been prominent in various 
walks of life, and was born September 17, 1855, a son of Robert F. and 
Nancy ^I. (Barker) Ferguson. 

Robert French Ferguson, the paternal grandfather of Dr. Ferguson, 
was born in Pennsylvania, whence the family had come from Scotland 
at an early day. He was a preacher of the Christian church, and mar- 
ried Hannah Champlain Babcock, who was born in Stonington, Rhode 
Island. Among their children was Robert French Ferguson, Jr., who 
was born at Springfield, Massachusetts, February 10, 1815, and received 
his education at William and Mary College, Williamsburg, Virginia. 
With his brother, Jesse Babcock Ferguson, who subsequently became 
one of the greatest preachers Tennessee has ever known, Mr. Ferguson 
}*emoved as a young man to Howardsburg, Kentucky, and became engaged 
in publishing a newspaper. In 1844 he took up farming, and settled on 
the old Babcock farm in Montgomery county, Tennessee, having married 
Nancy M. Barker, who was born November 17, 1820, at ^*Cloverlands,'' 
a farm in Montgomery county. She was a daughter of John Barker, 
who was considered the richest man in the county. Mr. Ferguson became 
one of the leading agriculturists of his locality', and at the time of his 
death, May 12, 1882, owned 1,500 acres of land. He reared a family 
of nine children, of whom six still survive, and Robert F. was the sixth 
in order of birth. Mr. Ferguson was a Democrat, and was well known in 
political circles during his day, being sent to the state legislature, help- 
ing to reconstruct the state after the close of the Civil war, and lending 
his aid and influence to United States Senator James Bailey. He was 
prominent in journalistic work, frequently contributing to *the New 
York Tribune and the Cincivnati Enquirer, and was also active in the 
work of the Congregational church, erecting a church on his own farm, 
which he attended at the time of his death. His wife passed away in 
1884. 

John Barker Ferguson, son of Robert French Ferguson, Jr., was 
born March 7, 1858, at the farm known as * * Summertrees, * * which was 
named after an estate mentioned in one of Scott's works. The youngest 
of his parents' nine children, he received his education in the neighbor- 
hood schools, and subsecjuently received the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in the Southwestern Presbyterian University at Clarksville in 1877, 
following which he taught school for one year with Lyon Gardner Tyler, 
now president of William and Mary College, in a preparatory school 
at Memphis. He then taught two years in the neighborhood schools, but 
on the death of his father returned home and took charge of the home- 
stead place, of which he had charge until 1896. At that time he opened 
a preparatory school, and for eight years was engaged in conducting it, 
but since 1904 has devoted all of his attention to cultivating the soil. 
Like his father, Mr, Ferguson has taken a great deal of interest in church 
work, and has been lay reader for the Clarksville District of the Metho 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1453 

dist church, and was conference leader for one year. He is now District 
Hospital Commissioner for the Clarksville District, and president of 
the Methodist Sunday School Association. In politics a Democrat, he 
reserves the right to vote for the candidate he deems best fitted for the 
office, while his fraternal connection is with the Masons, he being master 
of his lodge. Mr. Ferguson 's 530 acres are in a high state of cultivation 
and, devoted to diversified farming, they yield large crops. On Novem- 
ber 7, 1883, Mr. Ferguson was married to Miss Carrie J. Morris, of 
Louisa county, Virginia, daughter of James Morris, and they have two 
children : Susanne and John B 

Robert F. Ferguson received his early education in the common 
schools, following which he went to the University of New York and the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, and graduated in medicine at Nash- 
ville in 1876. On receiving his degree, he returned to his home and began 
practice, entering with zeal upon the work for which he had been trained. 
Success met his efforts to such a degree that his practice now extends over 
three counties, and no man in his profession is held in higher respect or 
esteem. The constant opportunities for real estate investment and his 
inherent business abilities have enabled the Doctor to accumulate 350 
acres of valuable land, on which is situated his modem residence, and he 
has various other holdings and interests. He takes an active part in the 
work of the Montgomery County Medical Society, the Tennessee State 
Medical Society and the American Medical Association, and holds mem- 
bership in John Hart Lodge No. 103, and the local chapter of Masonry. 
In political matters Dr. Ferguson is a Democrat. 

In 1890 the Doctor was married to Miss Jennie F. Lester, daughter of 
Robert F. Lester, a native of Virginia. Mr. Lester was for some years 
a prominent merchant, and later entered the tobacco business, but the 
Civil war caused financial reverses and his last years were spent at the 
home of his son-in-law. Dr. and Mrs. Ferguson have three children; 
Jennie L., Mary Merriwether and Robert F., all at home. The family 
is connected with the Methodist church South, and both Dr. and Mrs. 
Ferguson have been identified with various movements of a religious and 
charitable character. 

Charles Nicholas Merriwether. Among the successful agricul- 
turists and large landowners of Montgomery county, the name of Charles 
Nicholas Merriwether holds prominent place. Given excellent educa- 
tional advantages and trained for a scientific career, he preferred to 
become a tiller of the soil, and such has been his success that he has never 
regretted his choice. Today he is the owner of 600 acres of highly culti- 
vated land, in district No. 6, on which he is annually raising large crops, 
and his many years of experience make him known as one of his section's 
acknowledged judges of agricultural conditions. Mr. Merriwether was 



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1454 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

bom February 14, 1849, in Arkansas, and is a son of I>r. James H. and 
liuey (McClure) Merriwether. 

Dr. Charles Merriwether, the paternal grandfather, was born in 
Virginia, and as a young man entered upon a medical career, the rest 
of his life being spent in practice in Kentucky and Tennessee. He was 
the first of the family to come to this state, where he secured the present 
farm of Charles N. Merriwether on a government grant, and here his 
death occurred, as did that of his wife, Mary (Walton) Merriwether. 
Among their children was James H. Merriwether, who was born in 1814, 
in Montgomery county, Tennessee, and who inherited the inclination 
of his father and followed in his footsteps as a physician. He was edu- 
cated in the University of Virginia and the University of Pennsylvania, 
receiving the degree of Doctor of Medicine from both institutions, fol- 
lowing which he practiced for the greater part of his life in Tennessee and 
Arkansas, but on his retirement went to Todd county, Kentucky. He 
was married in Montgomery county, Tennessee, to Lucy McClure, who 
was born at Clarksville, Tennessee, in 1822, daughter of James McClure, 
a native of the Keystone state, who emigrated to Tennessee at an early 
date. Dr. and Mrs. Merriwether had a family of eight children, of whom 
six are living : Lizzie, who married A. M. Barker ; Charles N. ; John H. 
and William D., of Todd county, Kentucky; Hunter McClure, of Clarks- 
ville, Tennessee ; and Gilmer, who lives in Kansas City, Missouri. 

Charles Nicholas Merriwether received his early education in the pub- 
lic schools, following which be attended Washington and Lee University, 
and at one time was a student under Gen. Robert E. Lee. On receiving 
his degree of Bachelor of Sciences, Mr. Merriwether took up civil engineer- 
ing and mining engineering at Birmingham, Alabama, in the manufac- 
ture of iron, but two years later made removal to Montgomery county, 
Tennessee. At this time he is the owner of the old family homestead of 
600 acres, located in District No. 6, near Trenton, Kentucky. Mr. Merri- 
wether raises diversified crops, and has been uniformly successful in 
his operations, owing to industry, intelligence and well-directed efforts. 
He believes in the use of modem machinery and up-to-date methods and 
takes pride in getting the best possible results from his land. Politically, 
Mr. Merriwether is a Democrat, but public life has not appealed to him, 
his achievements along agricultural lines satisfying his ambitions. With 
Mrs. Merriwether, he attends 'the Christian church, and all movements 
tending to advance religion, education and morality receive their 
co-operation and support. 

In 1873 ^Ir. Merriwether was married to Miss Kittie Tutweiler, 
daughter of Prof. Henry Tutweiler, of the University of Alabama, and 
six children have been born to this union, namely: Lucy, who married 
H. L. Patterson, of Montgomery county, Tennessee; Robert Tutweiler, 
living in Kansas City, Missouri ; Henry Tutweiler, of Mobile, Alabama ; 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1455 

Lennie, of Montgomery county ; and Nicholas Hunter and Peola Ash, who 
live at home with their parents. 

James Claibourne Hobbs. For three generations the charm of the 
fields has held this nature loving family, into which was born in Hum- 
phreys county, near the mouth of the BuflPalo river, James Claibourne 
Hobbs, on the 8th day of February, 1866. He was the third child of his 
parents, Jesse P. and Mary Louise (Darden) Hobbs, and is the only 
one of the three now living. Sorrow touched these parents heavily in 
the early death of three of their four children, and both died young in 
years, — the father when James C. was three years of age and the wid- 
owed mother about three years later. 

Jesse Hobbs was bom in Hickman county in 1836 and was the son 
of Claibourne Hobbs, himself the son of John Hobbs, the great-grand- 
father of the subject. John Hobbs came to Tennessee from his native 
state, Virginia, in an early day, and located in Hickman county, where 
he devoted himself to farming life. There his son Claibourne grew to 
young manhood and married Bose White, rearing a large family. 
This son came to Humphreys county in young manhood and settled on 
Duck river, and there, like his father, devoted himself to farm life. He 
owned a pleasant farm and was the owner of a quantity of slaves. His 
«on, Jesse P. Hobbs, came to Humphreys county as a young man and here 
married and settled down. He continued to be associated with his 
father in the farm work until he reached his majority, when he bought 
land of his own and began in an independent way. With the outbreak 
of the war he joined the Confederate forces, and served through the 
war with the rank of lieutenant. He was severely wounded in action at 
Fort Donelson, and was not sufficiently recovered to return to the ser- 
vice before the close of the war. He went to his home in Humphreys 
<3ounty when quiet was once more restored, but the young man. never 
regained his strength and died in 1869. His widow survived him for ten 
years. She was a member of the Baptist church. 

James Claibourne Hobbs was educated at Dickson College and Cum- 
berland University at Lebanon, taking his A. B. and A. M. degrees from 
Dickson and his LL. B. from Cumberland in 1897. In the same year he 
was admitted to the bar in Erin. He began practice with Herman Dun- 
bar, who opened a branch office in Nashville, and it was the expectation 
of Mr. Hobbs to join his partner in that city, but the death of Mr. 
Dunbar after an association of about two years changed his plan in that 
respect, and he has since continued in practice in Erin alone, with the 
exception of a period of five years when he was the business associate of 
Mr. J. E. Kennard. 

Mr. Hobbs has been active in politics and has deported himself in 
a manner highly creditable to him in his community with regard to his 
political service. He was chairman of the congressional committee for 



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1456 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

six years, and was elected to the state senate in 1899 on the Democratic 
ticket, serving in that body on the rural bills committee and on the com- 
mittee on ways and means. He has shown in a convincing manner that 
he knows good laws from poor ones, and that he knows something of what 
laws are wanting and how best to frame them for the ultimate good of 
the people. 

Mr. Hobbs is associated with a number of fraternal organizations, 
among them the Knights of Pythias, in which he has membership in 
Emerald Lodge No. 58, and the Order of Ben Hur, in which he is a mem- 
ber' of Erin Lodge. 

In 1890 Mr. Hobbs married Miss Nettie Helen McCauley, the daugh- 
ter of G. H. McCauley, of Erin. Eight children have been bom to these 
parents : Helen ; J. Moody ; Alice ; Flora Louise ; Mary Qustava ; Sarah 
Gertrude ; Doris and Floy. 

Mr. and ^Irs. Hobbs are members of the Presbyterian church of Erin, 
and have reared their family in that faith. They are among the most 
highly esteemed citizens of Erin, where they are popular in the best 
social activities of the town, and where their circle of friends is not 
smaller than that of their acquaintances. 

DouGL^vs K. COPPEDGE. Vocations of a scholarly sort have been those 
chosen by the successive representatives of the family line to which 
Douglas K. Coppedge belongs. The clerk of the Stewart county court 
has been known throughout his lifetime in this region, as were also both 
his parents. His paternal grandfather, Alexander Humphreys Cop- 
pedge, came in an early period from the adjacent commonwealth of North 
Carolina to the Volunteer state, where he promptly determined upon a 
location in the promising section of Stewart county. He married Miss 
Emmeline Elliot, who was also a North Carolinan by birth and youthful 
residence. Alexander Humphreys followed a profession which in those 
days was one of far greater difficulty and far less remuneration than now, 
— that of school-teaching. This work he pursued in Stewart county, 
where he spent the greater part of his life. There his children were born 
and educated. They were eleven in number, the youngest being Charles 
Coppedge, now well known in Stewart county, both in his own person 
and as the father of the subject of this sketch. Charles Coppedge 's birth- 
place was in District No. 6 of this county and the date of his birth was 
March 16, 1845. He was but an infant when his father died, and he early 
developed manly traits and an interest in those pursuits involving a con- 
siderable degree of brain work. His first self-supporting endeavors were 
carried on in the capacity of a bookkeeper for the Woods Tatemen Iron 
Company. With this establishment he continued until the interruptions 
of the Civil war interfered with their activities. When the war closed 
and the company was re-established, he resumed work in the furnaces. 
In 1878 he accepted the office of trustee of Stewart county and continued 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1457 

therein until 1884. In 1882 he became connected with Walter Brothers, 
-a Dover mercantile house, and remained thus associated until 1890. Since 
1896 he has been devoting his time and attention to the affairs of his 
farm property near Dover. Mrs. Charles Coppedge, who in girlhood 
was Miss Frances Josephine King, was also a native of Stewart county, 
her birthplace being in District No. 5 and the date of her birth March 9, 
1852. Her marriage to Charles Coppedge took place on November 17, 
1870. Their children were six in number: Ruby, Terese (now deceased), 
Douglas, Erie, Grace and Harold. 

Douglas K. Coppedge, third in order of birth and the eldest son of 
his parents, was born near Dover, in Stewart county, on March 29, 
1882. He gathered his knowledge of books from the public schools of 
his native community and at a comparatively early age sought a field 
for independent efforts. His first vocational venture was in the mer- 
cantile line, in the capacity of salesman in a general merchandise store 
at Bear Springs. 

The satisfactions of agricultural existence for a time appealed to Mr. 
Coppedge, who in 1901 entered upon the farming occupation, continuing 
it for nine years. In 1910 he was honored by election to the office of 
<ilerk of the court of Stewart county, a position for which he is well quali- 
fied. This office he still holds, performing its duties successfully and 
ably. He is still interested in farming to a considerable degree. 

Mr. Coppedge 's domestic life was established on June 28, 1911, at 
which time he won as his life's companion Miss Rose Thomason, a daugh- 
ter of the late Edwin Thomason of Davidson county. They are cosily 
situated at their home in Dover and are active in church and social inter- 
ests of the place. Mr. Coppedge, like his parents, has always been 
connected with the Methodist church South. Mrs. Coppedge is a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church. 

Douglas Coppedge and his father are both members of the fraternal 
order of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, in Phoenix Lodge No. 270, 
of Dover. The Modem Woodmen of America, Big Rock Camp, also 
claim the membership of D. K. Coppedge. Both he and Charles Cop- 
pedge are loyal Democrats of the characteristically southern type. 

Col. Cart F. Spence. A representative citizen of the city of Knox- 
ville and one who has had distinctive influence in connection with busi- 
ness and civic activities in this beautiful and thriving industrial center, 
Colonel Spence is now serving in the office of postmaster and is knowTi 
as one of the most loyal and . progressive citizens of this section of the 
state, where he is widely known and commands secure place in popular 
confidence and esteem. 

Cary F. Spence was bom at Knoxville, Tennessee, on the 21st of 
January, 1869, in the house wherein he now resides, and is one of the 
five children of his parents, who were Dr. John Fletcher and Elizabeth 



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1458 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

(Gary) Spence. His father was chancellor of the American University 
of Harriman, Tennessee, and chancellor of Grant University of Athens^ 
Tennessee. He was one of the best known and most highly esteemed 
men in the state. He was long identified with educational work, and wa& 
manifestly deserving of the high place that he held. 

At the inception of the Civil war he tendered his services in defense 
of the Union, and he became captain of a company in the Forty-second 
Ohio Artillery, with which command he participated in many of the 
important conflicts between the North and the South. With the. close 
of the war he established his home in Tennessee, where he continued to 
reside until his death. 

Col. Cary Fletcher Spence is indebted to the public schools of Knox- 
ville for his early educational discipline, the same having been supple- 
mented by an effective course in Grant University, in which he was gradu- 
ated in the year 1890. In the same year he received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. During his college career the young man attained 
a national prominence in athletics as a track runner, winning the one 
hundred yard and the two hundred and twenty yard dashes at the 
meet of the Amateur Athletic Union in Philadelphia in 1892. He later 
became a member of the Columbia Athletic Association of Washington, 
and in 1893, while representing that association at the World's Fair in 
Chicago, won the distinction of finishing second in the two hundred and 
twenty yard dash. 

In 1891, just following his graduation from Grant University, better 
known today as the University of Chattanooga, of which his father was 
then president, Colonel Spence entered business for the first time as a 
clerk for the Knoxville Building & Loan Company, leaving them a little 
later to associate himself with the Greer Machinery Company, with 
which he was prominently connected in the capacity of vice-president. 
He remained there for four years, withdrawing in 1898 to volunteer his 
services as a soldier in the Spanish-American war, and was appointed 
first lieutenant and regimental adjutant in the Sixth United States 
Volunteer Infantry, receiving his appointment from President McKin- 
ley, and in the following year, 1899, was promoted to the rank of cap- 
tain in Porto Rico. He has been a continuous member of the national 
guard of the state for thirteen years, and is the highest ranking officer 
in that body today, bearing the rank of colonel. Following his return to 
Knoxville in 1899, Colonel Spence became president of the Spence 
Trunk & Leather Company, a firm that has since become one of the 
substantial and prosperous concerns of the city, with a growing busi- 
ness of both a wholesale and retail order, and is president of the Island 
Home Park Company, which owns and has improved the beautiful resort 
park that gives title to the corporation and which in itself constitutes 
one of the noteworthy attractions of the Knoxville district. 

In his political activities Colonel Spence has been an enthusiastic 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1459 

supporter of the cause of the Republican party, and has been an active 
and effective worker in its ranks. On February 1, 1911, he was appointed 
postmaster of Knoxville, and in this important position he has given an 
excellent and popular administration, in which he has affected many 
improvements in the service and brought the same up to a standard 
especially high, as compared with that of other cities of the same com- 
parative population and commercial importance. Colonel Spence is dis- 
tinctively progressive and public spirited in hs civic attitude and takes a 
lively interest in all that touches the welfare and advancement of his 
native city, where his circle of friends is coincident with that of his 
acquaintances. He is one of the more active members of the Knoxville 
Board of Trade and in 1909 and 1910 served as its president, and is 
now first vice-president of the Board of Commerce of Knoxville, 
Tennessee. 

His military record has already been touched upon briefly, and it is 
unnecessary to enter into further detail concerning the same, but it may 
be mentioned that he is president of the Tennessee Sons of the Ameri- 
can Revolution ; is a member of the military order of the Loyal Legion, 
as he is also of the Military Order of Foreign Wars and the Spanish- 
American War Veterans' Association. Fraternally Colonel Spence is 
aflSliated with the Knoxville lodge of the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks, and is a member of the Cumberland, Cherokee, Country and Ap- 
palachian Clubs. All these are representative clubs of Knoxville, and 
in addition to his membership in them Colonel Spence is a member of 
the Army and Navy Club of New York City. 

Colonel Spence was married to Miss Nan Crook of Baltimore, in 
which city she was born and reared. She is the daughter of George W. 
Crook, a representative citizen of that city. Two children have come 
to the Spence family: Eleanor E. and Shirley C. 

Dr. F. a. Martin. The five years of Dr. Martin's medical practice 
in Cumberland City have been such as to demonstrate his thorough 
knowledge of his science and the high quality of his professional judg- 
ment. His family is one of those that are best known in Stewart county, 
although Dickson county was the location in which the Martins first 
settled. The first of these to locate in Tennessee was Jerry Martin 
(grandfather of the subject of this review), who came to this state 
from North Carolina. He was prominent for a number of years as a 
county official in Dickson county. His son, E. P. Martin, was bom in that 
locality, and there he received his somewhat limited education. He gave 
willing service to the cause of the South during the Civil war, in which 
he served with the rank of lieutenant, under General Forrest. When 
peace had returned to the land, E. P. Martin removed to Big Rock, where 
he engaged in mercantile and milling business, an occupation which he 
still continues, with an excellent degree of success. He is a Democrat in 



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1460 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

politics and a Baptist in church afSliation. Mrs. E. P. Martin is a native 
of Montgomery county, where in her girlhood she was known as Miss 
Irene Reynolds. Of the eight children who have been born to them 
the seventh in line was F. A. Martin. The place of his nativity was Big 
Rock, in Stewart county, and the date of his birth was February 9, 1880. 

The general education of F. A. Martin was completed in Cumberland 
City Academy. He had chosen the University of Tennessee as his pro- 
fessional alma mater and went to Nashville in order to enter that insti- 
tution. He completed his medical course in 1907 and after taking his 
degree, he settled in that same year in Cumberland City, where he at 
once began practice. Success has attended his efforts and his patronage 
is steadily increasing. He js interested in all events and in all periodi- 
cals that further the science of medicine. He is a member of the Mont- 
gomery County Medical Society and of the Tennessee State Medical 
Society. 

Dr. Martin is a man of sturdy Democratic views. His fraternal 
interests are with the organizations of the Masonic order, his member- 
ship in that society being in Charity Lodge No. 307. 

On July 11, 1911, Dr. Martin and Miss Blanche Robinson were 
united in marriage. Mrs. Martin is a daughter of the late Robert Robin- 
son, the L. & N. conductor whose life was skcrificed in the railroad 
wreck on that line. Dr. and Mrs. Martin are among Cumberland City *s 
most highly regarded and popular citizens. 

A. S. Prosseb. One of the ablest lawyers of the Knoxville bar was the 
late A. S. Prosser, a soldier of the Union army during the Civil war. 
mustered out in Tennessee, and taking up his residence at Knoxville soon 
afterwards. For many years, until his death, he was one of the leading 
attorneys, enjoyed a large private practice, was esteemed for his unfalter- 
ing observance of the best ethics of the profession and for his solid integ- 
rity in all the relations of life. 

A. S. Prosser was a Pennsylvanian by birth, born in that state Decem- 
ber 4, 1838. He was the third in a family of four sons, whose parents 
were David and Rachael (Williams) Prosser, both of whom were bom in 
Wales, were married there, and came to America in 1832, locating first 
near Harrisburg, and subsequently at Johnstown, Pennsylvania. The 
mother died in 1842, and the father subseciuently married Mariah Ken- 
ton, a native of Bedford county, Pennsylvania, and she became the 
mother of eight children. David Prosser, the father, had the distinc- 
tion of being the first man to open a coal bed in western Pennsylvania. 
He lived a long and useful life, and his death occurred in 1884. 

The late Mr. Prosser spent the first fifteen years of his life on a farm, 
and most of his earlj'' education was obtained in the public schools of 
Johnstown, Pennsylvania. He subsequently moved out to the state of 
Illinois, where he was occupied up to the breaking out of the Civil war. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1461 

Then on April 19, 1861, only a few days after the firing on Fort Sumter, 
he enlisted in the Tenth Illinois Infantry, and was in service with the 
oommissary department until 1864. At that date he was transferred to 
the Second Tennessee Cavalry of the Union army as first lieutenant. 
Lieutenant Prosser was mustered out on July 9, 1865, at Nashville,- and 
remained in that city until February, 1866. At that date he located in 
Knoxville and entered the law firm of Maynard & Washburn, one of the 
old and distinguished law firms of the city. He was subsequently 
admitted a member of the firm and the title changed to Washburn & 
Prosser, a combination which continued until January, 1870, after which 
date Mr. Prosser was engaged in practice alone until the time of his 
death, which occurred June 16, 1894. Mr. Prosser in 1869 served as attor- 
ney general pro tempore for the state of Tennessee. , 

In 1875 Mr. Prosser married Lizzie Brown, daughter of Judge George 
Brown, a native of Monroe county, Tennessee. One child was born to 
their marriage. Brown Prosser, who is now well known in the business 
circles of Knoxville as a merchandise brx)ker, with his oflBces in the Hen- 
son building. Mrs. Prosser and son reside on Rutledge Pike. 

John W. Andes. Many years have passed over the head of the Hon. 
John W. Andes, of Knoxville, Tennessee, but he is still the same 
sturdy, clear headed man that he was in the days when he was helping 
to defend the Stars and Stripes against the onrush of the Confederate 
forces. He is now a notary public and a claim and pension attorney of 
Knoxville, and is widely known in the city. The experience of many 
years of wise living have shown him the way into the hearts of men and 
the respect and affection which is accorded him comes from the personal 
friendship and warm admiration of those with whom he comes in contact. 
A southerner by birth, when the war broke out he had the necessary 
courage to stand by his convictions and fight against the breaking up of 
the Union, and this has been typical of his whole life. 

The Hon. John W. Andes was bom in Tennessee, on the 28th of May, 
1838, one of the three children of his parents, who were John and Lettie 
(Murphy) Andes. His father was a Virginian by birth and followed the 
occupation of a farmer throughout his life. John W. Andes received 
from the public schools of the state what in those days was considered an 
education but which in reality consisted principally of learning to read 
and write. Turning to the only occupation which was open to a young 
southerner in those days unless he chose to become a professional man, 
John Andes became a farmer. He continued this until the Civil war 
broke out and then enlisted in Company K of the Second Tennessee 
Cavalry as lieutenant in his company and served throughout the war, 
being discharged from the service on the 6th of July, 1865. 

He left the army to take up his old life again and turned to the only 
occupation which he had followed. He was successful as a farmer and 

Vol. V— 1 7 



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1462 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

for many years continued in this occupation. In 1901, however, he gave 
up the farm and came to Knoxville to live. Previous to this, in 1890, he 
had been appointed pension agent by the commissioner of pensions and 
has served in this capacity since that time. His oflBce is located in the 
Sedgwick block and in addition to being notary public and claim and 
pension attorney, he also is engaged in taking acknowledgments and in 
handling deeds and similar interests. 

Mr. Andes is a member of the Republican party and has served his 
party faithfully and well. He was elected a member of the state legis- 
lature in 1889 and served through 1889 and 1890. In his fraternal 
relations he is identified with Masonic Lodge No. 144 of Knoxville, Ten- 
nessee. He also belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic and to Ed 
Maynard Post No. 14. He and his family are all attendants of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

On the 27th of June, 1867, Mr. Andes was married to Miss Sarah C. 
French of Knox county, Tennessee, a daughter of Michael French. Eight 
children have been bom to Mr.. and Mrs. Andes, namely: James A.; 
Addie E., wife of W. L. Murphy ; Ulysses S., now in Philippine Islands, 
at Manila, at the head of normal school at that place ; and Belle, Frank 
A., Ethel, Ernest W., and John W., all of Knoxville, Tennessee. 

W. T. ICennerly. Beginning his career as a stenographer, one of 
the best avenues of approach to many commercial and professional activ- 
ities, then winning his degree in law, and applying a fine industry with 
his natural ability to his early practice, Mr. W. T. Kennerly has for ten 
years been one of the rising members of the Knoxville bar, and has 
attained a place with the best of his contemporaries. Mr. Kennerly is the 
present city attorney of Knoxville. 

Bom in Henry county, Tennessee, August 29, 1877, he was one of a 
family of five children whose parents were C. M. and Sarah A. (Travis) 
Kennerly. The family is of Irish lineage, and the father followed the 
occupation of farmer. The names of the paternal grandparents were 
John W. and Martha (Ross) Kennerly, and of the maternal grandpar- 
ents, Dr. Joseph H. and Eliza (Crump) Travis. 

Beginning his education in the common schools of Henry county, 
Mr. Kennerly learned stenography, and for several years used that 
accomplishment as a source of self-support and a means to a broader field 
of work. In 1901 he had completed his studies in the University of 
Tennessee and won the degree of LL. B., and has since been engaged in 
active practice. He is a member of the strong legal firm of Pickle, Turner 
& Kennerly. His election to the office of city attorney occurred Janu- 
ary 27, 1912. 

During the Spanish- American war Mr. Kennerly was first sergeant in 
Company L of the First Tennessee Infantry, and is now a member of the 
Spanish War Veterans. He was for four years chairman of the Knox 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1463 

county Democratic executive committee, and four years a member of the 
state Democratic executive committee. He is aflSliated with the Phi Kappa 
fraternity, the Masonic lodge, and the Knights of Pythias, and his church 
is the Methodist South. His marriage occurred March 15, 1906, when 
Miss Ola D. Robertson, daughter of G. C. and Emily C. Robertson, 
became his wife. They have two children, Robert T. and Warren W. 

Matthew S. McClellan. Of the old and well remembered mer- 
chants of Knoxville, one of the most prominent was the late Matthew S. 
McClellan, who for forty-five years was in business in the city and at the 
time of his death was at the head of the credit department of the well- 
known shoe firm of McMillan-Hazen Shoe Company. A successful busi- 
ness man, he displayed much public spirit in the civic affairs, and was a 
kindly and highly esteemed associate and friend. His death, which 
occurred February 2, 1912, closed a career of substantial achievement 
and good citizenship. 

One of a family of eight children bom to William and Margaret 
McClellan, the late Matthew S. McClellan was bom at PoweUs Station, 
Tennessee, January 26, 1849. He attended the public schools of his 
native county, and subsequently was a student in the University of 
Tennessee. The beginning of his practical career was coincident with 
the uplift movement in business which followed a few years after the 
close of the war, and his energy and ambition found its first important 
outlet in the mercantile line in partnership with Col. J. M. Toole. After 
this co-partnership had continued for some time he became identified with 
the Qaines Brothers in the shoe business at Knoxville, and subsequently 
became associated in the shoe business with R. S. Payne. This enter- 
prise subsequently went under the firm title of McNulty, Payne & Com- 
pany, Mr. McClellan being a partner in the enterprise, and a later reor- 
ganization resulted in the finn name of McMillan, Hazen & Company, 
probably the largest and most prosperous wholesale shoe company in 
Knoxville. Mr. McClellan was identified with this firm as one of its 
guiding spirits until his death. He was at that time secretary and treas- 
urer of the company and had given the best years of his life to the exten- 
sion of its business throughout this part of the South. 

The late Mr. McClellan was for one term an alderman representing 
the Seventh ward in the city council, and his name was frequently asso- 
ciated with the voluntary organizations of business men or citizens in 
eflfecting some important improvement in this section of the city. 

Mr. McClellan was married on October 26, 1871, to Miss Hannah E. 
Wallace, a daughter of Robert Wallace. Their children, six in number, 
are named as follows: Hugh, who is one of the well-known and pros- 
perous business men of Atlanta, Georgia ; Samuel B., in the manufactur- 
ing business ; Robert W., V. P. with the S. C. Dismukes Hat Co., at Knox- 
ville; Lula, wife of Edward C. Briscoe, one of Knoxville 's business men 



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1464 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

-and a resident of 1510 Laurel avenue; Harriet, the wife of James W. 
Young, who died September 20, 1908, and Miss Elizabeth, who resides at 
home with her mother in the old residence at 1221 Laurel avenue. The late 
Mr. MeClellan and his family were all communicants of the Southern 
Methodist church. In his home Mr. MeClellan was loved as a kind and 
generous father and husband, and among all his business associates he 
had a reputation for solid integrity which was never impeached. His 
remains now rest in the Old Gray cemetery at Knoxville. 

Capt. John M. Brooks. One of the most highly esteemed citizens 
of Knoxville is Capt. John M. Brooks, w^ho for some years has been in 
the insurance business in this city and has spent most of his life in 
Tennessee. Captain Brooks is a veteran of the Confederate army and 
won his rank as a soldier of the South. He has long been one of the 
influential men in the Democratic party and following the end of the 
war had a very important part in the reorganizing of the Democracy in 
-eastern Tennessee. He is a former mayor of the city of Knoxville and 
has given public service in many important capacities during his long 
and active career. 

John M. Brooks was one of a family of nine children, whose parents 
were Joseph A. and Margaret (McMillan) Brooks. He was bom Octo- 
ber 28, 1840, and during his youth received an excellent education, first 
in the common schools and then in the University of Tennessee, or the 
University of East Tennessee, as it was then known. With the outbreak 
of the war in 1861 he was among the first to answer to the call of duty 
to the Southland, and went into service in Company I of the Second Ten- 
nessee Cavalry. His service continued for more than four years until 
the surrender of General Johnston in North Carolina. 

The first important public service of Captain Brooks on returning 
from the war was, as has been mentioned, in the reorganization of the 
Democratic party in this state. He was then identified for many years 
with business in Knoxville, after which he went to Middlesboro, Ken- 
tucky, where he was connected with a land company of that place and 
during his residence there served in the office of mayor. On returning 
to :^noxville in 1906 he engaged in his present business, the handling of 
insurance, and his success has been far beyond his expectations. The 
captain has many friends and his character and personality have kept 
him continually in high esteem. 

Politically he is an independent Democrat. He supported Governor 
Hooper during his candidacy and has always been an active worker for 
party success. 

Captain Brooks was elected mayor of Knoxville in 1908 and gave two 
years of excellent service to the city. Since leaving the office of mayor he 
has been a member of the board of education. He is one of the most 
honored members of the Confederate Veterans of the state and that 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1465 

body has promoted him to the office of brigadier general of the veterans' 
organization. Fraternally he is a thirty-second degree Mason, and has 
membership in the Sons of the American Revolution. He and his family 
are communicants of the Presbyterian church. 

Alfred Y. Burrows. One of the leading lawyers of Knoxville, Ten- 
nessee is Alfred Y. Burrows, a native Tennesseean who has honored his 
profession and his state by the able order of his services. 

He was bom in Fayette county, Tennessee, November 30, 1869, and is 
one of the five children that came to his parents, Benjamin F. Burrows 
and Matilda A. (Young) Burrows. The father was a very prominent 
contractor of Fayette county, Tennessee, where he resided until his 
death in 1892. 

Alfred Y. first received a common school education in his native 
county and then later attended the University of Tennessee. Follow- 
ing that he completed the law course in the same institution and was 
graduated in law as a member of the class of 1899, of which he was 
president. He was admitted to the bar in 1899 and immediately there- 
after commenced his practice in Knoxville, where he has continued to the 
present. He excels as a lawyer and has long held a foremost place at the 
Knoxville bar. Mr. Burrows has offices in the Empire building. In 
political affairs he is affiliated with the Democratic party and he is now 
city attorney of Park City as well as being counsel for a number of other 
large corporations. He is prominently identified with the Masonic fra- 
ternity, being a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, a past high 
priest of the Royal Arch Masons and a past master of the Free and 
Accepted Masons and past eminent commander of Knights Templar. 

On June 2, 1891, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Burrows and 
Miss Mary E. Atkin, a daughter of Capt. J. J. Atkin, who formerly 
served the city of Knoxville as chief of police. Mr. and Mrs. Burrows 
have two children, Bessie and Frank J. The family are communicants 
of the Methodist Episcopal church South. Their residence is at 1720 
Washington avenue. Park City. 

LEONroAS D. Smith. Division counsel at Knoxville for the Southern 
Railway Company, Mr. Smith has attained one of the most important 
honors and positions of service open to the legal profession of east Ten- 
nessee. He has been connected with corporate practice of a more impor- 
tant character for many years, and has been a successful member of the 
Tennessee bar for fully a quarter of a century. 

Leonidas D. Smith was born in Sparta, Tennessee, November 25, 1866. 
His parents were William Q. and Amanda (Templeton) Smith, who had 
a family of seven children. The late William G. Smith had a prominent 
place as a member of the Tennessee bar, and was actively engaged in 



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1466 TENx\ESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

practice until his death which occurred at Sparta in 1909. His wife died 
a year later in 1910. 

The career of ]\Ir. Smith was started with a public school education, 
and he was subsequently a student in the University of Tennessee, where 
he completed his literary studies. As a preceptor for his legal studies 
he was fortunate in having Col. H. C. Snodgrass, one of the most emi- 
nent lawyers of Tennessee, who had served the state in the office of 
attorney general and was also a member of congress. Under his direc- 
tion Mr. Smith continued his studies until his admission to the bar 
in December, 1887. He at once began practice and became a member of 
the firm of Jourolman, Welcker & Smith, a partnership which enjoyed 
many distinctions and successes in the profession and existed for many 
years until dissolved on March 1, 1913. As division counsel for the 
Southern Railway Company, Mr. Smith has full occupation for all his 
professional energy, but in previous years was associated with many 
important cases in the higher courts of the state. 

Mr. Smith in 1911 and 1912 served as president of the Tennessee 
State Bar Association. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Masons and the Knights of Pythias, and is a 
Democrat in politics. His office is in the Holston National Bank building 
at Knoxville. Mr. Smith married Miss Ella Wallace, daughter of Simon 
D. Wallace, one of the prominent citizens of White county, Tennessee. 
The one child born to their union is Keilah C. Mr. Smith and family 
worship in the Christian church, and their residence is at 615 West 
Church street in Knoxville. 

Horace Van Deventeb. Now clerk of the United States District 
Court for eastern Tennessee, Mr. Van Deventer has been identified with 
the bar of this state for about twenty years, a period which has been one 
of influential achievement and varied service in public life. He is a 
veteran of the Spanish- American war, has been a member of the state 
legislature, and has associated himself with many of the movements in 
social and civic affairs which give distinction to the city of Knoxville. 

Horace Van Deventer is a native of Clinton, Iowa, where his birth 
occurred July 22, 1867, one in a family of six children, his parents were 
James Thayer and Letitia (Flournoy) Van Deventer. Few of the 
younger generation of the Tennessee bar have been more liberally edu- 
cated than Mr. Van Deventer. He attended the public schools at Clin- 
ton and from there entered the Michigan Military Academy at Orchard 
Lake, a preparatory and military school, from which he was graduated 
in 1886. He then became a student in the University of Michigan, where 
he was graduated with the degree of Ph. B. in 1890. From that univer- 
sity he took up his law studies, w^hich were pursued in probably the fore- 
most school of the time in the country, the Harvard Law School, and he 
was graduated in 1893 and received the degree of LL. B. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1467 

Since his admission to the bar Mr. Van Deventer has been an active 
member of the Knoxville bar. His record of public service began as city 
attorney for West Knoxville, a position he held during 1895-97. In the 
fifty-second general assembly of Tennessee he was a senator from Knox 
county. In 1905 he began his services as clerk of the United States Dis- 
trict Court, for the eastern district of Tennessee, and his official term 
has continued now for nearly ten years. During the Spanish- American 
war in 1898-9 he was a captain in the Sixth United States Volunteer 
Infantry under Colonel Tyson, and also held the ranks of first lieutenant 
and regimental quartermaster in the same regiment. He was with the 
regiment during the Porto Rico campaign and after his muster out 
resumed his practice in Knoxville. His law offices are located at 202 
Van Deventer building. 

Mr. Van Deventer was married April 9, 1902, to Mary Lurton Pinley. 
Mrs. Van Deventer is a daughter of the Hon. Horace H. Lurton, whose 
career as a jurist is familiar to all Tennesseeans, and who is now a mem- 
ber of the supreme court of the United States. Mrs. Van Deventer who 
has been prominent in the social circles of both the Tennessee and national 
capitals as well as in Knoxville was recently appointed by Hon T. 
Asbury Wright as president of the Woman's Board of the First National 
Conservation Exposition to be held in Knoxville in the fall of 1913. 
Mr. Van Deventer and his wife are members of the Episcopal church. 
He has membership in the Military Order of Foreign Wars, the Tennes- 
see Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, the Holland Society 
of New York, and his fraternities are the Masons, the Alpha Delta Phi, 
Peninsular Chapter, and he is a member of the Cherokee Country Club 
and the University Club of Knoxville. His residence is at 945 Temple 
avenue, Knoxville. 

Harry Samuel Hall. One of the young and progressive lawyers of 
Knoxville, with offices in the McNutt building, Mr. Hall has rapidly 
attained success and prestige since opening his practice in 1906. He has 
also important interests in local business affairs, and in the city which 
has been his lifetime home he has always occupied a high social iwsition. 

Harry Samuel Hall was }x)rn at Knoxville, July 4, 1884. There were 
four children in the family, and his parents were Isaac and Mary Ella 
(Alexander) Hall. The family is of Scotch-Irish ancestry. 

Reared in his native city and attending the local schools, Mr. Hall 
graduated from the University of Tennessee with his degree in law in 
1906, and in October of the same year was admitted to practice in all 
state and federal courts. He then became associated in practice with 
the late Judge D. D. Anderson, former judge of the circuit and criminal 
court, with offices in the McNutt building. Since the death of Judge 
Anderson he has continued to practice alone. Mr. Hall is also presi 
dent of the Hall Lumber Company of Knoxville. 



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1468 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

He has membership in the Comity and State Bar Associations, is 
affiliated with Lodge No. 234, Knights of Pythias, at Knoxville, his 
Greek letter fraternity is the Theta Lambda Phi, and he and his family 
are members of the Methodist church. Mr. Hall belonged to Company B 
of the Tennessee State Guards, in which he held the offices of second and 
first lieutenant. His other fraternal orders are the Eagles and the Red 
Men. Mr. Hall in 1910 was the Democratic nominee for the office of 
representative from Knox county and he made a strong though un- 
successful campaign. 

April 2, 1908, Mr. Hall married Miss Bessie G. Johnson, daughter 
of John W. and Fannie L. Johnson. They are the parents of two chil- 
dren, Mary Frances and Irma Eugene. The Hall residence is on 
Washington pike. 

Cornelius E. Lucky. The subject of this sketch, Cornelius E. 
Lucky, was born February 25, 1841, in the village of Jonesboro, the old- 
est town in the state, and the capitol of the short-lived state of Franklin. 
He was the sixth child in the order of birth in a family of nine chil- 
dren, he and three sisters are now living. 

Mr. Lucky was the son of Seth J. W. Lucky and Sarah Rhea Lucky, 
both of Scotch-Irish descent, Presbyterians, and connected with old fam- 
ilies, that were founders of the state of Tennessee. 

Seth J. W. Lucky was bom in Greene county, in 1799, educated in 
that county, graduated at Greeneville College, and began the practice 
of law in Jonesboro, became circuit judge in 1841, then chancellor, con- 
tinued his judicial career until his death in 1869, bdng at that time 
chancellor of the first chancery division of the state. Judge Lucky was 
always a Whig although never taking any part in party politics, was 
identified with every temperance movement of his time, and was an 
unwavering Union man during the Civil war. 

His son, the subject of this review, gained his early education in the 
schools of Jonesboro and Blountville, entered Emory & Henry College, 
Virginia, in the fall of 1860, and left there in April, 1861, the college 
closing at that time on account of the impending Civil war. 

Mr. Lucky being strong in his conviction touching the issues to be 
settled by war deemed it his duty to go with his state and so in 1862 
enlisted as a private, assisted Col. Nathan Gregg in raising a company in 
Washington county, which upon the organization of a regiment became 
Company K, in the 60th Tennessee Infantry, C. S. A. Lucky having been 
chosen orderly sergeant of Company K. This regiment, soon after its 
organization, was sent South and participated in the battles around 
and near Vicksburg, Mississippi, losing a portion of same by capture 
at the battle of Big Black river, Mississippi. 

The major part of the regiment entered Vicksburg with Pemberton's 
command and passed through that noted siege. General Pemberton, by 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1469 

surrendering on July 4th, obtained very favorable terms, as the entire 
command was paroled, allowed to return to their homes and remain 
there until duly exchanged. Mr. Lucky was with his regiment during 
this entire period, and was paroled on July 4, 1863, and returned to his 
home. 

The 60th Tennessee was not exchanged until July 1, 1864, its mem- 
bers remaining at their homes on their paroles. When said regiment 
was exchanged, Mr. Lucky re-entered the army with his command, which 
was then mounted, and served with it until the end of the war, campaign- 
ing in east Tennessee and south West Virginia. 

The regiment, or that part of it not captured at the battle of Big 
Black river, was with General Early in south West Virginia, when Gen- 
eral Lice surrendered, and thereupon it started to join General Johnson, 
in North Carolina, but when within a few miles of Greensboro, North 
Carolina, learned of General Johnson's surrender, and then the men 
and oflScers of that regiment returned to their homes, where possible, 
Mr. Lucky surrendering to the Federal' forces at Jonesboro, his home. 
He was. sent from that place to Nashville, Tennessee, where he took the 
oath of allegiance to the United States government. Mr. Lucky was a 
non-commissioned officer during his entire military service, although 
he acted as quartermaster of his regiment during the last six months of 
the war. On his return from Nashville, Mr. Lucky learned of his indict- 
ment for treason, he at once surrendered to the civil authorities, gave 
bond for his appearance, and applied for and obtained a pardon from 
President Andrew Johnson. 

After the close of the war, Mr. Lucky spent a year as a clerk in a 
business house and in a law office, the latter service being in Kiioxville, 
and in September, 1866, entered Hamilton College, Clinton, New York, 
where he spent three years, graduating with the class of 1869, being a 
C. B. K. in that class. Upon graduation he returned to Knoxville, read 
law with the Hon. Thomas A. R. Nelson, one of the most distinguished 
lawyers in the state, one of the counsel defending President Andrew 
Johnson in his impeachment trial and one of the supreme judges of the 
state. 

Mr. Lucky began the practice of the law in the city of Knoxville in the 
year 1870, just after his admission to the bar, has continuously pursued 
his profession, never seeking nor holding any public office, but always 
taking an active interest and part in all civic affairs, city, county, state 
and national, and in the moral, educational and religious movements 
of his adopted home. 

He and his law firms of Lucky & Yoe, Lucky & Sanford, Lucky, San- 
ford & Fowler and his present firm of Lucky, Andrews & Fowler have 
always commanded a lucrative practice, and have been connected with 
many of the leading cases arising in this section of the state. 

Mr. Lucky has always been deeply interested in all of the educational 



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1470 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

movements in this section — was one of the founders of the first public 
library in Knoxville, is now a trustee of the Lawson McQhee Library, a 
trustee of Tusculum College (successor to Greeneville College — ^where his 
father graduated), is a member and oflScer of the Fourth Presbyterian 
church and a member of the Fred Ault Bivouac. 

George H. Burr. In' the development of the business enterprises 
which accompanied the rehabilitation of the South after the disastrous 
effect of the Civil war one of the most prominent factors in the city of 
Knoxville was the late George H. Burr. Mr. Burr was for thirty-five 
years closely identified with the commercial life and the civic and phil- 
anthropic activities of Knoxville, and in his death, which occurred April 
29, 1902, that community lost one of its finest citizens. He was a* busi- 
ness builder and possessed the rugged strength and enterprising quali- 
ties which bring success in that line, but with this half of his character 
he also combined his finer virtues of citizenship and manhood which are 
not less essentia to the well-being of a city. 

The late George H. Burr was a native of Connecticut, born in that 
state October 15, 1829, and was directly connected with the family 
which produced Aaron Burr, the former vice-president of the United 
States, associated with Thomas Jefferson in the office of president and 
vice-president in 1800, and an eminent American whode position has 
been subject to many counter opinions, but to whom the maturer judg- 
ment of history accords a sanity and worthiness in the enterprise 
which in early years marked him as almost an enemy of his country, 
though he was really only in advance of his times. The parents of the 
late Mr. Burr were Moses and Harriet B. (Banks) Burr, both of whom 
were natives of Connecticut. Moses Burr was born in Greenfield, Fair- 
field county, Connecticut, in 1806, and the mother was bom in 1809, 
being a daughter of Thomas and Abigal (Murwin) Banks. 

George H. Burr was reared at Weston, Connecticut, and as a boy 
attained a substantial education in the public and private schools of 
that place. When a youth he learned the trade of a coach-maker, but 
after some years in that pursuit it proved too small for his large ener- 
gies and ambitions, and he sought a better field for his enterprise. With 
the close of the Civil war he was among the northern men who recog- 
nized the great opportunities existing in the new South, and accordingly 
came to Tennessee in 1867, locating at Knoxville. Here he became 
identified with the saw milling and general lumber business, and during 
the succeeding years in the century his name was one of the most promi- 
nent in association with this important industry at Knoxville. He 
occupied a leading place as a manufacturer and dealer in lumber, and 
was also connected with other local commercial affairs. As a business 
man he stood in the small group whose resources and influence were the 
most vital factors in the business community. At his death he left a 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1471 

large estate, as in part the measure of his large activities as a business 
man. 

Along with success in business he gave his energies without stint to 
every movement for the betterment of the city. He was always recog- 
nized as a friend of the poor, and gave of his means liberally, not only 
to individual places of charity but to the organized activities which 
extend their practical aid to the unfortunate. Among his characteristics 
was his love for good horses, and during the last fifteen years of his 
life, which he spent largely in retirement from active business, he was 
seen almost daily behind a pair of fine drivers. He owned several 
blooded horses, and was willing to pay a large sum for one that suited 
his pace. 

On October 15, 1853, Mr. Burr married Miss Amelia Andrews, who 
was born in Connecticut in 1830, a daughter of Jonathan and Abigal 
(Murwin) Andrews, both of whom were natives of Connecticut. Her 
father was bom in April, 1802, was a farmer by occupation, and died in 
August, 1848. Her mother was bom in 1804 and died in 1854. Mr. and 
Mrs. Burr had no children. A relative of whom he was very fond, was 
his half-brother, Lewis S. Burr, of Weston, Connecticut, a farmer of 
that state, where he was born in 1859. Mrs. Burr, since the death of her 
husband, has continued to reside at their comfortable home at 208 
Prince street in Knoxville, and is now a finely preserved old lady at the 
age of eighty-two years. 

Hon. John Baxter. Up to the time of his death, which occurred at 
Hot Springs, Arkansas, April 2, 1886, the late John Baxter was the 
accepted leader of the east Tennessee bar. Both as a lawyer, a judge and 
a citizen he was a man of many eminent qualities, and in his day was 
the peer and associate of the strongest individuals in the public and pro- 
fessional life of Tennessee. 

The late John Baxter was born in Rutherford county. North Caro- 
lina, March 5, 1819. His early life was cast in a period which was nota- 
ble for its absence of schools and other advantages and facilities which 
are now deemed essential, but which nevertheless produced through the 
channels of practical experience and close association with the strong 
men of the previous generation, many of the ablest leaders known to the 
last century. 

John Baxter had no opportunity for education except as were given 
in the '*old field schools** of the neighborhood of which he lived. For a 
short time he was a clerk in a country store, but abandoned this for the 
study of law in the office of Hon. Simpson Bobo of South Carolina, and 
he quickly showed remarkable ability and talent for the law. In the 
spring of 1857 he moved to Knoxville, and it was in that city that his 
most important professional work was done. During the Civil war he 
was loyal to the government of the United States, and was always a 



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1472 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

fearless advocate of its cause. In the constitutional convention of Ten- 
nessee in 1870 he was a delegate from Knox county, and served as one 
of the leading members of the judiciary committee. While he himself 
had been a Union man, it is worthy of note that the majority of the 
members of the convention had been supporters, if not soldiers of the 
Confederacy. During the succeeding seven years John Baxter con- 
ducted what was probably the most lucrative law practice that any one 
lawyer has ever enjoyed in east Tennessee. His ability was acknowledged 
in all the courts of the state. 

In 1877 President Hayes appointed Mr. Baxter judge of the circuit 
court of the United States for the sixth circuit, a position which he filled 
with great credit and distinction. Death finally relieved him of the 
duties and responsibilities of the judicial ofiice. As summed up in the 
various opinions of those who practiced with him and knew his character 
and ability, the distinguishing characteristic of the late Judge Baxter 
was force, and in everything he did he was independent, self-reliant and 
firm. Though sometimes apparently arbitrary and harsh in his manner, 
he was essentially just, progressive and liberal, and as already stated 
was the accepted leader of the east Tennessee bar. Without any invid- 
ious distinction, it can be asserted that John Baxter was one of the 
remarkable men of his time in Tennessee. 

Col. George W. Baxter. A son of the late Judge John Baxter, CoL 
George W. Baxter is now one of Knoxville's most prominent and well-to- 
do citizens. He chose a more active life than his father, and has served 
four years as a lieutenant of the regular army, was for many years a 
ranch owner, was prominent in the public life of the West, and for the 
past ten years has been identified with the banking and manufacturing 
interjBsts of Knoxville. 

George W. Baxter was born in the state of North Carolina, January 
7, 1855, and was brought to Knoxville as a child in 1857, when his par- 
ents moved to that city. He received his education in the University of 
the South at Sewanee, where he was a student for two years, and was 
then appointed to the United States Military Academy at West Point, 
entering as a cadet in 1873 and graduating in 1877. He was commis- 
sioned second lieutenant in the Third Regiment, United States Cavalry, 
but after serving several years resigned his commission to enter business 
life. His service had taken him into the West and he remained in the 
Western states and territories for twenty-five years. As a stockman his 
business took him from Texas to Montana, and he was one of the promi- 
nent figures in the dominant industry of the West at a time when the era 
of the free range had not yet come to an end. In 1902, Colonel Baxter 
returned to Knoxville to make it his home again, where he has since 
been engaged in the banking and cotton manufacturing business. Presi- 
dent Cleveland appointed him governor of Wyoming territory in 1886. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1473 

In 1889 he served as a member of the constitutional convention which 
drafted the constitution under which Wyoming was admitted to the 
Union. In that convention he served on the judiciary committee. 

Colonel Baxter married Miss Margaret W. McGhee, daughter of the 
distinguished citizen, Charles M. McGhee, a brief sketch of whose career 
is given elsewhere. Colonel Baxter and wife were married on January 
7, 1880, and they are the parents of five children. The family are mem- 
bers of the Episcopal church, and he is affiliated with the Masonic order. 
He is also a member of all the social and civic clubs and belongs to sev- 
eral well known clubs in New York City. He is a Democrat in politics, 
and has always upheld the principles of his party. Colonel Baxter and 
family reside in their beautiful home at 505 Locust street in Knoxville. 

Col. Charles M. McGhee. One of Knoxville 's most prominent and 
influential citizens was the late Col. Charles M. McGhee, whose death 
occurred at his home in that city on the fifth of May, 1907. Colonel Mc- 
Ghee was a railroad man, a banker and financier, and both as a business 
man and as a citizen, his relations were close and intimate with many 
undertakings that deeply concerned the substantial welfare and progress 
of his home city and state. 

Charles M. McGhee was born in Monroe county, Tennessee, January 
23, 1828, one of a family of three children, bom to John and Betsy (Me- 
Clung) McGhee. His father before him was almost equally prominent 
as a business man and financier, and held extensive landed possessions 
in Monroe county. The late Colonel McGhee spent his boyhood days on 
the home plantation, and attended schools in Monroe county. He later 
graduated from the State University, and then engaged in the banking 
business at Knoxville. Colonel McGhee for many years was especially 
identified with the east Tennessee, Virginia and Georgia Railroads, now 
a part of the Southern System. He was one of the principal stockholders, 
was vice-president and general manager and took an active part in the 
development and promotion of this railroad. His varied interests called 
him much out of the state and from his home city, but he always con- 
sidered Knoxville his civic and family residence, although in his latter 
years much of his time was spent in New York City. 

Colonel McGhee was for many years a trustee of the State University 
of Tennessee, and it was largely due to his work and influence that this 
institution was reopened so soon after the war. He served with distinc- 
tion as a member of the legislature during 1870-71. 

Colonel McGhee first married Miss Isabella M. White, daughter of 
Hugh M. White. Her father was a nephew of Hugh Lawson White, 
one of the distinguished men of Tennessee. The only child of this mar- 
riage died in infancy, and Mrs. McGhee passed away in 1848. Colonel 
McGhee then married a sister of his first wife. Miss Cornelia H. White. 
The children of this marriage are noted as follows : Margaret W., wife 



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1474 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

of Col. George W. Baxter, above mentioned ; May Lawson McGhee, now 
deceased, wife of D. S. Williams; Anna, now deceased, wife of C. M. 
McClung; Bettie H., wife of Col. L. D. Tyson, one of the leading mem- 
bers of the Knoxville bar, and one of the largest coal operators of east 
Tennessee ; Elinor W., wife of James C. Neely, of Memphis. 

The city of Knoxville has a permanent memorial of the liberality of 
Colonel McGhee in the beautiful Lawson McGhee Library which stands 
as a monument to his daughter, May Lawson, and which was built and 
furnished at a cost of over forty thousand dollars. Though this was the 
most conspicuous of his benefactions in his home city. Colonel McGhee 
during his lifetime was always a friend and generous helper in the move- 
ments for a better and finer city, and his career was one that left its 
impress in many ways in east Tennessee. 

John J. Craig. During the past seventy years the city of Knoxville 
has had no name better kno^Ti or honored in general commercial affairs 
than that of John J. Craig, a name which has been borne by the head of 
three successive generations. In early years the name was associated 
with banking affairs in Knoxville, and subsequently the first bearer of 
the name became a pioneer in the marble. business of the eastern part of 
the state, and it is with the production and distribution of the finer varie- 
ties of Tennessee marble that the Craig family has been best known now 
for many years. 

John J. Craig, the first of the name in these three generations, was 
bom in Lauderdale county, Alabama, in 1820 and came to ICnoxville in 
1839. He was for several years a clerk with the well-known firm of those 
days, McClung, Wallace & Company, and in 1844 returned to Alabama. 
In 1847 he married a Miss Lyon of Knox county, Tennessee. In 1852 
he removed from Alabama and became cashier of the Knoxville branch 
of the Union Bank, a position which he filled until the bank was closed 
by the war. For two years during the war period he resided with his 
family in Cincinnati, and subsequently was engaged in the banking busi- 
ness in New York City up to 1869. He then returned to Knox county 
and resided on the old homestead in this vicinity until that place was 
sold to the state as the location for the present insane asylum, five miles 
below Knoxville. This John J. Craig was one of the pioneers in the 
production of the east Tennessee marbles and brought into the market 
the fine variegated varieties. 

John J. Craig, second of the name, for many years identified with 
business affairs in Knoxville, died at his home in this city in October, 
1903. He was a man of exceptional power and ability as a business 
man and as a citizen. He founded the John J. Craig Company, pro- 
ducers and wholesale dealers in Tennessee marble, and built up the busi- 
ness until it was among the largest of its kind in the South. John J. 
Craig was bom in Knox county, Tennessee, September 20, 1860, and was 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1475 

forty-five years of age at the time of his death. He was a student in the 
State University, and subsequently graduated in 1879 at the Queen City 
Commercial College. His business career began as a clerk with the 
Canton Banking & Insurance Company at Canton, Mississippi, where he 
remained until December 9, 1880. He was then connected with the 
banking house of John S. Horner & Son at Helena, Arkansas, as book- 
keeper until January, 1886. At that date he came to E^noxville and 
engaged in the marble trade, and gave his best ener^es to the buildinsr 
up of the business which now bears his name. In 1883 he married Miss 
Lucy Cage, who was bom in Canton, Mississippi. 

The late John J. Craig was known and esteemed by hundreds of the 
leading business men and citizens of Knoxville, and he left behind him 
only the memories which are associated with a good man and an indus- 
trious and public spirited citizen. His widow and family reside at 1415 
Highland avenue. At his death his body was interred at the Old Gray 
cemetery, where it now rests. 

The son of this late well known citizen, John J. Craig, is now secre- 
tary and treasurer of the John J. Craig Company. The offices of the 
company are in the Holston National Bank building. Mr. Craig is one 
of the prominent young business leaders of Knoxville. 

Joe Leon Hughett'. The law firm of Hughett & Hughett, with offices 
in the Holston National Bank building at Knoxville, is in several ways 
distinctive among the legal firms of this state. The senior member of 
this firm is Mrs. J. L. Hughett, who was born in Scott county, Tennessee, 
a daughter of Hon. Laban Riseden, one of the prominent attorneys of 
that section of the state. Mrs. Hughett received a liberal education and 
studied for the law, and a few years ago was admitted to practice in all 
state courts and the Federal court. It is said that she was the first 
woman in the South to be admitted to practice in the Federal courts. 
Another noteworthy feature about this firm is that about two years ago 
it was on Mrs. Hughett 's motion that her husband and law partner was 
admitted to practice in the supreme court of Tennessee. This was the 
first time in the history of that court that a lawyer was admitted to prac- 
tice upon the motion of a woman. As a successful law firm none stands 
higher in the Knoxville bar than that of Hughett & Hughett and the 
partners have enjoyed a clientage of the highest class and have attained 
much success in the profession. 

Joe Leon Hughett was bom in Huntsville, Scott county, Tennessee, 
December 1, 1883, and was one of a family of five children whose parents 
were Calvin Hughett and wife. His father, was a farmer in Scott county 
As a boy he attended the public schools of his native county, and later 
completed his education in the University of Tennessee, of which he is a 
graduate. On August 14, 1910, he married Miss Riseden, who, as already 
gtated. was bom in the same county, but entered the practice of law 



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1476 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

somewhat in advance of her husband. ]\Lr. Ilughett is affiliated with the 
Junior Order of United American Mechanics and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. Jn politics he is a Republican. 

Charles H. Smith. Now assistant division counsel for the Southern 
Railway Company and representing other large foreign and domestic 
corporations, Mr. Smith has in less than ten years attained a place in the 
ranks of the leading attorneys of Knoxville, and his varied and success- 
ful experience in the profession has laid a foundation for many larger 
honors and achievements in the coming years. 

Charles Henry Smith was born in the city of Knoxville, Knox coxmty, 
Tennessee, on the 'ird day of December, 1881, and was the oldest of a 
family of four children born to Benjamin Franklin and Mary Bogart 
Smith. His mother was a native of Loudon county, Tennessee, and his 
father was a native of Campbell county, Tennessee, but since 1880 had 
made his home and engaged in business in the city of Knoxville, where 
he was recognized as one of the leading merchants and most influential 
citizens up to the time of his death, which occurred on the 20th day of 
August, 1900. 

As a boy Charles H. Smith attended the Knoxville public schools and 
later completed his studies in the University of Tennessee, where he 
graduated in 1902 with the degree of Bachelor of Arts and in 1903 with 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws. During the years 1902-1903 he taught 
school in the public schools in Knoxville, pursuing his study of law in the 
night class conducted at the University of Tennessee. In June, 1903, he 
was admitted to the bar in Knoxville, but before beginning the active 
practice of his profession he taught school another year, being principal 
during 1903-1904 of the school conducted at Albemarle, Louisiana. 

In July, 1904, Mr. Smith returned to Knoxville and began the active 
practice of law, in which profession he has since been engaged continu- 
ously. He was first associated with the law firm of Sansom & Welcker, 
but in 1905 he formed the law firm of Young & Smith, his partner being 
Mr. Robert S. Young. Only a few months later, and in the year 1905, a 
partnership was formed with Judge H. B. Lindsay, and the firm then 
became Lindsay, Young & Smith, and remained so until 1909, when Mr. 
W. J. Donaldson became a member of the firm, which continued until 
1911 under the firm name of Lindsay, Young, Smith & Donaldson. In 
August, 1911, Mr. Smith withdrew from this firm and has since been 
engaged in the practice of his profession alone, having a suite of offices 
at present in the Holston National Bank building. 

In 1908 Mr. Smith was elected secretary and treasurer of the Bar 
Association of Tennessee, to which position he has been unanimously 
re-elected each succeeding year, and is at present still occupying this 
position. Since 1905 Mr. Smith has been connected with the Southern 
Railway Company as its local counsel for Knox county, and on March 1, 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1477 

1913, he was appointed assistant division counsel for the Southern Rail- 
way Company with headquarters at Knoxville, and having charge of the 
company's legal business in Blount, Loudon, McMinn and Monroe coun- 
ties. He also represents several large and influential foreign and domes- 
tic corporations, and in addition has an extensive general practice. He is 
personally interested in several corporations, among which is the Knox- 
ville Savings Bank, of which institution he is a stockholder and director, 
and is also attorney for this bank. 

On the 6th day of November, 1907, Mr. Smith was married to Miss 
Maude Keller, a daughter of Thomas W. and Laura Lackey Keller. To 
them one child has been born, a boy who bears the name of his father, 
Charles Henry Smith, Jr. Mr. Smith and his family are members of the 
First Cumberland Presbyterian church of Knoxville. He is a Republican 
and is a member of the Cumberland Club, Cherokee Country Club, Amer- 
ican Bar Association, and the Bar Association of Tennessee. 

Mr. Smith and his family occupy their beautiful home at 1704 West 
Clinch avenue on the summit of Fort Sanders, where the historic battle 
of Fort Sanders was fought. 

James Isaac Vance, D. D. LL. D. Though the pastoral service of 
Dr. Vance has been confined to three or four of the larger congrega- 
tions of the Presbyterian denomination in the South and East, his name 
and influence as a preacher, church builder, writer and lecturer are as 
well known as those of any minister of the South. His talents and his 
devotion to his profession have brought him into the largest field of 
efficient Christianity, and his services and career are notable. 

James Isaac Vance was bom in Arcadia, Tennessee, September 25, 
1862, a son of Charles Robertson and Margaret (Newland) Vance. I>r. 
Vance is a brother of Joseph Anderson Vance, also prominent in the 
Presbyterian church, and now pastor of the First Church of Detroit. 
Dr. Vance represents some of the oldest families of the South. His 
father was a soldier in the Confederate army at the time of the son's 
birth, and the mother had left her residence in Bristol and was a refugee 
at her father's home in Arcadia. 

The great-grandfather, William Vance, was a resident first at Lex- 
ington, Virginia, and then at Jonesboro, Tennessee, and married Kezia 
Robertson, a sister of Maj. Charles Robertson, who was one of the men 
appointed to make a treaty of peace with the five Indian tribes. A 
younger brother of Major Charles was Gen. James Robertson, founder 
of Nashville, Tennessee. The first member of the Vance family in Amer- 
ica was Dr. Patrick Vance from the north of Ireland and a graduate in 
medicine from the University of Edinburgh. He was a physician in 
Pennsylvania prior to the Revolutionary war. Some of his descendants 
moved south along the valley of Virginia to North Carolina and Tennes- 
see. The paternal grandfather of Dr. Vance married Jane Sevier, a 

Vol V— 1 8 



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1478 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

daughter of Valentine Sevier, and a granddaughter of Col. Bobert 
Sevier, the latter having been the only officer on the American side to be 
killed in the battle of King's Mountain. Colonel Bobert was the younger 
brother of John Sevier, who was Tennessee's first governor. Dr. Vance 
is thus descended from the early settlers of Watauga, and the founders 
of the state of Tennessee. 

On his mother's side, Dr. Vance is descended from the Andersons 
and Rheas, strong Scotch-Irish families which have given a large number 
of ministers to the Presbyterian church in America. The maternal 
grandfather was Joseph Newland, who married Rebecca Anderson a 
daughter of Isaac and Margaret (Rhea) Anderson. An earlier member 
of the Rhea family was Joseph Rhea, who was one of the first Pres- 
byterian ministers to come from Scotland to America. To the 
careful religious training of his mother. Dr. Vance attributes the influ- 
ence which impelled him to enter the ministry. He was educated at 
King College in Tennessee, where he graduated A. B. in 1883, and 
received his master's degree in 1886. It was his intention to enter the 
medical profession and his course in college was taken with a view to 
that end. Soon after his graduation, however, his purpose was changed, 
acnd in 1883 he entered the Union Theological Seminary of Virginia, at 
Hampden-Sidney, where he was graduated in 1886. Dr. Vance was made 
Doctor of Divinity by King College in 1896, and by Hampden-Sidney 
in the same year. In 1913, King College conferred on him the degree of 
Doctor of Laws. 

Ordained in the Presbyterian church in 1886, his first pastoral charge 
was at Wytheville, Virginia, where he remained during 1886-7, and was 
then at the Second Presbyterian church in Alexandria from 1887 to 1891. 
During his pastorate of four years at Alexandria, a new church building 
was erected, and he was instrumental in uniting the northern and south- 
em branches of the church in that city, the northern society uniting with 
the southern, and thus making one prosperous congregation. The church 
was thoroughly organized and its membership substantially increased. 

On October 1, 1891, Dr. Vance took charge of the First Presbyterian 
church of Norfolk, Virginia, where he remained until 1894, and where 
his pastorate was marked by great prosperity and power. At the end 
of three and a half years he resigned to accept a larger field, and on 
February 1, 1895, became pastor of the First Presbyterian church of 
Nashville, the largest single congregation of the Presbyterian church in 
the United States, and the largest and wealthiest church in the city of 
Nashville. In 1900 Dr. Vance left Nashville to take charge of the North 
Reformed church at Newark, New Jersey, where he remained ten years. 
Under his ministry this congregation had a rapid development, and when 
he left it, it was the largest church in the Dutch Reformed denomination. 
He then returned to Nashville, where he has been pastor of the First 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1479 

church since December 1, 1910, and where he preaches to congregations 
which crowd his big church to overflowing. 

As a platform lecturer Dr. Vance is known throughout America, 
and he has been only less popularly known a^ an author, his contribu- 
tions being both of a religious and moral character. He is the author of 
^'The Young Man Four-Square, " 1894; '< Church Portals,'' 1895; ** Col- 
lege of Apostles," 1896; *' Predestination," a pamphlet, 1898; ** Royal 
Manhood," 1899; *'Rise of a Soul," 1902; *' Simplicity in Life," 1903; 
^^A Young Man's Make-Up," 1904; ''The Eternal in Man," 1907; ''Ten- 
dency," 1910. Besides these he has been a frequent contributor to mag- 
azines and reviews. Dr. Vance is one of the best orators of the South, 
his powers consisting in his simple and earnest method of presenting his 
convictions and his concise and forceful language. On December 22, 
1886, Dr. Vance married Mamie Stiles Currell of Yorkville, South Caro- 
lina, a daughter of William and Agnes (Wilkie) Currell. The children 
of Dr. Vance and wife are as follows : Margaret, William Currell, Agnes 
Wilkie, Ruth Armstrong, James Isaac (deceased), and Charles Rob- 
ertson. 

Dr. Vance is recognized as one of the religious leaders of the country, 
and his influence is not confined to denominational lines. No man is 
more in demand as a college preacher, and his work has made a profound 
impression on students. He has made the leading address on many 
notable occasions of a religious and educational character. The ** Brief 
Statement of Belief" issued by the Presbyterian church in the United 
States was the result of his leadership and much of it was composed by 
him. In his views he is a progressive conservative. He has declined fre- 
quent invitations to the presidency of colleges, and to the pastorates of 
leading churches in the largest cities of America. 

H. A. Davis. Superintendent of the Nashville Railway & Light 
Company, Mr. Davis is one of the prominent railway and construction 
engineers of the South, and has been identified with a number of large 
ponsultation corporations in various states. He began his career in New 
York state as a stationary engineer and his natural ability and devotion 
to the profession which he had taken as a vocation have brought him into 
prominence. Mr. Davis was bom in Oswego, Oswego county, New York, 
April 3, 1866, a son of Samuel A. and Esther (Parks) Davis, both of 
whom were natives of Oswego county, the former bom there in 1838 and 
the mother in 1845. The mother now resides with her son H. A. at 
Nashville. The Davis family came originally from Wales, and was 
founded in this country by the great-grandfather, Abijah Davis. The 
paternal grandparents were H. M. and Mary A. (Wilson) Davis, both 
natives of Vermont, and the former being a prosperous farmer who 
moved to New York state after his marriage and spent the balance of 
his life in Oswego county. The maternal grandfather was Nathaniel 



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1480 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSHANS 

Parks, who married a Miss Holly. Nathaniel Parks was a native of New 
York state and a carpenter by trade. The Holly family were very prom- 
inent in both New York and Michigan. Samuel A. Davis was a farmer 
but also followed the profession of engineer and millwright, and pros- 
pered in all his undertakings. He and his wife represented different 
religious faiths, he being a member of the Adventist church and his 
wife a Methodist. In politics he was a Republican. There were three 
children in the family, two of them are now living, and the son, George 
BL Davis, is a mechanical engineer in New Orleans. 

Hiram A. Davis attained most of his early education in a countiy 
and high school at Oswego, New York, and was little more than a boy 
when he began learning all there was to the trade of stationary engineer. 
When he was nineteen he married Miss Isa May Outwater, a daughter of 
William H. Outwater. H«r father, who was bom and reared in New 
York, was one of the most prominent men of Niagara county and known 
not only as a pioneer fruit grower in that section, but also as a leader in 
the temperance cause. It is said that he did more for the promotion of 
temperance than any other individual in the county. He did much to 
promote fruit growing on a commercial basis and was influential in 
many ways in his community. Mr. and Mrs. Davis have two children. 
Lucy Eudelpha is the wife of Warren A. Holstead, the latter being 
superintendent of Qlendale Park in Nashville. Lloyd E. is now attend- 
ing school, living at home with his parents in Nashville. Mr. and Mrs. 
Davis worship in the Baptist church and he is affiliated with Masonry 
in the Scottish Rite Consistory and the Mystic Shrine. In politics he 
is independent. 

After his early career as a stationary engineer in New York he was 
given charge of a power house at Long Island City, that being at the 
time one of the largest power houses for the generation of electricity in 
the entire country. After this experience he accepted a place as super- 
intendent of equipment on the New Orleans & Carrolton Railway in 
New Orleans. He had practical management of the entire mechanical 
department of the road and continued there for five years, being pro- 
moted to the place of manager before the road was sold. Mr. Davis came 
to Nashville on December 5, 1902, his mission here being to construct the 
power house for the electric light and power system. During this work 
he was taken sick and was confined in a hospital for one year. On 
recovering he was given the position of superintendent of the Nashville 
Railway & Light Company, and now has charge of that important local 
corporation. 

WiLLTAM N. Holmes, M. D. An ex-president of the Tennessee State 
Medical Society and a practitioner of thirty -five years' standing, Dr. 
Holmes would be conceded by both the profession and laity a foremost 
place in ability and success in the field of general medicine as well as in 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1481 

surgery, in which his special forte lies. Besides his professional promi- 
nence, Dr. Holmes has a place in Tennessee history, due to the more than 
a century residence of the Holmes family in the state, and its varied 
relations with the substantial welfare of both state and nation. 

William N. Hohnes was born in west Tennessee at a little town named 
Holmes, January 27, 1854. The history of the family in America begins 
with John Holmes, who came to America with Oglethorpe about the 
middle of the eighteenth century. By profession he was a civil engineer 
and helped that philanthropic colonizer to lay out the city of Savannah, 
Georgia, and he died while living in Georgia colony. This civil engineer 
was in the fifth generation from Dr. Holmes. The next in line was James 
Holmes, who reached the rank of colonel in the Revolutionary army and 
settled in North Carolina, where he remained until his death. 

After James Holmes came John Holmes, grandfather of Dr. Holmes, 
who was one of the early settlers in west Tennessee, and it is said that 
he did more to civilize that country than any other early pioneer. He 
was owner of large landed estates and possessed a large amount of 
wealth for his day. He died in February, 1851, having been bom Jan- 
uary 30, 1777. He came to Tennessee in 1806. 

The parents of Dr. Holmes were John R. and Eliza Day (IVCeAlexan- 
der) Holmes. The latter was born in Virginia in 1815, and died in 1872, 
and was a daughter of James McAlexander, a native of Virginia, who 
brought his family to Tennessee in 1838, locating in western Tennessee, 
where he was one of the big farmers of his time. His father came from 
Ireland in 1770 and became a large and wealthy planter of Virginia, 
and gave patriotic service to the colonies during the Revolutionary war, 
John R. Holmes was born in Bedford county, Tennessee, in 1815, and 
died April 21, 1884. He was reared on a farm and when five years of age 
moved out to west Tennessee, where his father had taken up a large tract 
of land. He spent the rest of his life in that portion of the state. He 
and his wife were the parents of eight children, among whom the doctor 
was the seventh, and is now the only one living. The father and mother 
were members of the Presbyterian church, in which he was an elder and 
a very active worker. In politics he was a Democrat. 

William N. Holmes received his education in the common schools in 
west Tennessee, and later took his collegiate course at Waynesburg,. 
Pennsylvania, where he was graduated in 1877. He began to study 
medicine in 1878, taking his first course of lectures in Cincinnati in 1879. 
He spent eight years in practice as a non-graduate, returning to Cincin- 
nati, and graduating M. D. in 1888. He was in practice at Clarksbursr, 
Tennessee, for three years, after which he returned to his private farm, 
which he bought and improved and during his residence there practiced 
for six years. His next location was at Milan, Tennessee, where he wasr 
engaged in practice for thirteen years, and in 1901 moved to Nashville. 
Since then he has been in active practice in this city, and enjoys a very 



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1482 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

large and high class patronage. Though his practice is general, he is 
especially well known as a skillful surgeon. He performs his operations 
in different hospitals of the city, and has never been known to lose a case 
in surgery. 

Dr. Holmes was married in 1880 to Margaret E. Learned, a daughter 
of E. B. Learned of Dresden, Tennessee, a prosperous tobacco manufac- 
turer of that city. The six children born to the doctor and wife are 
mentioned as follows: Margaret M., who is a teacher of expression in 
Martin College at Pulaski; John L., a resident of Phoenix, Arizona 
William J., also in Phoenix, where he is in the real estate business 
Lysander P., an assistant health physician in the city of New York 
Sue Day, a graduate of the Ward Seminary, and now living at home 
and William N., Jr., in school in Nashville. The family worship in the 
Presbyterian church. Dr. Holmes belongs to all the medical societies 
and associations, and for four terms has been chosen president of the 
Tennessee State Medical Society. He is aflSliated with Masonry and 
with the Knights of Pythias, and is a Democrat in politics. He is pros- 
perous, and holds a high rank in the citizenship of Nashville, and it is 
an interesting fact that at the beginning of his career he had to acquire 
his own education and taught school for a number of terms in order to 
pay his way. 

Leland Hume. To start as a roustabout employe of a grocery house 
at two dollars a week and eventually rise to the place of vice-president 
of one of the largest public utility corporations in the South, is an 
achievement demanding exceptional qualities of individual character. 
It is not the melodramatic success of Wall street nor of the western gold 
field. There is something solid, genuine and unimpeachable about such 
a performance. It begets confidence and admiration. On the way up 
from the lowly start to the goal there is no place for blundering ineffi- 
ciency or vacillating decision ; anyone with a casual knowledge of Amer- 
ican industrialism is sure that no weakling could get far in such a race. 
The following modest sketch is perhaps the more effective because the 
details of this advancement are only suggested. 

Bom in 1864, Leland Hume spent his childhood in the city, and when 
a boy attained his first regular employment as roustabout for the Orr 
Brothers' grocery store at the nominal wage of two dollars a week. There 
he trained for the larger career which was being nursed in his ambition. 
Some years later he became identified with the Cumberland Telephone 
Company, and has been in the telephone business ever since, being now 
vice-president of the Cumberland Telephone Company. When he first 
went into the business it was a very small and largely local concern, but 
since then has grown to a corporation with an investment of thirty-two 
million dollars. Mr. Hume started in the telephone business with 
three associates, each of whom is a powerful figure in financial life of 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1483 

Tennessee. The first was James E. Caldwell, president of the Fourth 
and the First National Banks. Another was T. D. Webb, vice-president 
of the Fourth and First National Banks, and the third was John W. 
Hunter, assistant comptroller of the state of Tennessee. 

Mr. Hume acquired his education, and has depended upon his own 
resources ever since he entered business. He went through the public 
schools of Nashville, and later attended Vanderbilt University. Mr. 
Hume married Miss Marie Louise Trenholm, a daughter of Dr. George 
A. Trenholm of Charleston, South Carolina. He and his wife are the 
parents of three children, namely : Alfred, William and Georgia. 

Mr. Hume is a director in the Tennessee Bank & Trust Company 
and in the Cumberland Telephone Company; is active in the Sons of 
Confederate Veterans; and is president of the Tennessee Sons of the 
American Revolution. He was the first president of the Nashville Board 
of Trade and one of i(& present directors, and is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club, the Golf Club and the Country Club. He has membership 
in the board of education and is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias. 

Amos L. Edwards. Now engaged in the land business and in coloni- 
zation work on a large scale, with offices in Nashville, Mr. Edwards first 
gained a place as one of the successful educators of Tennessee. Thirty- 
five years old, his career has been one of exceptional activity and suc- 
cessful enterprise. 

Amos L. Edwards was born in Weakley county, Tennessee, August 
19, 1878, a son of William A. and Elizabeth (Howell) Edwards. Grand- 
father William A. Edwards was bom in North Carolina, came to Ten- 
nessee in 1835, locating in Dickson county, where he spent his career as 
a farmer. The maternal grandfather, Jasper Howell, was a Virginian 
by birth, coming to Tennessee in an early day, and following the pur- 
suits of agriculture. William A. Edwards, the father, was bom in 
Dickson county in 1838, and died in 1909. His wife, who was born in 
Weakley county in 1850, now resides on the old homestead. The father 
had his early education in Dickson county, and moved with his parents 
to Weakley county when he was fifteen years of age. He was known as 
a substantial farmer, he and his family were members of the Cumberland 
Presbjrterian church, and he was affiliated with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. In politics he was a Republican, and served as magis- 
trate and on the school board, and other minor offices. There were six 
children in the family, four of whom are living : Matilda, who married 
J. W. Pope, a farmer of Weakley county ; John A., who lives on a farm 
in Weakley county ; Amos L. ; and B. D., who is a farmer in Weakley 
county. 

Amos L. Edwards, outside of his common school training in Weakley 
county, is largely self-educated, having paid his own way through col- 
lege and university. He attended the McFerrin College at Martin, Ten- 



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1484 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

nessee, and in 1905 was graduated from Vanderbilt University. For 
several years he was actively identified with educational work. He had 
charge of the Howard Female College in Gallatin for two years, and for 
a time was head of the American University at Harriman, Tennessee, also 
for one year being head master of the Cumberland City Academy. He 
continued as a teacher until 3910, at which time he engaged in the timber 
land business, establishing an oiBce in the Stallman building at Nash- 
ville. He sells land all over the South, and has conducted several suc- 
cessful colonization enterprises in different directions. Mr. Edwards is 
the owner of a Louisiana plantation, and also a farm in west Tennessee. 
In 1905 he married Miss Vetress Ramer, a daughter of Dr. D. W. 
Ramer, who has been for many years a leading physician of Robertson 
county. Mr. Edwards is a member of the Baptist church, is aflSliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modem Woodmen 
of America, and was a charter member of the Vanderbilt chapter of the 
Phi Kappa Sigma. He has gone through all the chairs in the Modern 
Woodmen and filled all the offices in the lodge of the Odd Fellows except 
that of Noble Grand. In politics he is an independent Republican. 

Lewis Kemp Grigsby. As secretary-treasurer and general manager 
of the Lebanon Cooperative Medicine Company, Lewis Kemp Grigsby 
has made rapid strides on the way to financial independence, and occu- 
pies a place of no little prominence in Lebanon, not because of his 
business success aJone, but because of his many excellent qualities of 
heart and mind and his sterling citizenship as well. He is the represen- 
tative of two of the oldest southern families extant, and his family, on 
the paternal and maternal sides, have borne distinguished parts in the 
making of history from colonial days down to the present time. 

Bom in Winchester, Clark county, Kentucky, on August 30, 1875, 
Lewis Kemp Grigsby is the son of J. V. and Mary C. (Robinson) 
Grigsby, both of whom were born and reared in Clark county, that 
state, which has represented the home of the family for many genera- 
tions. The father was born there in 3826 and died in 1908, at the fine 
old age of eighty-two. He was long identified with the extensive farming 
industries of his state, and in later life came to Wilson county, 
Tennessee, when he introduced short-horn cattle into the county for the 
first time in the history of the state. The date of his settlement here 
was in 1887, and Tennessee represented his home from then until the 
time of his death. He was a son of Lewis Kemp Grigsby, born in Clark 
county, Kentucky, where he spent his entire life. The mother, Mary C. 
Robinson, was a daughter of Thomas H. Robinson, who was born in 
Jefferson county, Kentucky, and there spent all his life. He at one 
time owned an immense body of land in the state of Louisiana and 
when he died had an estate valued at $90,000. J. V. and Mary Grigsby 
became the parents of six children, of which number three are living 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1485 

today, and of that number L. K. was the youngest bom. They were 
members of the Christian church, and were known for fine and stanch 
members of the community that knew them, and when they died were 
mourned by a large circle of friends. 

Until Lewis Kemp Grigsby was twenty-one years old he lived on the 
home farm, attending school in the nearby schools meantime, and later 
graduating from the commercial department of the Cumberland Univer- 
sity. When the Spanish-American war came on he enlisted in the 
First Tennessee Volunteer Infantry and served for nineteen months 
with his regiment. After the war and his return to his home community, 
he engaged in the mercantile business in which he continued until 1904, 
then came to Lebanon and became identified with the drug business. 
He continued thus until 1912, at which time he organized the Lebanon 
Cooperative Medicine Company, and engaged in the manufacture of liver 
medicines. The product of this concern finds a ready market 
throughout the southern states, and the plant is steadily increasing its 
output to meet the ever-increasing demands of the trade. It is predicted 
that this concern will soon take rank with the largest patent medicine 
establishments in the south. In the management of the plant, Mr. 
Grigsby has displayed unusual business acumen, and has incontrovertibly 
proven himself to be possessed of exceptional merit as a business man. 

In addition to his interest in this enterprise, Mr. Grigsby has acquired 
ownership of some four hundred and fifty acres of cotton land in 
Mississippi, with business houses in Birmingham, where he is extensively 
interested as a stockholder in one of the more important banking in- 
stitutions of that city. He also has banking interests in Watertown, 
Tennessee, and is a director in the Cedar Croft Sanitarium, Lebanon, 
Tennessee. He ha^ interested himself in oil stock and other investments 
of a like nature in Texas, and is financially interested in the Union Bank 
& Trust Company of Lebanon, Tennessee; he is also secretary and 
treasurer and a controlling stockholder in the Cherokee Glove Manu- 
facturing Company of Lebanon, Tennessee. 

Mr. Grigsby is a member of the Christian church, in which his par- 
ents reared him, and he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, in which 
he is past chancellor and master of the exchequer, and is now a trustee 
of the order as well. He is president of the Lebanon Business Men's 
Association and a director of the Lebanon National Bank. As a Demo- 
crat, he has always taken an active part in the labors of the party, but 
has never aspired to public oflBce. 

On July 4, 1907, Mr. Grigsby married Miss Lizzie Wheeler, the 
daughter of Dr. Thomas C. Wheeler, a physician of Wilson county for 
years. He was long a prominent Mason of the county, and was a veteran 
of the Civil war, serving in the Sixteenth Tennessee Regiment as sur- 
geon throughout the long period of hostilities. He saw much of the 
horrors of war, and himself was wounded at Perryville, and was cap- 



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1486 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

tured and held as a prisoner of war in Bock Island prison for some 
months. He died in 1909, and was known to be one of the wealthy 
men of the community at the time of his demise. He was the son of 
Nathaniel Wheeler, who served in the Indian wars, and the grandson of 
another Nathaniel Wheeler, who gave valiant service to the cause of the 
colonies in the Revolutionary war. 

To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Grigsby two children have been bom — 
Mamie Gates and Bessie Kelton. 

Thomas Nbal Ivby. In 1910 at the General Conference of the Meth- 
odist Church South, Thomas Neal Ivey was chosen to the position of edi- 
tor of the Christicm Advocate at Nashville, the official organ of the 
Church. Mr. Ivey is one of the ablest men of the Church South, has given 
seventeen years of his life to editorial labors, and has been in the min- 
istry since 1888. Thomas Neal Ivey was born at Marion, South Carolina, 
May 22, 1860, a son of Rev. G. W. and Selina R. (Neal) Ivey. The 
family origin is traced back to Ireland, from which country, about the 
middle of the eighteenth century, two brothers came to American soil, 
landing at Norfolk, Virginia, whence from those two ancestors the large 
membership of the present family of Ivey in America is descended. The 
grandparents of Mr. Ivey were Benjamin and Elizabeth (Shankle) 
Ivey, both of whom were born in North Carolina, the former being a 
farmer and spending all his career in his native state. He lived during 
the Revolutionary period of the colonies and gave service to the Ameri- 
can cause as a soldier. The maternal grandparents were James and 
Elizabeth (Moore) Neal, who were also natives of North Carolina, the 
former having been a successful merchant. The Neal family also came 
from Ireland. 

Rev. G. W. Ivey, the father, was born in North Carolina in 1828, and 
died in 1902. His wife was born in 1830 and is now living at States- 
ville, North Carolina, at the age of eighty-three. The father had a com- 
mon school education, and when a young man took up the work of the 
ministry, which he followed for fifty-three years. He preached in North 
and South Carolina, and held charges at Lenoir, Morganton, Newton, 
Statesville, Clinton and Leasburg. He possessed along with his strong 
faculties of heart and mind and a thorough devotion to the church a 
number of quaint characteristics. He was very witty, and was very 
popular among his people and his advice was as acceptable in secular 
affairs as in religion. He would go to church to preach in any kind of 
i«sreather and attended his duties strictly whether anyone else followed 
him or not. He and his wife were the parents of nine children, six of 
whom are still living. The father was a Democrat and belonged to the 
Masonic order. 

Thomas Neal Ivey received his collegiate education at Trinity Col- 
lege in North Carolina, where he was graduated A. B. in 1880, and A. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1487 

^I. in 1882. In 1896 the degree of D. D. was conferred upon him. His 
early career was spent in teaching. He was principal of the Shelby high 
school in North Carolina from 1880 to 1883, and principal of the Oak 
Institute at Mooresville, North Carolina, from 1883 to 1888. Successful 
though he was as a teacher, his ambition was to follow in his father's 
profession, and having carried on his theological studies, he entered the 
active work of the ministry in 1888. Ehiring the succeeding years he was 
pastor of several charges, at Lenoir Station, North Carolina, in 1888; 
Boxboro, North Carolina, from 1888 to 1892, and Wilson, North Carolina, 
from 1892 to 1896. His career as an editor began with the North Caro- 
lina Christian Advocate^ published at Greensboro, with which paper he 
remained from 1896 to 1898, and was then editor from 1898 to 1910 of 
the Raleigh Christian Advocate. As already stated he was chosen editor 
of the Christian Advocate at Nashville, the general organ of the church, 
in May, 1910. His relations with the church have been many. He was 
a member of the last four quadrennial Gteneral Conferences, a delegate 
to the Ecumenical Conference at Toronto in 1911, vice-president of 
Southern Methodism of the Federal Council of the Church of Christ in 
America. He was a trustee of Trinity College, North Carolina, of the 
Methodist Orphanage at Raleigh, and a member of the National Edito- 
rial Association. He is a Democrat in politics, and an active Mason, 
having been grand chaplain of the Grand Lodge of North Carolina for 
two years. He belongs to the Kappa Sigma fraternity, his home Chapter 
being the Eta Chapter at Trinity College. Since 1896 Mr. Ivey has been 
editor of the Southern Methodist Handbook, the annual year book of the 
Methodist Church South. He is author of *'Bildad Akers: His Book." 
Mr. Ivey was married in North Carolina August 8, 1883, to Miss 
Lenora Ann Dowd, a daughter of James C. Dowd, a North Carolina 
farmer. The four children of their marriage are : Mrs. Sam P. Norris, 
of Raleigh, North Carolina ; Ruth C, at home ; Neal D., of New Orleans, 
and Margaret P., in school in Virginia. 

John Lewis Kirby, of the Book Editors' Department of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church South, was born, reared and educated in the city 
of Nashville. He is the only son of John Moody Kirby, a native of 
Wilson county, Tennessee, but from his twelfth year a resident of Nash- 
ville. The father died when the son was less than eleven years of age, 
and before finishing his fourth year at the Academy of Gossett & Webb, 
the lad found it to be imperative that he should fit himself to aid in the 
maintenance of his mother and five young sisters. He chose the printer's 
art, of which he readily acquired an expert knowledge under the able 
tutelage of the well remembered Anson Nelson and others. During his 
apprenticeship, which endured for five years, the opportunity for pur- 
suing his academic studies was eagerly improved, and his interest in an 
active literary life began to develop. 



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1488 TENNESSEE AND TENls^ESSEANS 

While yet a lad in his teens Mr. Kirby frequently did reporting and 
other writing for his alma mater, the Nashville Gazette, and his first real 
venture into journalism proper was with Col. Thomas Boyers, as co- 
editor and publisher of the Gallatin Examiner, in 1860 and 1861. Phys- 
ical disability prevented Mr. Kirby from entering the Confederate 
army, and for the first three years of the war he was connected as' writer 
and business partner with the Patriot, the Press, and the Dispatch, of 
which William Hy Smith, Edwin Paschal and John Miller McKee were 
the respective editors-in-chief. These war-time journals within the camp 
of the enemy obviously gave the news from the contending armies with 
very meager comment. A noteworthy feat of the young ** local'' at this 
time was his report of Andrew Johnson's public address as military 
governor of Tennessee, in March, 1862 — considered to be among the most 
important speeches of his life. It was heard by a throng of anxious 
people that packed the hall of representatives to overflowing, and the 
verbatim report of Mr. Kirby — the only one made — ^filled two pages of 
the Patriot. Four or five years later he was with President Johnson 
and his cabinet in the famous ** swing around the circle" and reported 
the speeches, etc., for the Louisville Journal, Still later, when Mr. John- 
son retired from the presidency, they happened to meet at QfiUatin, 
Tennessee, where Mr. Johnson made an address, and of this the journal- 
ist sent telegraphic accounts to the Courier Journal, 

When the war ended, Mr. Kirby went to Louisville on a visit and 
was there unexpectedly called to the chief local editorship of the Jour- 
nal. This position he held on the Journal and on the Courier Journal, 
in association with George D. Prentice, Paul R. Shipman, Henry Watter- 
son, John E. Hatcher and others, from 1865 to near 1870. In the latter 
year, his health being seriously impaired, he returned to Tennessee. 
After two years devoted chiefly to the recovery of his health, and declin- 
ing all offers to resume newspaper life, he entered the service of the 
Methodist Publishing House, first as general proof -editor, then assistant 
Sunday school editor with Dr. W. 6. E. Cunnyngham, until 1895, and 
from that year to the present time assistant editor of books and the 
Quarterly Review, with the late Bishop John J. Tigert and the present 
editor, Gross Alexander, D. D. Within this long period of time the 
books edited were many hundreds in number, and the periodicals many 
thousands — a vast library, indeed, of church, Sunday school and gen- 
eral literature of the highest value. The work of Mr. Kirby has had an 
undeniable uplifting effect upon the reading community at large, and 
the results have been of a wider reaching nature than might have been 
possible had he continued in newspaper circles and work. 

John F. Joyner. The cashier of the Broadway National Bank at 
Nashville, Mr. Joyner possesses the business qualities which dominate 
the policy of the big institution with which he is connected — energy 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1489 

and progressiveness. Of the type of man who is architect of his own 
fortunes, his promotions and achievements in the world of finance have 
advanced him well to the front rank before reaching the meridian of his 
career. John F. Joyner is a native Tennesseean bom in Sumner county, 
November 13, 1875, a son of John W. and Veleria L. (Bowers) Joyner. 
His grandparents were Robert and Martha (Hargraves) Joyner, both 
Virginians by birth, where they were married and came to Sumner 
county, Tennessee, at an early date. The grandfather was a very wealthy 
man, owning between two and three hundred negroes, and some five or 
six thousand acres of land. He reared a family of five children, and his 
death occurred before the Civil war. The maternal grandfather was 
William T. Bowers, who was bom and reared in Davidson county, belong- 
ing to a family of early settlers in this county, and he was a well-to-do 
man and gained a generous prosperity before his death, which occurred 
when he was still young. Of the four children in the Bowers family, two 
of the sons went to California early in life and of these T. J. Bowers 
was eminent as an attorney and at one time served as chief justice of 
Idaho. 

John W. Joyner, the father, was born in Sumner county, Tennessee, 
in 1833, and died in 1888. His wife was bom in Davidson county, in 
1838, and died in 1910. Th father was a Sumner county farmer, raised 
considerable stock, and was very prosperous. There were eight children 
born to himself and wife, of whom seven are living. The family worship 
at the Cumberland Presbyterian church,^ and John W. Joyner was a 
very enthusiastic member of the Masonic lodge, of which he was a mas- 
ter a number of times. He was a Democrat in politics, and though he 
held no office he was always generous in supporting his friends and 
worked for the general success of the party. During the war he was 
one of the strong supporters of the Southern cause, and was put in 
prison because of his refusal to take the oath of allegiance. Two of his 
brothers. Dr. J. H. Joyner and W. H. Joyner, were both soldiers in the 
war, W. H. having organized a company and serving as captain and 
major. 

John F. Joyner while a boy attended the public schools of Davidson 
county, and later was graduated from the Jennings Business College in 
1896. He began his career as clerk in a general store at Qoodlettsville. 
While in that store he employed all his leisure time in the study of law, 
and was admitted to the bar. He then went West and was connected 
with a law oflBce in Durango, Colorado. On returning to Tennessee, he 
became assistant cashier of the bank of Qoodlettsville, with which insti- 
tution he remained seven years. He was the active executive of this 
bank throughout the time, and managed and directed all its business 
during the seven years. In 1905 Mr. Joyner organized the bank of 
Greenbrier, and was its cashier for seven years. Then in 1912 he came 
to Nashville to take the ofiice of cashier of the Broadway National Bank, 



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1490 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

one of the strongest financial institutions in the state. The Broadway 
National has a capital stock of two hundred thousand dollars, resources 
of a million and three quarters and the average deposits run well 
upwards of a million and a half. The business of the bank is rapidly 
increasing and during the past two years its deposits have grown by 
eight hundred thousand in the aggregate. The principal oflScers are 
Julian S. Cooley, chairman of the boai'd ; A. E. Potter, president j J. H. 
Bradford, vice-president; and John F. Joyner, cashier. 

Mr. Joyner was married in 1902 to Miss Sadie Cunningham, of 
Goodlettsville, Tennessee. Her father was a merchant and farmer of 
Goodlettsville, having been in the mercantile business there for thirty- 
five, years. During the war he fought for four years as a Confederate 
soldier. Mr. and Mrs. Joyner have one child, Sarah, now nine years of 
age. Their church is the Methodist South, and he is affiliated with the 
Masonic lodge, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics, but has never been a candidate for office. He acquired 
his education through his own efforts, and is regarded as one of the 
prosperous men of Nashville. He is a stockholder in the Broadway 
National Bank, and also a stockholder and director in the Bank of 
Greenbrier. 

James H. Yeaman. One of Tennessee's leading architects, Mr. Yea- 
man has followed his profession with offices in Nashville for the past 
quarter century. Examples of his work can be pointed out in many of 
the larger public and semi-public edifices as well as in residences all 
over the city and in various parts of the county. He was also building 
contractor for a number of years. 

His family is one of the oldest in Tennessee. His great-grandfather 
was John Yeaman, who came from Scotland in an early day, locating in 
Spottsylvania county, Virginia, near Danville. He was the father of 
four sons, two of whom moved to Tennessee, one being Grandfather 
Yeaman, and both dying a few years after they located in this state. 
The two other brothers went to Ohio, and from them members of the 
name spread to the states of Indiana and Missouri. 

A son of the first settler was Grandfather Joseph Yeaman, who mar- 
ried Mary Shelton. Both were bom in Virginia, moved to Tennessee in 
early days, locating in Smith county, where Joseph Yeaman died in a 
few years after his settlement. He and his wife reared a family of seven 
children, all of whom are now deceased but one. 

The parents of the Nashville architect were William J. and Emma 
(Cooper) Yeaman. The father was born in Virginia in 1835, and died 
in 1901. The mother was bom in Putnam county, Tennessee, in 1845, 
and is still living. Her father was John C. Cooper, a minister of the 
Cumberland Presbyterian church, and served as a chaplain during the 
Civil war. He contracted pneumonia from exposure and died soon nfter 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1491 

the close of the war. The Cooper family were from England, and the 
family of Rhoda Patton, wife of John C. Cooper, were from Ireland, and 
came over the mountains into Tennessee about the same time with the 
Yeamans. William J. Yeaman, the father, was a carpenter and cabinet 
maker, and came to Tennessee when a young man with his father. His 
education was obtained in Virginia. He reared a large family of ten 
children and gave them all good educations, and eight of them are now 
living. The father was a member of the Methodist church South, and 
his wife was a Cumberland Presbyterian. He was a quiet Christian 
gentleman, supported the Democratic party, but was not active in poli- 
tics. Several uncles of James H. Yeaman on both his father's and 
mother's side were soldiers in the Civil war. 

James H. Yeaman was bom in Jackson county, Tennessee, at Gran- 
ville, September 3, 1859, was educated at New Middleton in Smith county 
in what was known as the New Middleton Male and Female Institute, 
an academic institution well known in its time and having succeeded the 
old Clinton College of ante-bellum days. The academy had pupils in at- 
tendance from every state in the Union. Mr. Yeaman started out in life 
as a carpenter, and from that practical trade worked himself into his 
higher position. He devoted himself steadily to acquiring the art of 
architect, and has practiced that profession more or less regularly for 
the past thirty years. He opened an office as architect and builder in 
1887, but in 1905 gave up the building and contracting end altogether 
and has since enjoyed a large patronage as an architect alone. 

Mr. Yeaman was married in 1882 to Mollie Dandridge, of Nashville, 
a daughter of Edward Dandridge, who was a Virginian by birth, and 
who came to Lebanon, Tennessee, when a young man. The Dandridge 
family were related to George Washington 's wife. Mr. and Mrs. Yeaman 
have one child, Mary Emma, who is a graduate of the Peabody Normal 
School. The family are members of the Methodist church South, and he 
is affiliated with Claiborne Lodge of the Masons, and he has filled all 
the chairs except master, and is a chapter and Knights Templar Mason 
as well. He also belongs to the Knights of Pythias. In politics he is 
Democratic. 

Tony Sudekum deserves the title of a successful young business 
man. His enterprise enabled him to start on the proverbial nothing, 
and in a few years become the head of half a dozen companies with an 
aggregate capital of several hundred thousand dollars, and supplying 
service and commodities not to the occasional but to the daily wants 
of many thousands of people. 

Tony Sudekum was bom in Nashville, August 21, 1880. His par- 
ents were Henry and Sarah (Eggensperger) Sudekum. The father was 
a native of Pittsburgh, and the mother of Nashville. The grandpar- 
ents were bom in Europe but spent their last years in Nashville. The 



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1492 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

father came to Nashville when a child, and was a baker by trade. For 
some time he worked as a journeyman in that occupation, and then 
engaged in business for himself in east Nashville, where he remained 
for twenty-five yeai*s, his plant being located on Cherry and Mulberry 
streets. He had nothing to start on, but did well financially, and is now 
living retired. He had little advantages of education, but mastered 
the fundamentals necessary for a business career, and did well by his 
children. He and his wife had seven children, all of whom are living, 
Tony being the oldest. His parents are members of the German Luth- 
eran church, and the father is affiliated with Masonry, being a Knight 
Templar and a member of Claiborn Lodge. In politics he is a Demo- 
crat. 

Tony Sudekum, as a boy, attended the Howard School at Nashville, 
and began his practical career in his father's bakery. He has always 
continued in the bakery business, although his varied interests in other 
fields have in recent years occupied much of his time. His actual start 
on the road to prosperity and in the larger fields of business occurred in 
1905 when he established in Nashville a moving picture show. Since 
then he has built up and extended his interests in this line, and has 
incorporated the Crescent Amusement Company, and now controls the 
Elite, the Alhambra, the Fifth Avenue, and the Princess theaters in 
Nashville, and in other towns of the state he is owner and has the con- 
trolling interest in ten other amusement houses. The capital stock 
of the Crescent Company is one hundred and fifteen thousand dollars. 
He is also owner of the Princess Amusement Company, with a capital 
stock of sixty-five thousand doUars. Mr. Sudekum is president and 
general manager of these companies and they all are directly the result 
of his keen foresight and business enterprise since he had no capital 
to speak of when he started eight years ago. Mr. Sudekum is a very busy 
man, giving all his time to his bakery, and to his other enterprises. He 
has large interests in the Union Ice Cream Company of Nashville, and is 
president of the New Southern Milk Condensing Company of Nash- 
ville, Illinois, where the company has a large plant and ships its products 
throughout the southern states. 

Mr. Sudekum was married in 1904 to Miss Nettie E. Fesler, a daugh- 
ter of John Fesler, and a native of Nashville. Her father is a market 
gardener in this city. Mr. and Mrs. Sudekum have four children, 
namely: Viola, in school; Elizabeth, in school; Marie and Sarah. The 
family are communicants of the Lutheran church, and Mr. Sudekum is 
affiliated with the Corinthian Lodge of ^lasons, the Woodmen of the 
World, the Golden Cross, and the Junior Order of United American 
]\Iechanics. Politically he is a Democrat. 

D. M. Smith. Publishing agent for the publishing house of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church South, at Nashville, Mr. Smith has charge of this 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1493^ 

important position in one of the largest publishing firms in the United 
States since 1890. He has been connected with the business since 1888, 
going in as business manager of the Nashville house, and in 1890 was 
elected by the general conference at St. Louis as one of the two publishing 
agents, and has acted in that capacity since that date. The business of 
the Southern Methodist Publishing House has a scope and volume seldom 
realized, and its publications go from Canada to Brazil and from Norfolk 
to China. Mr. Smith is a man of self-attainment, having begun as a 
poor boy and having entered business life as a bookkeeper and office man. 

D. M. Smith was born at Knoxville, Tennessee, October 14, 1854, a 
son of J. R. and Thurza (Young) Smith. The parents moved to the 
vicinity of Knoxville early in life, where the father was a farmer and 
where he remained until 1858, when he joined his brother in Arkansas, 
and made that state his home during the rest of his life. He was a man 
of moderate means, had a quiet, unassuming character, though he main- 
tained very decided views on moral and general questions. He was of 
Scotch-Irish descent. The parents had five children, only two of whom 
are living. Mr. Smith's elder brother, Robert Park Smith, is now in the 
grocery business in San Angelo, Texas. The parents were members of 
the Presbyterian church, and the father was a Democrat in politics. 
He served as captain of a state militia company for a while in Knoxville. 

D. M. Smith had his education in private schools and was gradu- 
ated in 1874 from the Bryant & Stratton Business College at Nash- 
ville. Thus equipped for a business career he began as bookkeeper, and 
followed general clerical work for twelve years, and all in the employ of 
one firm. He then went with the Southern Methodist Publishing House, 
as already stated, and his ability as a business getter and in managing 
the extensive affairs of the publishing house, has caused him to be 
retained in one of the most responsible business positions in connection 
with the entire church. 

In 1879 Mr. Smith married Miss Virginia Cunnyngham, a daughter 
of Dr. W. G. E. Cunnyngham, who was a noted minister of the Metho- 
dist church. He was sent as a missionary to China in 1854, remained 
in the East for ten years, engaged in pastoral work until 1875, and then 
spent the rest of his life in the publishing house of the Southern Metho- 
dist church. For nineteen years he was editor of the Sunday school 
department of the publishing house. The six children born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith are David M., a graduate of Vanderbilt University, and 
now a student in the University of Chicago; Robert Young, assistant 
manager in the advertising department of the publishing house; Wil- 
liam C, in school; Jessie and Mildred, both at home; and Virginia^ in 
school. The family are all members of the Methodist church South, and 
Mr. Smith is a Democrat in politics. 

Vol. V— 10 



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1494 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Wabd-Belmont — Ira Landbith. On June 1, 1913, occurred the 
formal consolidation of the Ward Seminary and Belmont College, the 
former being the oldest and the latter the largest of Nashville's famous 
boarding schools for young women, this event being regarded as one 
of the most important and far-reaching in its results of any step which 
has been taken in Tennessee educational history within recent years. 
The actual negotiations and business arrangements which brought about 
this consolidation were concluded early in the year 1913. The full 
designation of the new school is '^Ward-Belmont, uniting and continuing 
Ward Seminary for Young Ladies, founded by William E. Ward, D. D., 
1865, and Belmont College for Young Women, founded by Miss Ida E. 
Hood and Miss Susan L. Heron, 1890.'' The president of Ward-Bel- 
mont is Rev. Dr. Ira Landrith, who for eight years was regent and presi^ 
dent of Belmont, and for the year preceding the consolidation president 
of Ward. 

Ward Seminary, the older of the two institutions, was founded in 
1865 by the late William E. Ward, D. D. It has enjoyed a very influ- 
ential career and has educated a great many of the most prominent 
women of the present and previous generations. Thousands of its 
former students live in this city, the attendance from Nashville alone 
exceeding three hundred annually. This fact in itself is regarded as 
the highest possible testimony to the work of the institution, particu- 
larly since among these are the daughters of leading educators, clergy- 
men, and numerous other citizens of the highest culture who esteem a 
school for the educational methods it employs and the ideals to which 
it clings. For twenty years Dr. and Mrs. J. D. Blanton had charge of 
Ward, Dr. Blanton as the president and Mrs. Blanton as principal of the 
home department, and the strong hold they have on the public confidence 
and the devotion to them on the part of the faculty and student body 
not only kept the school prosperous in spite of the discouragement of a 
down-town location, but so bound to them the families of patrons that 
the boarding population at Ward the last year was nearly half composed 
of daughters from homes that had formerly patronized Ward Seminary. 
Dr. Blanton 's wisdom in the administration has been equaled by Mrs. 
Blanton 's fine, strong and beautiful influence in home-making for the 
girls. 

Belmont College, though younger than Ward Seminary, in its board- 
ing department was more than twice as large, while the day patronage at 
Ward was always several times larger than Belmont's day school. Thus 
they practically balanced each other in numbers. Miss Ida E. Hood and 
Miss Susan L. Heron, school girl friends, are said to have covenanted 
in their own student days to unite one day in founding a school for 
girls, and Belmont was the fulfillment of that dream. Beginning with 
the beautiful old Acklen mansion, ** Belmont" in September, 1890, they 
year after year had a boarding attendance to the full capacity, during 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1495 

1912-13 reaching its highest point, about 375. From time to time, as 
needed, additions were made to the buildings, equipment and faculty, 
until Belmont became nationally famous as a home school for girls and 
young women. Belmont always stood for the highest things in character 
and womanhood, and for earnestness and integrity in training and study. 
Daughters from representative homes in more than thirty states have 
been attending annually for many years, every state but four having 
been represented in its history. 

Ward-Belmont had its location on Belmont Hill, and in addition to 
using the ten buildings of Belmont College, plans and preparations have 
already been completed for the erection on the campus of two other 
very handsome halls, one for administration and academic uses and the 
other as a residence for one hundred girls and teachers. The consolida- 
tion of these schools, it should be noted, is the result of the outright pur- 
chase of both schools by a new corporation composed of twelve^ gentle- 
men, ten of whom had never had any financial interest in either Ward 
or Belmont. Both schools, therefore, entered the union upon the same 
terms and basis. Concerning this consolidation and its advantages, one 
of the local papers said editorially: *'It was a source of gratification that 
neither had absorbed the other, but that the name of each will be per- 
petuated in the new title of Ward-Belmont. Nashville is proud of both 
institutions, and of their fame abroad. They have added most materially 
to its right to be known as the Athens of the South. By the consolidation 
the management will be able to accomplish results unattainable singly. 
Two schools of first rank have combined to make one of double lustre. 
Instead of a division of energy in advertising the two institutions, which 
might leave a doubt in the mind of the prospective patron as to which 
school to send the girl to be educated, with perhaps a chance for another 
school in another city to score, the consolidated college will draw with 
irresistible force from a wide territory." 

Rev. Dr. Ira Landrith, clergyman, and president of Ward-Belmont, 
was born near Milford, Ellis county, Texas, March 23, 1865. His par- 
ents were Martin Luther and Mary M. (Groves) Landrith, of Scotch- 
Irish stock. During his youth he attained his education in the public 
schools, and then was a student in Trinity University of Texas, and 
later in the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tennessee, where he 
was graduated in 1888. During the following year he continued a stu- 
dent at Lebanon and was graduated in the law department. The degrees 
conferred upon this well known Tennessee educator were B. S. in 1888, 
LL. B. in 1889, LL. D. in 1903 and D. D. in 1904. 

Dr. Landrith has spent nearly all his career in educational work, 
and has enjoyed numerous honors and distinctions in the educational 
and religious world apart from his most satisfying achievements as head 
of the two great woman 's colleges which have been recently consolidated 
largely through his own influence and active efforts. He is an ordained 



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1496 TENx\ESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

minister of the Presbyterian church in the U. S. A., and in 1903-04 was 
general secretary of the Religious Education Association at Chicago. 
He was general secretary of the Presbyterian Brotherhood of America 
in 1908-09 and was editorial secretary of the Presbyterian Brotherhood 
in 1909-1910. He was moderator of the last General Assembly 
of the Cumberland Presbyterian church before its union with the 
Presbyterian church. From 1890 to 1903 he was editor of the Cumber- 
land Presbyterian. In June, 1912, after eight years as president of Bel- 
mont College, he resigned and became president of Ward Seminary. 
Dr. Landrith was married in 1890 to Miss Harriet G. Grannis. He is 
aflfiliated with the Knights Templar in Masonry and with the Knights 
of Pythias. 

Alfred A. Adams. This prominent lawyer and business man of 
Lebanon and leader in the public life of Wilson county is one of the 
foremosl and forceful men of Tennessee. Early he set for himself high 
and worthy aims in life and how earnestly and successfully he has 
endeavored to live up to them is shown in the progress of his career. 

Alfred Armstrong Adams was born in Wilson county, Tennessee, 
April 9, 1865. Alfred A. Adams, his father, bom in Davidson county, 
this state, in 1840, was educated for the profession of medicine but never 
became a practitioner, taking up instead the business of a druggist at 
Nashville and following that line of endeavor during his brief business 
career. He was remarkably successful and in a very few years of busi- 
ness activity he accumulated considerable wealth. At the opening of the 
war between the states he took service in Company E (Buchanan's com- 
pany) of the First Tennessee Cavalry (Wheeler's regiment) by enlist- 
ment at Donelson, Tennessee, on February 23, 1861, and remained in the 
service until discharged at Quntown, Mississippi, on August 29, 1862, on 
account of wounds received in battle. He never fully recovered from those 
wounds and from that time until his death in 1867, at the age of twenty- 
seven, was practically an invalid. He wedded Margaret J. Gleaves, who was 
bom in Wilson county, Tennessee, in 1843, and is yet living, a resident 
of Lebanon. She is a daughter of Guy Trigg Gleaves, formerly of Mt. 
Juliet, who was a native of Tennessee and who resided near the Hermi- 
tage in Davidson county, and she is a granddaughter of Absalom Gleayes, 
an immigrant to this state from Virginia. Alfred A. Adams, son of Rich- 
ard Kane Adams, the paternal grandfather of the subject of this review, 
was a native of Pennsylvania, bom in the city of Carlisle, Cumberland 
county, th^t state, and came to Tennessee in 1813, locating at Nashville. 
He was an architect and civil engineer by profession, and was one of the 
argonauts that sought the gold fields of California in 1849, but he 
remained there only a short time and then returned to Tennessee, where 
he passed away in 1854 from cholera. He was a prominent member of 
the Masonic fraternity in this state, was a member of Cumberland Lodge 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1497 

of Masons at Nashville and was grand treasurer of the Masonic order in 
Tennessee from 1828 to 1849. Two sons came to the union of Alfred A. 
and Margaret (Qleaves) Adams: Alfred A., Jr., and Edward E. 

Alfred A. Adams, our immediate subject, acquired his earlier edu- 
cation in the public schools of Wilson and Davidson counties and grad- 
uated from the Montgomery Bell Academy in Nashville in 1884, as val- 
edictorian of his class. Following his graduation he entered the govern- 
ment service in the auditing department at "Washington, D. C, where 
he remained eight years and during that time pursued the study of law in 
Georgetown University and in (Columbian, now George Washington, 
University in that city. He was admitted to the bar in 1891 in the 
District of Ck)lumbia and entered upon the practice of law in 1897 in 
Lebanon, Tennessee, where his ability soon placed him in the front rank 
of attorneys, admitted to practice in fill the courts, and where as years 
have passed he has become one of the eminent citizens of the community 
and widely known in politics as a stanch and influential supporter of 
Democratic policies. The bar has always seemed a stepping stone to 
political preferment under our American system. It was not long until 
Mr. Adams' aptitude for public business was discovered, and in 1901 he 
was elected to the popular branch of the state legislature as the represent- 
ative of Wilson county. The state still had further need of his services and 
in 1903 and again in 1911 he represented his district, Wilson and Smith 
counties, in the state senate. As a legislator he was liberal, high-minded 
and discreet and took a broad and intelligent view of all public ques- 
tions. He was also a constructive legislator and his achievements in that 
connection have been of an important nature. As chairman of the peni- 
tentiary committee during his service as state senator he secured the 
passage of a number of laws for the benefit of prisoners and he was 
the author of the ** Adams law'' that put saloons out of all the counties 
in Tennessee except four. He is not only an able lawyer and a forceful 
man in public life, but his keen business instincts have made him a man 
of large and substantial properties, and as a citizen he is of the pro- 
gressive stamp, alive to every local interest which looks to renewed in- 
dustry in his community and state. Mr. Adams was one of the original 
stockholders and is now vice-president and a director of the American 
National Bank of Lebanon, organized in 1900, which has a capital of 
$50,000, surplus and profits of $20,000 and deposits averaging $350,000. 
He also owns a good farm and is interested in live stock. Mr. Adams is 
distinctly a self-made man and has builded in life out of the resources 
of his own genius and abilities. He is prominently affiliated with the 
Masonic fraternity in this state as a Scottish Rite Mason, a member of 
the Knights Templar and of the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. He represented the Middle Tennessee Shriners at 
the national meeting of Shriners at Los Angeles in 1912, and he is called 
the father of Al Menah Temple at Nashville by reason of his having led 



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1498 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

in securing its establishment. He lias been treasurer and trustee of his 
commandery of Knights Templar for twelve years and has been a trustee 
of his Masonic lodge eight years. He also sustains membership in the 
Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is a 
past chancellor commander of the Knights of Pythias and has been a 
trustee of his local lodge of that order for eight years. 

The marriage of Mr. Adams took place in Washington, D. C, in 
1889, and united him to Miss Mary Dove Albright of that city. Mrs. 
Adams is a daughter of Thomas Jefferson Albright, a native of Lancaster, 
Pennsylvania, who served as secretary and confidential clerk of Presi- 
dent James Buchanan and for a while as commissioner of the general 
land oflftce in the Department of the Interior. Mrs. Adams is a member 
of the Keformed church, while Mr. Adams is identified with the Pres- 
byterian denomination. 

WiLLUM RoscoE Moore, a young physician who has but recently 
located in Tennessee as a medical practitioner at Allen's Creek, Lewis 
county, has made a thorough preparation for his life work by a full col- 
leriate education and complete medical training, including a year of 
hospital work. Tennessee is well favored in the number of men of 
attainments that are to be found in its professional ranks and ever ex- 
tends a hearty welcome to the young man of ambition and character, and 
such a one Dr. Moore has proved to be. 

He was born April 18, 1885, in Colbert county, Alabama, a son of 
Dr. Riley Jackson Moore, who was for many years a practitioner at 
Riverton, Alabama. After completing his literary studies in the Ala- 
bama State Normal School at Florence he entered the Memphis Hospital 
Medical College for his professional training and was graduated in 1908 
with the degree of M. D. Following his graduation he served one year 
as a hospital interne to add practical experience to his preparation and 
then he returned to his home town of Riverton, Alabama, where he prac- 
ticed one year. From there he came to Allen's Creek, Tennessee, as 
physician for the Bon Air Coal & Iron Company, which relation he yet 
sustains, being also a general practitioner in the village and immediate 
vicinity. He is a Democrat in political allegiance 'and his fraternal 
associations are as a member of Overton Lodge. No. 652, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, and of White Oak Camp of the Woodmen of the World. 
Dr. Moore was married in 1909 to Miss Cecelia Hastings, of Sheffield, 
Alabama. 

Dr. Moore springs from an old family of Alabama, he being a repre- 
sentative of the third generation native to its soil. Dr. Riley Jackson 
Moore, his father, was bom in Alabama in 1851 and passed away in that 
state in 1908. He wedded Dina B. Terry, who was born in Alabama in 
1863 and is yet living, a resident of her native state. To the union of 
these parents were bom nine children, of whom Dr. William R. Moore 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1499 

is fourth in order of birth. Dr. Kiiey Jackson Moore was educated at 
the University of Louisville for the profession of medicine and spent his 
whole career as a practitioner at Biverton, Alabama. He was a Demo- 
crat in political views, a member of the Baptist church, and in line with 
his profession he was affiliated with the American Medical Association. 

Caesar Thomas. One of the most prosperous business men of Wilson 
county is Caesar Thomas, who about twenty years ago located at Water- 
town and opened an office for insurance. The enterprise and energy 
which he has directed into this business h£is had very fortunate results, 
and although he started out in life with nothing, and has had to acquire 
everything by dint of his own labors and energies he is now enjoying a 
place among the most influential and prosperous citizens of this county. 

Caesar Thomas was born at Statesville, Tennessee, March 1, 1868, a 
son of Samuel Newton and Drusilla (Sneed) Thomas. The paternal 
grandfather was James Thomas, a native of North Carolina, who came to 
Tennessee during the early days and became a settler in Wilson county, 
where he combined his profession as a minister of the Presbyterian 
church with the occupation of farmer. The Thomas family is of Welsh 
descent and has been long represented in America. The maternal grand- 
father was John Sneed, who was born in Wilson county of parents who 
had been among the earliest settlers here, and he spent all his life in the 
county as a farmer and one of the well known citizens. 

Samuel N. Thomas, the father, was bom in Wilson county in 1820, 
and died in 1896. His wife, also a native of this county, was bom in 1830 
and died in 1895. Farming was the occupation which he followed, with 
more than usual success, throughout his active career. His civil life was 
interrupted twice by war, and he served in the Mexican conflict during 
the forties, and subsequently on the Confederate side during the Civil 
war. He was afiiliated with the Masonic order, was a Democrat in poli- 
tics, and a member of the Presbyterian church, while his wife was a 
Missionary Baptist. There were four children in the family, and of 
these James T. lives at Qulfport, Mississippi, while Woods T. is a resident 
of Batesville, Arkansas. 

Caesar Thomas spent only the first fifteen years of his life on the 
paternal homestead, and during that time he had only meager advantages 
in the way of schools. At the age of fifteen he ran away from home, and 
from that time on had to depend on his own efforts to gain a livelihood, 
and to advance himself into higher places of business activities. On 
leaving home, at the early age mentioned, he located on the Mississippi 
gulf coast, where he began to work for himself. He lived there for some 
years, and it was there he met his wife. He was married in 1892 to 
Miss Dasie Cropper of Woodville, Mississippi, whose father was Nathan- 
iel Cropper of Woodville, Mississippi. The three children bom to Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas are as follows: Reid N., who is a graduate of the 



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1500 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

Columbia Military Academy, and is now associated in business with his 
father ; Cornelia, at home, she having been born in 1897 ; and Inez, bom 
in 1900. All the members of the family are communicants of the Baptist 
church. 

Mr. Thomas located at Watertown in 1895, in which year he opened 
his office in the insurance business. He is state agent for the National 
Union Fire Insurance Company, and spends a large part of his time in 
travel and in looking after the interests of the business of this company, 
which he has built up until it is one of the leading fire insurance com- 
panies in the state. Mr. Thonias ia a stockholder and one of the directors 
in the bank of Watertown. For two terms he served as mayor of Wat- 
ertown, and has also been clerk in the chancery court of Wilson county. 
He is an influential Democrat in politics, and is affiliated with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Elks and 
the Masonic order. He is past grand patriarch for the state of Tennes- 
see in the Odd Fellows, and is the present grand representative of the 
state in the same order. 

Alfred Hester. From the telegraph key to the presidency of a 
financial institution known as one of the most substantial in Sumner 
county, and th^ ownership of large farming and business interests, the 
career of Alfred Hester, of Portland, has been one of steady and con- 
tinued advancement. Although handicapped in youth, in that he lacked 
capital, influential friends or special educational advantages, he pos- 
sessed the much more valuable and desirable gifts of industry, determi- 
nation and inherent business ability, and with these as a capital has pro- 
ceeded to work out his own success through the medium of well-directed 
effort. Mr. Hester was bom in Sumner county, Tennessee, July 28, 
1871, and is a son of Robert M. and Mary (Groves) Hester. 

Robert M. Hester was a native of Kentucky, where he was bom in 
1843, a son of Martin Hester, a farmer of the Blue Grass state. Edu- 
cated in Kentucky, as a young man he came to Tennessee, and is now 
engaged successfully ih the drug business at Mitchellville. A Democrat 
in politics, Mr. Hester has served for twenty-four years as magistrate, 
being now in his fifth term, and has the distinction of being a veteran of 
the war between the states, through which he served as a Confederate 
soldier. He is fraternally affiliated with the Masons and his religious 
belief is that of the Christian church, while his wife belongs to the Meth- 
odist denomination. Mr. Hester was married to Mary Groves, daughter 
of Alfred Groves, a farmer, merchant and tobacco dealer in Sumner 
county, and they have three children: Lena, who married ^am Amett, 
and lives at Mitchellville; William, who resides in Portland, and Al- 
fred M. 

Alfred Hester's educational advantages were limited to those that 
could be secured in the country schools, and as a youth he learrit^d the 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1501 

trade of telegrapher, and for twelve years had charge of a key for the 
Louisville & Nashville Railroad. Being industrious and ambitious, he 
carefully saved his earnings, invested them wisely and with rare fore- 
sight, and eventually felt able to enter the produce business. Since 1902 
he has been engaged in shipping produce to New York, and this enter- 
prise has proved decidedly successful. The poor boy who started out to 
fight his own battles with the world but comparatively a few short years 
ago, is now the owner of three large farms and president of the Portland 
Bank, and has numerous other interests, and for ten years has acted in 
the capacity of postmaster at Portland, at this time being engaged in 
serving his third commission. In political matters Mr. Hester is a 
Republican, and his religious connection is with the Methodist Episcopal 
church, of which his wife and children are also members. Fraternally 
He holds membership in the Odd Fellows and the Loyal Order of Moose. 
On September 25, 1895, Mr. Hester was married to Edna Chisholm, 
daughter of John Chisholm, an early settler of Simpson county, Ken- 
tucky, and to this union there have been bom six children : Harold T., 
Robert V., Mary E., Douglas N. and Hattie Eudora, all attending school, 
and Edna Estelle, deceased. Mr. Hester has been the architect of his 
own fortunes in a marked degree, and has always been able to see an 
opportunity and be able to grasp it, but he has also respected the rights 
of others, and his operations have been so conducted as to win him the 
entire confidence of his fellow citizens. In a wide acquaintance gained 
through many years of business dealings, he numbers numerous friend- 
ships, and his reputation in business, society and politics is remarkably 
high. 

Benjamin J. Tarver. Judge Tarver passed virtually his entire life 
in Wilson county, Tennessee, and here gained a distinguished place as 
a jurist and lawyer of splendid talent, the while he left a definite and 
beneficent impress upon the history of the county, both along civic and 
material lines. He was a man of exalted integrity of character, broad 
and tolerant in his judgment, of kindly and sympathetic personality, and 
entirely free from intellectual bigotry. He made his life count for good 
in its every relation, was one of the representative and honored citizens' 
of northern Tennessee and it is thus most consonant that in this historical 
work be entered a tribute to his memory and a brief review of his career. 

In Warren county. North Carolina, Judge Tarver was born on the 
1st of July, 1827, a son of Silas and Nancy (Harris) Tarver, and was 
but three years of age at the time of the family immigration to Wilson 
county, Tennessee, where he passed the residue of his life, his death 
having occurred at his attractive old homestead in the city of Lebanon, 
on the 19th of September, 1905, at which time he was seventy -eight years 
of age. His father became one of the prosperous pioneer agriculturists 
of Wilson county, was influential in public affairs of a local order and 



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1502 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

was one of the loyal and honored citizens of the county until the close 
of his life, his cherished and devoted wife likewise having been a resident 
of this county at the time of her demise. Both were natives of North 
Carolina and both representatives of fine old colonial stock. Benjamin 
Tarver, grandfather of Judge Tarver, served in the battle of Guilford 
Court House, North Carolina, in the war of the Revolution, and was 
but sixteen years of age at the time. Five of his brothers were patriot 
soldiers of the Continental line in the great struggle for national inde- 
pendence. The lineage of the Tarver family is traced back to stanch 
Welsh origin, and genealogical records extant in England and America 
give family data from the time of Oliver Cromwell, the great dictator. 

In the common schools of the pioneer era in northern Tennessee 
Judge Tarver succeeded in gaining a symmetrical literary education, 
which was effectually amplified by self-discipline and constant devotion 
to the best of literature. In 1849-51 he pursued his course in the Lebanon 
Law School, a department of Cumberland University, and in this in- 
stitution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1851, in which 
year he received his degree of bachelor of laws and was admitted to 
the bar of the state. He forthwith opened an office in Lebanon, and 
though he initiated his professional career with capitalistic resources of 
only ten dollars, he had the self-confidence, the ability and the ambition 
that are invariably the concomitants of success, and he so<m built up a 
substantial and profitable law business, in connection with which he 
became known as a specially resourceful trial lawyer and as a counselor 
whose opinions were based on thorough knowledge of law and precedent 
and upon wise discrimination in determining the points of equity and 
justice. It was these same qualities that later gave him much of distinc- 
tion in his service on the bench. From 1852 to 1878 he was most pleasingly 
associated in practice with the late Edward I. Golladay, and their rela- 
tions were ever marked by mutual confidence and esteem and by the 
closest personal friendship. They controlled a large and representa- 
tive practice, as leaders at the bar of Wilson county, and their alliance 
was severed only when Judge Tarver was called upon to serve on the 
chancery bench. 

In the year 1878, Governor James D. Porter appointed Judge Tarver 
chancellor of the Sixth chancery district of the state, to complete an 
unexpired term, and he presided on the bench of this tribunal with 
all of ability and fidelity. In his law practice he had confined himself 
principally to the civil code, in the presentation of causes in the chancer>' 
court, and thus he brought to his judicial office not only marked technical 
ability but also large and varied experience in this department of judicial 
procedure. He was a man of gVeat business acumen and gained sub- 
stantial financial success within the course of his long and useful career, 
and he was one of the early stockholders and directors of the Tennessee 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1503 

Pacific Bailroad Company, as well as a member of the directorate of the 
Second National Bank of Lebanon. 

Prior to the Civil war Judge Tarver was an old-line Whig in his 
political allegiance, advocating the policies and principles that had been 
those of Henry Clay and John Bell, distinguished leaders in the ranks 
of that party. In the climateric period leading up to and culminating 
in the war Judge Tarver was vigorously opposed to secession on the part 
of the southern states and he earnestly labored to prevent the with- 
drawal of Tennessee from the Union, having made many speeches in 
behalf of this cause and having urged the same insistently in the private 
walks of life. When, however, his state gave its decision in favor of 
the Confederacy, Judge Tarver was loyal to the decision of the majority 
of its people and laid aside his personal opinions concerning the policy 
of secession to tender his aid in defense of the cause of the Confederate 
States. He enlisted as a private in the Seventh Tennessee Infantry Regi- 
ment, commanded by Colonel Hatton, and in 1862 he was promoted to the 
office of lieutenant, while the regiment was in camp at Trousdale, Sumner 
county, Tennessee. He participated in the spirited campaigns in Vir- 
ginia and Tennessee, took part in the battle of Murf reesboro and many 
other important engagements, and proved a gallant soldier and officer. 
In 1863 impaired health incapacitated him for further service in the 
field, and he was granted an honorable discharge. In later years he 
manifested his continued interest in his old comrades by maintaining 
affiliation with the United Confederate Veterans Association. 

In 1866 Judge Tarver was chosen a delegate from his congressional 
district, in company with Governor William B. Campbell, to the Phil- 
adelphia convention called to organize a national political party with 
which the southern states might consistently affiliate. He took part in 
the deliberations of that convention and thereafter continued as a 
stanch advocate of the principles of the Democratic party until the time 
of his death. * 

Judge Tarver was a man of broad views, well fortified opinions and 
utmost civic loyalty. He did all in his power to foster enterprises and 
measures projected for the general good of the community, took a lively 
interest in the social, moral, educational and industrial affairs of his 
home county, and was a frequent contributor to local newspapers, on 
topics touching political, religious and industrial affairs. He received 
the three degrees of ancient craft Masonry in 1865 and was also affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His life was guided and 
governed by the dictates of a specially acute conscience, the approval of 
which he demanded for his every motive and action, and no man has 
ever manifested a higher sense of personal stewardship. He was a 
zealous and liberal member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 
and of the same his widow likewise has long been a devoted adherent. 

On the 28th of July, 1875, in Wilson county, was solemnized the 



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1504 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

marriage of Judge Tarver to Miss Sue White, who was bom in Wilson 
county, Tennessee, and who is a daughter of the late Dr. James D. and 
Lucy (Shelton) White, both natives of Virginia and representative of 
sterling colonial families of the historic Old Dominion. Dr. White was 
a prominent physician and agriculturist in his adopted state, and upon 
his removal to Wilson county, Tennessee, he continued to devote his 
attention to the same lines of endeavor. Both he, and his wife passed 
the closing period of their lives in this county, secure in the high regard 
of all who knew them. Mrs. White was a daughter of James Shelton 
and was a sister of Rev. William Shelton, who was a distinguished clergy- 
man of the Baptist Church, South, and who removed from Nashville, 
Tennessee, to Kentucky, in which state he passed the residue of his life. 
Another brother was David Shelton, who was a prominent member of 
the bar of the city of Jackson, capital of the state of Mississippi, at 
the time of his demise. The genealogy of Mrs. Tarver is of distinguished 
order, with collateral kinship with the historic Marshall, Jefferson and 
Barron families of Virginia. Mrs. Tarver is a woman of distinctive 
culture and most gracious personality, and she has long been a loved and 
valued figure in the social activities of her home city. She was grad- 
uated in the excellent academy conducted in the city of Nashville by 
Rev. Collins D. Elliott, D. D., and she has ever continued to devote her- 
self to the best in standard and periodical literature, with a marked 
familiarity with that of classical and historical order. Deploring all ten- 
dencies to pretensions founded merely on family prominence, Il^Irs. Tarver 
very highly appreciates the historic insight and realization that is sure 
to result generally and universally from a study of ancestral records 
and historic events. She has been especially interested in historic rec- 
ords and to her was due the organization in Lebanon of a chapter of 
the Daughters of the American Revolution. Of this local chapter she 
has been historian since 1904, and she is most active in promoting the 
society and the objects for which it was organized. She still resides 
in the beautiful old homestead in Lebanon, and the same is not only a 
center of gracious hospitality but is also endeared to her by the hallowed 
memories and associations of past years. Judge and Mrs. Tarver not 
being blessed with children, have fostered and reared many orphaned 
members of their families. Both Judge Tarver and his wife have, during 
their whole lives, honored and valued above all else, simplicity of char- 
acter and humble Christian usefulness. 

John McReynolds Gaut. A distinguished Nashville attorney and 
official of the Presbyterian church, Mr. Gaut is one of the seniors of the 
Tennessee bar, having begun practice forty-five years ago, soon after the 
war. His father before him ranked a peer among the most eminent 
Tennessee lawyers of his generation. Few families have contributed so 
many sterling qualities of mind and character to the life and citizenship 



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TENNESSEE AND'TENNESSEANS 1505 

of Tennessee during the last century as the Gauts. John McReynolds 
Gaut was born at Cleveland, Bradley county, Tennessee, October 1, 1841, 
a son of John C. and Sarah (McReynolds) Gaut. The Gaut family is of 
Scotch-Irish descent, th<e first member of which immigrated to the colony 
of Pennsylvania, and thence to Virginia, finally coming over the moun- 
tains to Tennessee. Grandfather James Gaut came to Tennessee early 
in the last century, and lived for some time in Jefferson county, where 
his son, John C. Gaut, was born in 1813. The late John C. Gaut, who 
died in 1895, was educated at Maryville College and at the University 
of Tennessee, took up the law as his profession, and began his practice 
at Cleveland. Not only as a practitioner, but also in a financial way- he 
was unusually successful. For twelve years be served as judge of the 
fourth judicial circuit, resigning in 1865 and moving to Nashville, in 
which city he began his practice and continued with few interruptions 
until his death. In 1866 and 1867 he served as chairman of the state 
executive committee of the Conservative party, and was a member of 
the constitutional convention of 1865, which reorganized the state gov- 
ernment. Several times his ability resulted in his appointment as special 
judge of supreme court. He had begun practice in Cleveland only the 
year following the removal of the Cherokee Indians from Tennessee. In 
politics he adhered to the old-line Whig party and stood strongly for the 
Union before and during the war. Late in life he became a member of 
the Cumberland Presbyterian church, and was also afiSliated with the 
Masonic order. His wife, Sarah McReynolds, who was born in Tennes- 
see, was a daughter of an early settler in McMinn county. She died in 
1873, her death occurring from cholera in the epidemic in Nashville. 
The parents had six children, two of whom are now living, John M. Guut 
and his sister Anna E., widow of P. H. Manlove. She resides in Nash- 
ville. 

John McReynolds Gaut had home surroundings and an example in 
his father which proved great inspiration to his early career. He was 
liberally educated at the academy in Cleveland and Rutger's College in 
New Brunswick, New Jersey, where he was graduated in 1866, A. B., 
took his degree of Master of Arts in 1869, and was awarded the degree 
of Doctor of Laws in 1908. The same degree was conferred upon him 
in 1907 by the Missouri Valley College of Missouri. After admission 
to the bar he began his practice in December, 1867, and has been contin- 
uously identified with the Tennessee hsx since that time. He has always 
enjoyed an extensive practice and for thirty years has been attorney for 
the American National Bank of Nashville, and has represented several 
other business corporations. During the last seven years his practice has 
enlarged in scope and volume. Beginning in 1906 he attained special 
prominence as general counsel for the Presbyterian church in th^ United 
States of America in the prolonged litigation over church property 
growing out of the union of that church with the Cumberland Presbyte- 



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1506 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

rian denomination. As the representative of that church he haa ap- 
peared before the supreme courts of twelve states, and was successful in 
ten states out of twelve. He has also had cases in the federal courts in 
Tennessee and Missouri in the supreme court of the United States. In 
civil-ecclesiastical jurisprudence, this is probably the most notable liti- 
gation of modem times. The Presbyterian committee on legal matters 
connected with the reunion, in its report to the General Assembly of 
1913, say : 

* * The committee desires to reiterate and emphasize its former expres- 
sions as to Judge Gaut's professional ability, also his industry, energy 
and faithfulness in acting as committee's counsel." 

The committee also quote approvingly from a report of Judge Gaut 
to the committee as follows : 

** As you doubtless realize, the litigation to which we have sustained a 
mutual relation must be recorded in history as the most remarkable 
known to the judicial history of any country. The United Brethren 
cases originated in eight states of the Union, and involved much property 
and questions of great importance. The litigation with which we have 
been connected arose in thirteen statas, involved directly and indirectly 
probably not less than six millions of dollars of property, affected a very 
large number of people and involved questions of great importance. It 
called for a judicial determination of the relation, in this country, 
betiN'een church and state, between ecclesiastical and civil courts, the 
fundamental nature of ecclesiastical government, and the powers of all 
ecclesiastical judicatories. A serious indictment was brought against 
the doctrines of the Presbyterian church in the U. S. A., materially 
affecting the church's theological standing. It is evident that by this liti- 
gation the law of this country relating to the subjects above indicated 
will be thoroughly settled, and much light from it will radiate across 
the seas to foreign countries. Many fundamental principles of law affect- 
ing religious societies will be established, which are of vital importance to 
all churches in the United States, and of great importance to churches 
throughout the world." 

Mr. Gaut, in young manhood, served in the city council of Nashville, 
and his name has been identified with many movements and enterprises 
of a public nature. He is actively interested in everything that pro- 
motes public welfare. For a great many years he has been an elder in 
the Cumberland Presbyterian church and since the union in the Presby- 
terian church, and is probably the best known layman of that denomi- 
nation in Tennessee. In 1870 he became a member of the board of 
publication of the church, and was officially connected with the publi- 
cation department for thirty-one years, serving as president of the board 
for twelve years, and general manager of publication work for ten years. 
He has attended more than twenty-five sessions of the general assembly. 
He was a member of the judicial commission of the Presbyterian church. 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1507 

U. S. A., this body being practically the supreme court of the church. 
He was also a member of the supreme ad interim executive head of the 
church, known as the executive commission, and a member of the com- 
mittee on administrative agencies which existed for several years. He is 
widely known and beloved throughout the church and generally believed 
to be the best informed man in the country on civil law, ecclesiastical 
law and church history, as they are related to each other. 

Mr. Gaut in 1870 married Michal M. Harris, a daughter of William 
O. Harris, who for years was proprietor and one of the editors of the 
Nashville Banner, and a man of prominence in this city. Mrs. Gaut 
died in 1871. She was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian 
church. In 1876 Mr. Gaut married Sallie Crutchfield, daughter of 
Thomas Crutchfield, who spent most of the years of his life in Chatta- 
nooga, where he was owner of the Crutchfield House, now better known 
as the Read House. He was perhaps the most eminent farmer in the 
state and member of the agricultural commission of the state. Mr. 
Gaut's great-grandfather, Isaac Lane, was a soldier of the Revolution 
and fought in the battle of Kings Mountain. The three living children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Gaut are : Mrs. Amanda G. Hardcastle, wife of Kendrick 
C. Hardcastle, who is district sui)erintendent and traffic manager of the 
Bell Telephone Company ; Sarah M. and Mary A. are both living at home. 
Mr. Gaut is a Democrat in politics, though he recognizes, in theory and 
in action, that every man's supreme allegiance is to the welfare of the 
country rather than to any political party. 

Marcus B. Toney. An exceptional business record is that of Marcus 
B. Toney. More than forty years ago he was made representative of the 
New York Central Lines at Nashville. Nominally his position has 
remained the same in all the succeeding years. Actually his responsibili- 
ties have increased in proportion as the commerce and transportation of 
the nation have expanded in these four decades. Mr. Toney possesses 
the faculty of being able to adapt himself to the changing conditions of 
a growing business, and has rendered a valuable service both to his cor- 
poration and the public. 

Marcus B. Toney, who belongs to an old southern family, was bom 
on a farm eigbt miles from Lynchburg in Campbell county, Virginia, 
August 19, 1840. William Henry Clay Toney, his father, was bom in 
Buckingham county, Virginia, and was reared and educated in his native 
state, where he learned the trade of millwright. In 1842 he emigrated 
to Tennessee, bringing his family and slaves and making the removal 
with teams and wagons, and it was three weeks from the time he left 
Virginia before he reached his destination in Tennessee. After two, 
years spent in the little city of Nashville, he crossed the river and bought 
ten acres of timbered land on which he built a saw and grist mill in the 
woods, operating his machinery with horse power. When a road was 



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1508 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

built past the mill it was known as White Creek Pike, and is now First 
street of Nashville. He continued to operate his local industries until 
his death in 1852. His wife was Elizabeth Ann Minton Goodwin, who 
was born in Amherst county, Virginia, a daughter of George B. and 
Elizabeth Ann (Minton) Goodwin. The Goodwin family dates in Vir- 
ginia back to 1616. When William H. C. Toney and wife left Virginia 
their goal was St. Louis, but on the way they stopped for d time in Nash- 
ville, and on account of low waters in the river, and afterwards because 
of the failing health of the mother, they concluded not to go any further. 
Mrs. Toney died in Nashville in 1846. She was the mother of four chil- 
dren, three of whom died very young, so that Marcus B. Toney is the 
only living representative of the family. 

Having lost his parents when very young, Mr. Toney was cared for 
by a negro mammy from the death 'of his mother until his father died, 
and then went back to the old family home in Virginia, at Lynchburg, 
where he attended school. In 1860 he returned to Nashville, and was 
clerk on a steamboat until the outbreak of the war. At the beginning of 
that struggle he enlisted in Company B of the First Regiment of Ten- 
nessee Volunteers, went into Virginia, fought in the Army of Northern 
Virginia, under Lee, and was in Stonewall Jackson 's command. He was 
with the regiment in its various marches and battles until 1864. In Feb- 
ruary of that year he was transferred to the Forty-fourth Virginia 
Regiment, and fought with that command in the Battle of the Wilder- 
ness. On May 12, 1864, he was captured by the Federals and taken to 
prison at Point Lookout in Maryland, and in the following July was 
transferred to Elmira, New York, where he was held a prisoner until 
June, 1865. Being then released, he returned to Nashville, and entered 
the employ of the Southern Express Company. On December 4, 1868, 
Mr. Toney was on board the ill-fated steamer United States when it was 
wrecked on the Ohio river near Warsaw, Kentucky, when one hundred 
and thirty people lost their lives. Mr. Toney escaped by swimming 
through the icy waters to the shore. In 1872 Mr. Toney entered the 
employ of the New York Central Railroad Company as commercial 
agent at Nashville, and in that capacity has been retained for a period 
of forty-one years, during which he has faithfully looked after the inter- 
ests of the great railroad system in Nashville and throughout this sec- 
tion of southern territory. 

In January, 1872, he married Miss Sally Hill Claiborne, who was born 
in Buckingham county, Virginia, a daughter of John C. and Ann 
(Bransford) Claiborne. Mr. and Mrs. Toney have two children, named 
Helen and Marion Toney. Helen married Henry W. Skeggs, and her 
two children are Helen Claiborne and Marion B. Mr. Toney and wife 
are members of the Methodist church. Since 1866 he has held active 
membership in the Masonic fraternity, and was the founder of the 
Masonic Widows' and Orphans' Home near Nashville, an institution to 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1509 

which Col. Ira Baxter donated ten acres of land as a beautiful site. In 
1906 Mr. Toney published his war reminiscences, entitled *'The Priva- 
tions of a Private." 

Joseph Stikeford Carels. A long service of quiet usefulness has 
been performed by Joseph Stineford Carels in the city of Nashville, 
where he has lived for half a century. Not all the best work of the 
world is done in the fields of industry and commerce, nor in the usual 
professions. Invaluable duties, necessary to the proper functions of the 
world and society, are often discharged with great fidelity and capability 
by men and women who occupy none of the conspicuous places in life. 

Joseph Stineford Carels has for the past thirty years been treasurer 
and librarian of the Tennessee Historical Society, and also superintend- 
ent of the Watkins Institute of Nashville. He was bom in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, August 30, 1825. William Carels, his father, was also 
bom in Philadelphia in 1793. Grandfather Samuel Carels was bom in 
Philadelphia of German parents. The grandfather was a carpenter 
and builder, and spent all his career in the city of Philadelphia. The 
father was likewise a life-long resident of Philadelphia, and died at the 
age of seventy-nine years. The maiden name of his wife was Mary Stine- 
ford, who was bom in Philadelphia, a daughter of Gteorge Stineford, a 
native of Germany. Her death occurred when she was eighty years old. 
and she reared twelve out of a large family of sixteen children. 

Joseph Stineford Carels graduated from the Central high school of 
Philadelphia in 1843. In 1851 that school conferred upon him the 
degree of Master of Arts. After his graduation he began his career as a 
clerk in a wholesale dry goods store in his native city. Eighteen months 
later in 1845 he moved to Tennessee, and became clerk in a dry goods 
house at Murfreesboro, where he remained until 1857. After that he 
served as bookkeeper and teller in the Bank of Middle Tennessee at Leb- 
anon until the outbreak of the war. He then came to Nashville, and in 
1862 presented to the secretary of the United States navy a petition 
signed by every member of congress requesting a position in the navy. 
He was accordingly appointed assistant paymaster, and attached to the 
steamer Clifton in Admiral Farragut's gulf squadron. He remained in 
the service for about one year, when ill health compelled him to retire 
and return to Nashville. In this city he was appointed bookkeeper and 
stamp clerk in the postoflfice, and spent about twenty years in the office, 
serving as assistant postmaster under Postmasters Hopkins, Embry and 
Hasslock. 

Mr. Carels was made a Mason in Murfreesboro, when he joined the 
Mount Moriah Lodge, A. F. and A. M., in 1843. In 1852 he served as 
worshipful master of the Murfreesboro lodge. In 1852 he joined Pyth- 
agoras Chapter No. 23, R. A. M., and in 1866 took the last degrees in the 
York Rite and became a member of Nashville Commandery No. 1, K. T. 

Vol. V— 20 



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1510 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

In 1865 he joined Alminah Temple of the Mystic Shrine, and was a 
charter member of Emulation Lodge No. 3, A. and A. S. R. For forty- 
six years he has been secretary of the Cumberland Lodge No. 8 of Masons 
in Nashville. He has served as captain general, standard bearer and 
guard of Nashville Commandery No. 1, K. T., and secretary of the 
Masonic Library and the several Miuwnic bodies, all at the same time, and 
tor twelve years was librarian of the Howard Library until it was merged 
with the Carnegie Library. 

' James A. WujLiams. Among the successful agriculturists of Cheat- 
ham county, Tennessee, is James A. Williams, who resides near Cheap 
Hill. Bom May 25, 1855, in the adjoining county of Robertson, he is a 
scion of two of its oldest connections, the Williams and Shearon fami- 
lies, the former of Virginia stock and originally of Welsh lineage, and 
the latter descended from North Carolina immigrants. Wiley W. Wil- 
liams, the father of James A., also was a native of Robertson county and 
spent his entire life there, passing away on April 10, 1865. He was the 
first county court clerk of Cheatham county elected by the popular vote. 
He was a farmer by occupation. First a Whig and then a Democrat in 
politics, he took an active interest in political affairs and served as the 
first county clerk of Cheatham county after Cheatham county had been 
formed from a portion of Robertson county. Fraternally he was aflSliated 
with the time-honored Masonic order. His father, Christopher Williams, 
was bom in Virginia and came into Tennessee early in the last century, 
settling in Robertson county. He was one of the founders of the First 
Methodist church established in the present limits of Cheatham county, 
though it was Robertson county at that time. The family had first been 
planted on American soil by emigrants from Wales. Wiley W. Wil- 
liams wedded Mary Shearon, who was bom in Robertson county, Ten- 
nessee, June 22, 1822, and departed life in December, 1910, at the 
advanced age of eighty -seven years. She was the daughter of Zachariah 
Shearon, who came into Tennessee from North Carolina about 1800 and 
settled on a farm in Robertson county, and whose father. Sterling 
Shearon, was the originator of the family in this state. 

James A., the youngest of five children born to Wiley W. and Mary 
(Shearon) Williams, was reared to farm pursuits and received his edu- 
cation in the country schools of his n^itive vicinity. He took up life 
independently as a farmer in Cheatham county and has continued to be 
identified with that vocation to the present time, beginning his business 
career with no capital save his own native resources. By intelligent 
effort and well directed energies he has forged steadily forward toward 
the goal of success and today is the owner of a good farm of 150 acres, 
with a comfortable dwelling and such other improvements as make it an 
attractive rural home. Mr. Williams has also taught school in Cheatham 
county ten years and has entered actively into the public life of his 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1511 

community, having served eighteen years as. a magistrate of the fifteenth 
civil district and being now chairman of the county court. In addition 
to these public positions he has also been a member of the board of edu- 
cation and represented Cheatham county in the legislature of 1887. In 
political allegiance he is a Democrat. Through these different relations 
to society he has become well known in his county and his life and ser- 
vices have been of that order that has won him a high standing in public 
esteem. 

In November, 1886, Mr. Williams was 'united in marriage to Miss 
Mary L. Weakley, whose father, William D. Weakley, was a native of 
Montgomery county, Tennessee, and spent his entire life there. Mr. 
and Mrs. Williams have six children, named : Cora, Nannie, Mary, Louis, 
Martha and Benton, the last three of whom are attending school. Mrs. 
Williams is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Williams 
is united fraternally with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

J. L. Davis, M. D., holds a high rank among the professional men of 
Watertown, Tennessee, and of the surroimding country. He has been 
in active practice in Watertown for a number of years and the combina- 
tion of personal charm and technical skill with which he is endowed has 
won for him many warm friends and admirers. He has been very suc- 
cessful as a physician, and is a land holder as well as a professional man. 

J. L. Davis was bom in Wilson county, Tennessee, on the 30th day of 
November, 1865. His father is James H. Davis, who was bom in Vir- 
ginia in 1840, and whose parents were natives of the state of Virginia 
also. James H. Davis migrated to Tennessee and there met and mar- 
ried Armenia Jennings, a daughter of Riley C. Jennings, who was one 
of the earliest settlers in Wilson county, where he lived and died. Mrs. 
Davis was bom in Wilson county in 1845 and both she and her husband 
are living in that county at present. Mr. Davis started out in life with 
nothing of material means in his possession, and he has succeeded in 
rearing and educating his large family of children, and is now worth 
about twelve thousand dollars. With the outbreak of the Civil war he 
enlisted in the Confederate army and served throughout the four years 
of the civil conflict under General Hatton. After the war he returned to 
a desolated farm and set to work to build it up to some semblance of a 
productive place, with the result already noted. In politics Mr. Davis 
is a member of the Democratic party, and for a number of years served 
as a magistrate of the county. Both he and his wife are members of the 
Baptist church. 

John L. Davis grew up on his father's farm, but he had no inclination 
to t^e life of a farmer, and as a mere lad determined to obtain an educa- 
tion. He was the third of his father's children and grew up in the years 
when the father was trjdng to retrieve his losses caused by the war, so 
that the lad had to borrow money for his college education. He first 



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1512 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

attended the Southwestern Baptist University at Jackson, Tennessee, 
and later entered the medical department of the Vanderbilt University, 
from which he was graduated in 1893. 

Dr. Davis began the practice of his profession at Henderson Cross 
Roads, in his native state, and for seven years made this his home. In 
1900 he removed to Watertov^Ti, and established a practice that has 
jarrown with the years, until now the doctor has about all the patients he 
can take care of, though he is one of those men who always have the time 
and energy to do one thing' more. He has never permitted any other 
interests to intervene between his professional duties and himself, and 
so is able to accomplish more than many of his confreres. 

Mr. Davis was married in 1893 to Stella Hale, a daughter of Dodd 
Hale. The latter was a native of Wilson county, where he spent many 
years of his life as a farmer. He was best known, however, as a preacher 
of the Methodist church. Dr. Davis and his wife are the parents of three 
children, all of whom are attending school. They are James W., Marga- 
ret and Edith. 

The doctor is a member uid a deacon of the BaptLst cliurch, while 
his wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal denomination. He takes 
quite an interest in fraternal affairs, being a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and of the Knights of Pythias. In the latter 
order he is past chancellor cK)mmander. In politics he is a member of 
the Democratic party, but has never cared to take any active part in 
the game of political warfare. He owns some valuable bank stock and a 
fine farm, and should he desire to give up his practice he would be com- 
fortably situated in a financial way. Since the doctor's chief interest 
lies in his profession, it is but natural that he should take an active 
interest in the affairs of the state and county medical societies, in both of 
which he holds membership. 

WiLLUM S. Shields. Prominent among the financiers who have con- 
served the money interests of Knoxville for the past several decades, Wil- 
liam S. Shields, president of the City National Bank, has interested 
himself in various other enterprises of an extensive nature. He entered 
the banking business in 1888, when he was one of the organizers of the 
City National Bank, and his wise and careful management of its affairs 
has made it one of the leading financial institutions of the city. Mr. 
Shields is one of a family of ten boys born to James T. and Elizabeth 
(Simpson) Shields, both of whom are now deceased. The father was a 
prominent jurist of Tennessee, and practiced law in the state for many 
years. Further mention concerning him is made in a sketch devoted to 
Hon. John Knight Shields, United States senator from his state. 

William Simpson Shields was bom in Grainger county, Tennessee, 
on the 13th day of October, 1853, and his early education was secured 
in the common schools. On the completion of his studies, he engaged in 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1513 

• 

stock raising, and some of the best blooded cattle, sheep and swine in 
the southern states were bred on his farm. Mr. Shields continued in the 
stock-breeding business until coming to Knoxville in 1888, when he 
organized the City National Bank, becoming its first cashier and remain- 
ing in that capacity until assuming the position of president, having 
held these positions for twenty-five years. A man of careful and con- 
servative ideas, he is also possessed of the courage necessary to handle 
affairs of an extensive character and the policy he has used in banking 
matters has gained him prestige in financial circles and the full confi- 
dence of his community. The City National Bank is one of the largest 
in Knoxville as well as one of the most substantial and prosperous. Mr. 
Shields is also a partner in the firm of Gillespie, Shields & Company, 
manufacturers of the ** Shield Brand" clothing, the firm consisting of 
John K. Gillespie, Mr. Shields and E. H. Scharringhaus. 

Mr. Shields has served as president of the Cumberland Club, is vice- 
president of the Knoxville Railway & Light Company, and a director in 
numerous other large enterprises, which are realizing something of the 
benefit of his connection with them. Various movements for the welfare 
of his city have been promoted and fostered by him, and he is especially 
interested in anything that tends to elevate the young and worthy men 
of the day. 

Mr. Shields was united in marriage on October 30, 1889, to Mias 
Alice Watkins, the daughter of Arthur P. and Anna (Nielson) Watkins. 
Mr. and Mrs. Shields are afiiliated'with the Second Presbyterian church 
of Knoxville. Their home, located on Melrose avenue, covering three 
acres, is one of the finest and most beautiful in Knoxville. Essentially 
a business man, Mr. Shields has not allowed the glamour of the public 
arena to entice him, although he takes a good citizen's interest in the 
political affairs of the day. His long and honorable career in EInoxville 
has made him well known not only in business and financial circles, but 
in club, social and fraternal life, where his hosts of friends testify to his 
popularity. 

Concerning the family of sons of which Mr. Shields is one, and the 
eldest, but three others are living today. One is Hon. John Knight 
Shields, the widely knoT^Ti jurist and senator; another is Samuel G. 
Shields, a lawyer, and the third is Joseph S. Shields, a jobbing merchant 
<^f New York City. 

Davto Campbell Kelly Binklet, M. D. The Binkley family origi- 
nated in Germany, but of their ancestry insufficient data is at hand to 
make possible a complete record of the family since its establishment in 
America. It is known, however, that they first settled in Pennsylvania 
and from there moved to various states of the Union. Two brothers. 
John and Adam Binkley, came from Pennsylvania and located in North 
Carolina, thence moving to Tennessee in later years. From these two 



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1514 TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 

it is thought that all the Binkleys in Tennessee descended. Of these 
brothers, John Binkley is the progenitor of Dr. David C. K. Binkley of 
this review. 

John Binkley became the father of Frederic, who was born in North 
Carolina, but on reaching manhood moved to Tennessee, locating in 
Nashville, where he followed his trade of carpenter for a number of 
years. He later moved on a farm in Davidson county, trading his Nash- 
ville property for the farm, and there he lived near nature until his 
death in 1857, when he was eighty-four years of age. He was the father 
of Joseph Binkley, who spent his life in Davidson county. He followed 
farming and was a prominent and prosperous man in his community. 
He was a Whig until in later years when the party was succeeded by the 
Republican party, when he affiliated with the Democratic faction and 
thereafter his support and sympathies were centered there. He was 
born on November 19, 1810, and died in August, 1887. He married 
Martha Buchanan Steele, bom in Davidson county in 1911. She was a 
daughter of Samuel and Patience (Shane) Steele, North Carolinans 
by birth, who were interested in agriculture all their lives. The father 
served in the Indian wars under General Jackson, and in his younger 
days gave considerable attention to the business of hunting and trap- 
ping. He died in 1864 when he was in his eighty-second year of life. 
Joseph and Martha B. (Steele) Binkley were married in Davidson 
county in 1832, and they became the parents of twelve children — six 
sons and six daughters. David C. K. Binkley was the youngest of that 
number, and five of the family are living today. The wife and mother 
died in 1859, and in later years the father married Mrs. Elizabeth (Iva) 
Holland, a widow who had one child. She is now deceased. 

David Campbell K. Binkley was bom in Davidson county, Tennes- 
see, on the 30th day of June, 1857. He found his early education in the 
common schools of Davidson county, and later attended a private school 
in Decaturville, Tennessee, under the tutelage of R. P. Griffith. When 
he had been sufficiently prepared for higher studies, he went to Vander- 
bilt College at Nashville, Tennessee, where he took a medical course, 
finishing his studies in 1878 and graduating with the degree of M. D. at 
the head of his class, winning two gold medals — ^the Pounder's medal for 
general proficiency in all branches and also the medal in anatomy 
given by Dr. T. 0. Sinimons. His first active practice of his profession 
was at Hustberg, Tennessee, and so well did he succeed that he con- 
tinued in that place, which is still the scene of his professional activities 
and his home as well. In 1891 he engaged in the drug business in con- 
nection with his practice, and in that, as in his profession, he has pros- 
pered in a pleasing degree with the passing years. His early acquaint- 
ance with farm life bred in him a fondness for things agricultural, and 
when his prosperity made it possible, Dr. Binkley purchased a fine farm 
in the vicinity of Hurstberg, and later added to his possession a similar 



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TENNESSEE AND TENNESSEANS 1515 

property in Davidson county, in both of which he takes a considerable 
pleasure. In November, 1911, Dr. Binkley suffered a severe fire loss at 
his store in Hustberg, which constitutes practically the one piece of 
financial loss of any moment that he has suffered since he has been 
established in business. 

Dr. Binkley is a Republican, not particularly active in affairs of that 
nature, but withal a good citizen, and one who takes the maximum inter- 
est in civic movements designed to advance the material and moral 
status of the community. He is a member of the county and state medi- 
cal societies and the American Medical Ass